March 13, 1944

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I have another statement, Mr. Speaker, which I should like to make to the house. It has to do with restrictions upon the sale of beer.

On December 16, 1942, the government, by an order in council known as the wartime alcoholic beverages order, limited the quantity of spirits, wine and beer to be released for sale in the period from November 1, 1942, to October 31, 1943, to 70, 80 and 90 per cent respectively of the quantity released in the previous twelve months. The period of this limitation was subsequently extended for the duration of the war.

The restrictions upon the quantity of alcoholic beverages to be released for sale, were in accordance with the government's policy, to effect, if possible, a total war effort. They were in response to an informed public opinion, and to a widespread public demand for some measure of restriction. It had become evident throughout 1942, and even earlier, that increased production and excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages at a time of war could not but impair the effectiveness of the country's war effort.

In the first three years of war, the consumption of alcoholic beverages had increased enormously. Over the same period, restrictions had been increasingly imposed upon the use of many commodities, including not a few of the necessities of life. Restrictions had also been placed upon the use of gasoline and upon travel abroad as well as at home. Moreover, the country, by the close of 1942, had reached practically the peak of shortages both of man-power and materials. The government was making every effort to divert men and resources from non-essential activities of all kinds. This policy had already affected the production of alcoholic beverages. The entire distilling capacity of the country had been converted to the manufacture of industrial alcohol for war purposes. The production of wine had been limited by the rationing of sugar. The production of beer had been restricted by a limitation in the supply of malt.

The wartime alcoholic beverages order did not, therefore, actually greatly increase the restrictions on the supply of alcoholic beverages. The basic limitation was, in fact, the result of war-time demands for man-power and materials for essential war needs. The restrictions did provide for an orderly and

equitable distribution of the available supplies among the several provinces in exact proportion to the quantities released for sale in each province in the preceding year.

I wish to emphasize the fact that, with respect to alcoholic beverages, the federal limitations apply only to the quantities released for sale to each of the provinces. The retail sale and distribution of alcoholic beverages is left entirely to the provincial authorities.

It was clear from the outset that the war-time alcoholic beverages order, like other war-time restrictions would be effective only if the necessary cooperation and support was forthcoming on the part of the several provinces of the dominion. It was for this reason that at the time the order was enacted, I took care to explain in a public address the relations of the dominion and provincial governments with respect to the production and sale of alcoholic beverages, and to make a special appeal to the provinces to lend their cooperation. This I did in the following words:

The federal government has to do with their (i.e. alcoholic beverages) production and importation; the provincial governments with their sale and distribution. In other words, while the dominion government is in a position to control the quantities of spirits, wine and beer to be released for consumption, the regulation of the retail sales of alcoholic beverages is a matter which is determined by each province according to its judgment. . . .

An examination of existing war-time needs now makes it necessary for the federal government, in addition to the measures I have announced, to appeal to the provinces for their cooperation in further restricting the sale of alcoholic beverages.

In the case of most of the provinces there has been a gratifying effort to cooperate. There has been notwithstanding, much misrepresentation throughout the dominion of the government's purpose, and, as time has gone on less and less has been said about the reasons for and the limited scope of the restrictions themselves.

Within the past few days a situation has arisen in relation to two of the provinces which is so far removed from cooperation on the part of their governments that it is certain to give -rise to an issue between the federal -and provincial authorities. If not promptly prevented, any such issue cannot fail to create continuous friction between some of the provincial governments and the federal government, and antagonisms between one section of the country and another.

In Ontario, on the authority of the liquor control board, -notices have been posted in establishments where alcoholic beverages are sold, which read as follows:

Alcoholic Beverages

Notice: The quantity of alcoholic beverages saleable at this sales outlet is restricted by reason of order in council No. 11374 passed by the federal government Dec. 16, 1942.-This notice is posted on authority of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario.

There is no indication in these notices that the action of the federal government was a war measure, enacted to increase the country's total war effort. No account is taken or mention made of the fact that the production and consumption of alcoholic beverages in 1942 had reached the highest level in Canada's history. Instead, the poster is designed to have it appear that, in the opinion of the government of Ontario, the action of the federal government is arbitrary, unfair and unnecessary.

Since the enactment of the dominion wartime alcoholic beverages order, there has during the year been released for sale in each province of Canada, ninety per cent of the beer which was released for sale in the twelve months ended October 31, 1942. Over the whole country, this amount was some sixty per cent in excess of that which had been released for sale in the year prior to the outbreak of war. To-day the beverage rooms of Ontario, where the notices of the Ontario Liquor Control Board are posted, are not being allocated 90 per cent by the board. Instead, they are being allotted only 75 per cent. It is true that the quantity saleable in the province has been restricted by the dominion order in- council,, but it was not restricted by 25 per cent. That restriction on the beverage rooms was imposed by the liquor control board of Ontario.

The board's action has the approval of the government of Ontario. It was defended by the Attorney General of Ontario in the Ontario legislature on the 8th of this month. The posting of the notices certainly misrepresents the action of the federal government. It is clearly an attempt to have the federal government held responsible for the whole twenty-five per cent reduction.

On the day before (March 7), in the Alberta legislature, the provincial treasurer is reported to have stated that "some of the eastern provinces were tipped off" to the wartime alcoholic beverages order of 1942, and that the dominion government "fixed the base year to give the greatest advantage to Quebec".

The Minister of National Revenue has completely denied this statement in the following words: [DOT]

Such a statement is entirely without foundation and untrue and not one that would normally be expected to be made by a responsible minister of the crown.

While Mr. Low complains of the quota allowed to his province, it might be pointed 100-88

out that in the year ending October 31, 1943, the province of Alberta failed to take up its full allotment, and was short 9,945-6 proof gallons of spirits to which the province was entitled.

If effect is to be given its war-time policies, the federal government must necessarily rely upon the cooperation of the provincial governments. This, as I have pointed out, is particularly true of war-time restrictions upon the supply of alcoholic beverages. Despite the fact that the supply is affected by shortages of essential materials and man-power, and the further fact that the federal restriction is merely a restriction upon the quantities released to each province, the public has been increasingly led to believe that the supply available for consumption, and any difficulties of distribution, are due solely to action on the part of the federal government.

In the case of spirits and wine, the reasons for the limitation of supplies are, I believe, generally understood and generally accepted. The misrepresentations and the controversies which have arisen have to do largely with the restriction upon the supply of beer.

In the case of beer, the supply is limited by shortages of malt, of bottles, of cartons and of man-power, which are likely to continue as long as the war lasts. Apart altogether from *the 10 per cent reduction imposed by the wartime alcoholic beverages order, the shortages of themselves would prevent any very considerable increase in supply. No right thinking person would advocate the diversion of scarce materials or man-power from any essential war-time or civilian activity to the production of beer.

At this time of war, it is especially true that a first duty of the federal government is to see that no differences which can be prevented are allowed to interfere with the cooperation and understanding so necessary between the federal and provincial governments. In the interests of the war effort, sources of public misunderstanding and friction, where they exist, should be removed in so far as that may be possible.

The provinces, under their power to regulate the distribution and sale of beer can effectively limit the amount to be distributed1 and sold, and this quite apart from any federal restriction as to the amount to be released for sale. Where it is clear that causes other than federal action are restricting the supply of beer, maintenance by the federal authorities, of the 10 per cent reduction upon the 1942 output of this single commodity is not sufficiently important to the war effort to justify the risk of continuous misunderstanding and friction between the fed-

Alcoholic Beverages

eral and provincial governments and of antagonisms between provinces. In these circumstances, it is obviously preferable that the distribution and sale of such supply of beer as there may be, should be left to the exclusive control of the provinces themselves.

The government has therefore decided to remove the restriction of ten per cent upon the supply of beer which may be released for sale to the provinces, and the wartime alcoholic beverages order has to-day, been amended accordingly. _

In leaving to the provinces the exclusive responsibility for the amount of beer to be distributed and sold, the federal government is not departing from its view that a restriction of the production and consumption of alcoholic beverages is necessary to a total war effort. In all particulars, except the one mentioned, the wartime alcoholic beverages order will remain as it is.

As respects the retail distribution and sale of beer, each province is now freed from any federal restriction as to quantity of beer to be released for sale within its borders. The provinces will have the sole responsibility to make whatever arrangements each considers necessary and desirable to ensure an equitable distribution and to prevent any excesses.

Mr. Speaker, I now table copies of the order in council which was passed to-day.

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

I rise to a point of order, Mr. Speaker, and also to ask you a question for information. Is the statement just made by the Prime Minister debatable at this time?

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

No.

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Then I want to register my regret at the fact that the Prime Minister has made a right-about-face on a matter that is of concern to the whole Dominion of Canada without giving us an opportunity to debate it,

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

Mr. Speaker, in justice to the province of Alberta-

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

May I be allowed to say, Mr. Speaker, that the Prime Minister's remarks do not represent the whole of the truth.

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   REMOVAL OP FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SUPPLIES OF BEER TO PROVINCES
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NATIONAL HEALTH

REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD

LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. RALSTON (Minister of National Defence):

I desire to lay on the table the report on the national health survey conducted by the Canadian Medical Procurement and

Assignment Board. Since the report is, I think, of special importance and is very voluminous, I wish to make a comment or two upon it.

The board was established on the 20th July, 1942, by P.C. 6185, and later its activities were extended to the dental and nursing services by P.C. 10360 of 17th November, 1942, and P.C. 10394 of 1st December, 1942. The board consisted of five members of the Canadian Medical Advisory Committee (appointed by the Canadian Medical Association), the Director of Medical Services of the Department of Pensions and National Health, the Medical Director of National War Services, a representative of the Director of National Selective Service and the heads of the three medical services of navy, army and air and the directors of dental services. Among the functions of the board were:

(a) to make a survey and allocate as a result of information obtained medical officers in the proper proportions for appointment to the three branches of the armed forces of Canada;

(b) to consider carefully in relation to the available supply of physicians for appointment to the armed forces, the requirements of civilian institutions, public health departments, medical schools, war industries and communities in order that there shall be no impairment of essential public health services;

(c) to undertake the responsibility for investigating conditions at first hand regarding civilian needs and the possibility of making such arrangements as are possible and expedient where there is an apparent conflict between military and civilian needs.

The board has been functioning for considerably over a year and a half. Under its auspices a complete study of the entire health services of Canada has been made, involving physicians, dentists, nurses, public health, medical research and industry. Every community in Canada has been investigated. To do this work, voluntary assistance was procured from all the provincial medical societies, the Canadian Dental Association, the Canadian Nurses Association, the Canadian Hospital Council, the deans of the nine medical schools, the Dominion Council of Health and the divisional advisory committees of the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board.

Each individual group carried out a survey of its special field. Twelve medical officers were loaned from the three armed services to act as field secretaries to these groups. In addition, the board had the active cooperation of the provincial departments of public health, the Department of Pensions and National

National Health

Health, the Department of Labour, the Department of National War Services and the three branches of the armed services.

These groups have been equally industrious in studying the needs of civilians as well as of the armed forces for medical man-power and woman-power. As a result of this study they have put into practical form a series of reports which give in detail a picture of the situation in Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific. And at the same time they have made that survey constructive in a series of practical recommendations respecting every feature of their work.

The reports consist of nine parts, each in a different volume and on a different subject. The tenth volume is a resume of recommendations. Each of the nine subjects was dealt with by a separate group and these reports were put together by the board at Ottawa.

Part 1-Introduction.

Part 2-Civilian Medical Man-power-

Medical Advisory Committees.

Part 3-Medical Schools-Association of Medical Colleges of Canada.

Part 4-Public Health-Dr. J. J. Heagerty.

Part 5-Hospital Personnel and Facilities- Dr. Harvey Agnew.

Part 6-Industrial Medicine-Dr. J. G. Cunningham.

Part 7-War Medical Man-power-Dr. A. E. Archer.

Part 8-Nurses-Miss K. W. Ellis.

Part 9-Dental Services-Dr. D. W. Gul-lett.

Part 10-Recommendations.

These ten volumes which I am tabling are necessarily voluminous. They contain about

350,000 words in all. Along with these reports I am tabling a summary prepared by the general secretary which I hope may be of assistance to the members of the house, the press, and the public. As the secretary indicates, the report is so detailed in its factual findings that really to summarize it would be an almost impossible task. And the summary therefore does not purport to be exhaustive; it simply brings attention to some of the salient points in the actual report.

Let me say that the report is not by any means in all respects complimentary. And I would ask that members take the trouble and time if they can possibly do so to read the report itself and not limit themselves to the summary alone.

One result of this reajly monumental effort was that every community, rural and urban, was surveyed in order to determine the present degree of medical care existing there. This 100-88J

revealed among other things details regarding the physicians, including numbers, location, nature of their work, population they are serving, availability for both civilian and military service, and existing surpluses and deficiencies.

Records have been established and a card index system set up making available for permanent use detailed information of Canada's civilian medical man-power such as has never been assembled before. These records are being kept up to date by the board.

For example, they show that in March, 1943, Canada's medical population totalled 12,235. Of this number 3,006 or about one-quarter, were in the armed forces. Of the remaining 9,229 physicians, 8,614 were practising, while 615 were retired. (As of March 1, 1944, there were 3,5S9 doctors in military service.)

With reference to medical schools: The

report reveals that although the staffs of full time instructors at such schools have declined by 18-5 per cent since 1939; nevertheless, an accelerated curriculum which has practically abolished holidays, has resulted in a great increase in the number of graduates.

In pre-war years these schools graduated an average of 491 students annually. From 1940 to 1944, this average has been stepped up to 630, an increase of nearly 30 per cent.

The report also shows the distribution of hospitals and devotes considerable attention to the post-war hospitalization needs of Canada.

This section of the report has particular reference to the matter of how any proposed health insurance plan might affect the hospital problem.

An examination of the report further discloses the type of health supervision which is being provided in industries and the need for an extension of such health facilities.

An interesting fact revealed by the report is that Canada has 52,4S3 registered nurses. Of these, more than half are not. engaged in nursing, nearly all of them being housewives. Of the balance of 27,574, 8,306 have expressed a willingness to enlist, but there is a waiting list of 3,741 nurses vrho are not at present needed by the armed services.

I think it can be confidently said that no other country in the world has had the benefit of a more complete or exhaustive study of its national health situation. It is of inestimable value not only now but for the future. Canada is greatly indebted to all the organizations and individuals I have mentioned, who have voluntarily given of their time and energy to carry out this most important undertaking.

National Health

And to all those who have participated in this major piece of useful national service, I wish to express sincere appreciation. The wealth of assistance has been contributed by hundreds, and probably thousands, of persons in the production of these reports. Rather than try to enumerate them in any number, I shall mention only one man, and his work can be said to be representative of the conscientious industry, the ample capacity, and the high devotion which has characterized the labour of all who have taken part. I refer to Doctor T. C. Routley, who has borne with outstanding ability the double load of secretary of the Canadian Medical association and general secretary of the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board.

The benefit of the effort of all these men and women will reach far beyond the realm of the armed forces to the wider field of -maintaining and improving the health of citizens throughout this Dominion. It goes without saying that health is fundamental and indeed indispensable to our prosperity as individuals and to our progress as a nation. I have made arrangements to have the report and the summary printed so that copies may be available to members of the house.

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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PC

Agar Rodney Adamson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. ADAMSON:

May I ask the minister a question? Does the report cover mental hygiene as well?

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I cannot tell my hon. friend what part of the report covers that subject, but it is covered.

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

Mr. Speaker, with unanimous consent of the house I would ask that we revert to the orders of the day, so that I may place on Hansard an answer to a question asked by the hon. member for Parkdale on Thursday, March 9. This question has to do with the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board, to which I referred this afternoon.

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

By unanimous consent we revert to orders of the day.

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

The question asked by the hon. member was with respect to the supplying of physicians from the armed forces to communities in certain special cases. I wish to say that the matter has been under intensive consideration by the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board and by the three services, the Department of

Pensions and National Health and the national selective service branch of the Department of Labour.

As a result of this examination, on March 2 the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board wrote to the premier of ' each province, with certain suggestions for a plan to help meet civilian requirements for medical personnel in communities where requirements were specially urgent. For the reason that the matter was one which involved consultation and agreement with the provinces, it was not intended that any public announcement should be made until the provinces had had an opportunity to examine the plan.

However, some publicity has already been given and, because of this and to prevent -misconceptions regarding what is being worked out, I consider it necessary to make a brief statement now:

On account of the requirements for medical personnel in connection with war activities, there was need for study of the requirements, both of the armed services and of communities, in order to endeavour to make the most of the available medical personnel. This study has been made by the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board.

The board, as I said this afternoon, was established on the 20th July, 1942, by P.C. 6185, and later its activities were extended to the dental and nursing services by P.C. 10360 of 17th November, 1942, and P.C. 10934 of 1st December, 1942. The board consisted of five members of the Canadian medical advisory committee (appointed by the Canadian Medical Association), the director of medical services of the Department of Pensions and National Health, the medical director of the Department of National War Services, a representative of the director of national selective service and the heads of the three medical services of navy, army and air, and the directors of dental service.

Among the functions of the board were:

(a) to make a survey and allocate as a result of information obtained medical officers in the proper proportions for appointment to the three branches of the armed forces of Canada;

(b) to consider carefully in relation to the available supply of physicians for appointment to the armed forces the requirements of civilian institutions, public health departments, medical schools, war industries and communities in order that there shall be no impairment of essential public health services;

(c) to undertake the responsibility for investigating conditions at first hand regarding

National Health

civilian needs and the possibility of making such arrangements as are possible and expedient where there is an apparent conflict between military and civilian needs.

In certain oases the needs of communities have become extremely urgent and some method was sought whereby consideration could be given to these exceptional cases. A plan has been evolved, with the objective of making available, on terms to be arranged with the provinces, a limited number of medical personnel to civilian communities, whose needs for medical services may be very exceptional and urgent.

The basis of the plan is:-

(a) That the provinces request the furnishing of medical personnel in particular communities where it is alleged that there is urgent need;

(b) That the need is established through

the advice of the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board-this board being advised by its local advisory committee in the province; .

(c) That the province, by arrangement witli the municipality or otherwise, will reimburse the receiver general on the basis of pay and allowances actually paid to the medical officer and with provision for any other expenses which may be specified;

(d) That medical personnel be allotted from one of the armed services for the purpose of supplying, under the arrangement indicated, the medical personnel, the need for whom has been so established;

(e) The armed services plan to replace the medical personnel so provided to civilian communities by admitting into the armed services younger qualified doctors who have previously been rejected because they were in some of the lower medical categories. It is proposed also to use in the armed services in Canada a larger number of doctors within the call-up age group who have previously been deferred or rejected. An endeavour will be made to obtain these medical men in communities from which they can be spared, as advised by the Canadian medical procurement and assignment board.

I should make it perfectly clear that this does not mean that there is any surplus of medical officers in the armed services. I need not say that, if there is any surplus, it will be utilized for the purposes indicated. But at the present, and with the prospective requirements of this year, it cannot be hoped that the armed forces can supply these medical personnel without having them replaced. However, with the doctors who are coming into the services as they graduate, together with the calling up

of others who have previously been deferred or rejected, it would -appear as if it would be practicable to make a limited number of the older and more experienced officers in the services available to help to supply urgent civilian needs.

I want to emphasize also that this number will be limited and it will certainly only be possible to supply men where the need is established as really urgent. The services will not be able to supply men for all communities where a doctor might be wanted to keep up the number who would be normally practising there under peace-time conditions. I should think it likely that it would only be possible to give consideration to those communities who have recently lost a doctor from one cause or another, and only in those places where the need is very apparent after taking account of what physicians may be available at nearby points.

Two advantages will be gained by retaining in uniform the doctors who are thus made available. First, they can be directed to communities where they are most urgently needed while being assured of reasonable economic security. Second, they will remain subject to service in the armed forces if at any time the need for them should become more urgent.

As I have indicated at the beginning, this plan cannot be made final until arrangements are concluded with the provinces. I shall give the house additional information when the matter is sufficiently developed to warrant a further statement.

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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SC

Frederick Davis Shaw

Social Credit

Mr. F. D. SHAW (Red Deer):

May I ask the Minister of National Defence a question? Was any consideration given to the granting of permission to alien doctors to practise? I understand this has been done in the United States and in Great Britain, but that they have been refused permission here. I refer to men who have come to Canada, fully qualified, since the outbreak of the war. 1 understand there are some who are doing clerical work.

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I cannot say to my hon. friend that consideration has been given to them.

Mr. G. J.TUSTIN (Prince fldward-Lennox): I was glad to hear the statement by the minister. Has any consideration been given to dentists? In some sections (here is a great shortage of dentists.

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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

No, I do not think in connection with this plan any consideration has been given to dentists. I will take the matter up, to see if it is possible to make some similar arrangement.

t39S

Questions

Topic:   NATIONAL HEALTH
Subtopic:   REPORT ON SURVEY MADE BY MEDICAL PROCUREMENT AND ASSIGNMENT BOARD
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March 13, 1944