March 3, 1944

LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

If the hon. member would wait until we get to health of animals we shall have those figures. It is eight years since I became minister.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

Is the best treatment for this disease to kill the animal, or can the disease be combated successfully by other means?

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

I stated a few moments ago that if the calf vaccine is used early enough, when the animal is from four to six months old, it is possible to check the disease to a certain extent, but as animals get older it is thought best to kill them.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

Have any other methods of taking care of this disease been discovered?

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

We have a Bang's disease control policy, but I repeat that the general idea is that when once an animal is marked as being afflicted with the disease the best thing to do is to kill it. There are quite a number of herds in Canada which are Bang's disease free. Animals have become marked and the owners simply have got rid of them.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

My experience has shown that even though diseased animals are cleaned out of the herd, other animals continue to get the disease. Has that been the experience all over Canada?

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The fact that an animal has been afflicted and destroyed is not a guarantee that the rest of the herd will not become infected from some other source. That is possible at all times.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

The minister has promised to bring down figures showing the losses on account of this disease.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The number of animals slaughtered.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

There is another phase which concerns dairy animals particularly. When such an animal is infected the milk production is affected and there is great loss. Has any computation been made of that loss? The minister has stated that one of the means of controlling Bang's disease and hemorrhagic septicaemia is to adopt sanitary measures. I realize that those measures would be quite effective, but has anything been done to acquaint live stock producers with what sanitary controls are necessary? Is any literature being circulated?

There is another question I should like to ask. What laboratory facilities are available in the department at the present time? Where are these laboratories located and how are they manned? I suppose they are manned by veterinary surgeons, but are these men qualified to do research work? I should like a general statement on the laboratory situation throughout the country.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The main laboratory dealing with Bang's disease is just across the river in Hull. Then there is one at Lethbridge and one in British Columbia, just outside Victoria. They met with considerable success in their experiments. The material which I placed on Hansard this evening emphasizes that sanitary control is the important thing. That is true also with diseases that afflict hogs. Many farmers make a practice of not running hogs too long in the same yard. They move them from place to place in order to avoid having them become afflicted. There are pamphlets sent out covering all these things, and they go out by the thousands to farmers all over the country. They show the farmers how to take care of their flocks of sheep, their litters of hogs and their herds of cattle. The farmers are encouraged to write in for these pamphlets.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

Many farmers who are in trouble with these diseases do not know that these pamphlets are available. Is any advertising done to acquaint the farmers with where they can obtain these pamphlets? The minister has stated that a number of herds are free from Bang's disease. I understand the

Supply-Agriculture

United States accepts the blood tests made on Canadian cattle. The minister also referred to the vaccination of calves at a certain age. As I understand it, this vaccine contains live organisms, and I should like to know if this vaccine remains effective until an animal reaches maturity. I understand that these organisms are never entirely absent from an animal. I think the minister understands what I am getting at.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The information I have is that they do not colonize in the calf and that as a result they are not found in the animal when a test is made in later life. They do not carry it on through.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

Do they establish immunity?

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

Yes, they establish immunity. There was some question in the minds of officials of this department in the earlier stages in the use of the treatment, but I think they have come to agree that there is considerable merit in it and that it does establish immunity. Of course, one cannot be sure how long that immunity will last.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

I do not think it is permanent.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

Wilbert Franklin (Frank) Rickard

Liberal

Mr. RICKARD:

Have these calves been vaccinated when under six months of age? Has the department had experience with the vaccine when the calves are eight months old? Will they be free from Bang's disease after that age, or is it only up to six months?

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The treatment has been proven in experiments up to eight months, and experiments are being made with older animals. It has been pretty well established that the treatment is effective up to eight months.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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LIB

Wilbert Franklin (Frank) Rickard

Liberal

Mr. RICKARD:

Does it take longer to clear up after eight months?

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

Slightly longer.

Topic:   NATIONAL FLAG
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO ANSWER TO QUESTION ON FEBRUARY 28
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March 3, 1944