March 2, 1944

NAT

Mr. CARDIFF:

National Government

1. Has the government acquired the property know-n as Calderwood, at Union St., in the village of Portsmouth, Ontario?

2. If so, -when, and w-hat was the purchase price?

3. To whom is the property leased at the present time?

4. What is the period or term of the present lease?

5. Who is occupying the property at the present time?

6. What rent is being paid per month for this property?

7. Is this property suitable for government purposes?

8. If not, why?

Topic:   PURCHASE OF PROPERTY IN PORTSMOUTH, ONT.
Permalink
LIB

Mr. FOURNIER (Hull): (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. Property purchased in 1919 for $15,000.

3. 10-24 acres of property with building thereon leased to and occupied by W. Rupert Davies, remainder used by Department of Justice for quarry purposes in connection with penitentiary.

4. Five years from September 1, 1943.

5. Answered by No. 3.

6. $25 a month, lessee to pay all repairs and upkeep of property, as well as taxes and local improvements.

7 and 8. Property was purchased for military hospital purposes and used for approximately one year, after which it was occupied by the Department of National Defence until 1926. Since then the property has not been found suitable for any existing government purpose.

Topic:   PURCHASE OF PROPERTY IN PORTSMOUTH, ONT.
Permalink

COLD STORAGE-KINGSTON

NAT

Mr. CARDIFF:

National Government

1. What is the total amount paid by the dominion government for cold storage purposes in the city of Kingston, Ontario?

2. To whom were these grants paid?

3. On wl^at dates were they paid?

Topic:   COLD STORAGE-KINGSTON
Permalink
LIB

Mr. GARDINER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. $3,921.55.

2. Kingston Cold Storage, Kingston, Ontario-

3. August 29, 1940; June 26, 1941; August 24, 1942; October 4, 1943.

Questions

Topic:   COLD STORAGE-KINGSTON
Permalink

NATIONAL INCOME-PROFITS OF INCORPORATED COMPANIES, ETC.

CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

.. For each of the years 1938 to 1943 inclusive, what was: 1. (a) national income at factor cost; (b) gross national product; (c) total of income payments to individuals?

2. (a) Total of income paid out in salaries and wages; (b) total of payments to men and women in the services, and whether same is included in 2 (a); (c) total net income of enterprises, (i) agricultural; (ii) other?

3. Total investment income?

4. Total profits of incorporated companies?

5. (a) Total of, undistributed profits of said companies; (b) total of depreciation and other reserves of said companies?

Topic:   NATIONAL INCOME-PROFITS OF INCORPORATED COMPANIES, ETC.
Permalink
LIB

Mr. MacKINNON (Edmonton West): (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. (a)

1938 $4,291,158,000

1939 4,553,662,000

1940 5,404,154,000

1941 6,500,000,000

1942 7,500,000,000

1943 (Estimated) .... 8,800,000,000

(b) *

1938 $5,226,816,000

1939 5,498,997,000

1940 6,383,022,000

1941 7,585,919,000

1942 8,694,578,000

1943 (Estimated at).. 10,140,000,000

(c)

1938 $4,133,618,000

1939 4,344,216,000

1940 4,944,284,000

1941 5,873,429,000

1942 7,090,068,000

1943 Unavailable

2. (a)

1938 $2,454,348,000

1939 2,604,519,000

1940 3,081,980,000

1941 3,812,884,000

1942 4,806,326,000

1943 Unavailable.

(b)

Pay and allowances, clothing, personal equipment and rations of armed forces serving in Canada. Fiscal year ended March 31, 1940; $50,120,000. Fiscal year ended March 111, 1941, $199,883,000. Fiscal year ended March 31, 1942, $306,480,000. Fiscal year ended March 31, 1943, unavailable. These computations are included in 2 (a).

IMr. Gardiner.]

(c) Computation in course of revision.

3.

1938 $622,873,000

1939 644,939,000

1940 660,742,000

1941 749,929,000

1942 Unavailable

1943 Unavailable

4. Profits of 628 large incorporated companies as published in October-November number 1943, of statistical summary of the Bank of Canada: .

1938 $268,700,000

1939 327,800,000

1940 337,000,000

1941 379,900,000

1942 379,400,000

1943 Unavailable

5. (a) Undistributed profits of said companies as published in October-November number 1943, of statistical summary of the Bank of Canada:

1938 $ 19,000,000

1939 88,000,000

1940 ' 98,000,000

1941 141,000,000

1942 127,000,000

5. (b) Total of depreciation, deferred development and patent write-offs as published in October-November number 1943, of statistical summary of the Bank of Canada:

1938 $124,000,000

1939 135,000,000

1940 162,000,000

1941 206,000,000

1942 264,000,000

1943 Unavailable

Topic:   NATIONAL INCOME-PROFITS OF INCORPORATED COMPANIES, ETC.
Permalink

METALS CONTROL-ALUMINUM

NAT

Mr. ROSS (St. Paul's):

National Government

1. How many permits or releases have been issued or granted by the metals controller, under "Order No. M.C. 44, Aluminum", for the use, delivery, transfer or sale of basic aluminum, or wrought aluminum, or aluminum products, between March 6, 1943, and January 31, 1944; and to whom were such permits and releases issued?

2. How many reports have been filed with the metals controller under the provisions of section 6 of Order No. M.C. 44?

Topic:   METALS CONTROL-ALUMINUM
Permalink
LIB

Mr. CHEVRIER: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. (a) Number of releases, 6,175; (b) Number of users, 642. It is not the policy of the Department to give names of citizens or firms to whom permits or releases have been issued.

2. 3,711.

Questions

Topic:   METALS CONTROL-ALUMINUM
Permalink

FIFTH PAN-AMERICAN HIGHWAYS CONFERENCE- PERU

NAT
LIB

Mr. MACKENZIE KING: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

1. To date no official invitation has been received.

2. Answered by No. 1.

Topic:   FIFTH PAN-AMERICAN HIGHWAYS CONFERENCE- PERU
Permalink

JAPANESE NATIONALS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA- EMPLOYMENT IN FORESTS ON CROWN LANDS

NAT

Mr. ROSS (St. Paul's):

National Government

1. Does order in council P.C. 1422, dated

23rd day of February, 1943, override the authority of the statutes of the province of British Columbia? , _____

2. Does the said order P.C. 1422 of 1943 authorize the employment of persons of Japanese origin in the forests on crown lands held in the right of the province of British Columbia?

3. If so, how many persons of Japanese origin have been so employed?

Topic:   JAPANESE NATIONALS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA- EMPLOYMENT IN FORESTS ON CROWN LANDS
Permalink
LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MARTIN:

1 and 2. Order in council P.C. 1422 provides: "From and after the date of this order and for the duration of the emergency created by the present war no statute of the province of British Columbia and no order in council made pursuant to any such statute or otherwise and no term or condition contained in any contract, lease, licence or concession or other instrument shall operate to disqualify or prohibit any person of Asiatic racial origin, wherever born, from employment in any capacity in the timber industry in the province of British Columbia and no one employing any such person in any such capacity in the timber industry in the said province shall, by reason of any provision in any such statute, order in council, contract, lease, licence, concession or other instrument, be subject to any penalty, forfeiture or other liability."

3. Approximately 1,200 persons of Japanese origin are employed in British Columbia woods operations on production of lumber, fuelwood, etc. The department has no means of knowing how many of these are working for employers carrying on operations on crown lands as distinct from privately-owned lands.

Topic:   JAPANESE NATIONALS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA- EMPLOYMENT IN FORESTS ON CROWN LANDS
Permalink

SELECTIVE SERVICE-FARM WORKERS

LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

What steps have been taken by the Department of Labour to ensure a more effective application of the national selective service regulations designed to retain workers on the farm?

Topic:   SELECTIVE SERVICE-FARM WORKERS
Permalink
LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MARTIN:

Changes have been made in both the civilian and mobilization regulations for making more effective the policy of

stabilizing employment in agriculture and steps have been taken to ensure improvement in the administration of this policy.

The original national selective service civilian regulations (order in council P.C. 7595, August 28, 1942), permitted men from farms to work outside of agriculture for not more than 30 consecutive days without securing a permit from an employment and selective service office. This meant that a ' farmer could- accept non-agricultural employment for several periods during the year not exceeding thirty days each without having to obtain a permit.

An improvement in this regulation was effected in the amendment to the national selective service civilian regulations (order in council P.C. 246, January 19, 1943). This amendment dropped the 30 consecutive day provision and replaced it with a clause, stating that farm workers could not accept employment outside of agriculture without securing a permit if that employment were taken in an urban centre of over 5,000 population. They were allowed to take employment outside of agriculture for 60 days in a calendar year without obtaining a permit when such employment was not in an urban centre of over 5,000 population, but only at such periods when they could) be spared from the farms.

Several circulars have gone out to employment offices emphasizing the necessity for keeping men on the farms, containing specific instructions that regulations designed to accomplish this were to be rigidly enforced.

In the spring of 1943 men with practical experience and training in agriculture were appointed as agricultural employment advisers in the different regions. One of their jobs is to keep the local employment offices constantly informed of farm labour requirements and to see that regulations governing employment in agriculture are fully understood and effectively carried out by the local offices.

When the- national selective service policy was introduced in March, 1942, an important change was made in the mobilization regulations so that these regulations would conform to the general policy of retaining essential man power on farms. This change included a>. special provision for the postponement of military training for farm worKers, as distinct from the method to be used in granting-postponements for men in all other industries.

Reference has already been made in the house to the interpretative letter which was sent in February, 1943, by the director of national selective service to the chairmen of all the mobilization boards. This letter dealt exclusively with the problems of farm labour. The letter emphasized the shortage of labour

Questions

for the farms, the urgent need for retaining essential man power on the farms, and the special status of farm workers under the regulations. The including of a special provision for postponing farm workers followed by the letter to the boards has resultedi in more favourable consideration by all boards of farmers' applications for postponements. The percentage of applications which are not granted is now very small.

All mobilization boards make use of information collected on a farm questionnaire for each man applying for a postponement. This information provides full details of the extent of his farming operations, and any special circumstances which may influence the decisions of the boards.

The mobilization boards are using to an increasing degree, provincial departments of agriculture field staffs and local committees for securing reports on the essentiality of farm workers who apply for postponement. This coordination was given an added impetus this past summer when meetings organized by the Department of Labour were held with the different mobilization boards and the interested provincial and regional selective service officials. The object of these meetings was to discuss all aspects of the farm labour problem with a view to determining where the farm labour organizations might be helpful to the boards and the boards might be helpful to the farm labour organizations, and to secure the most effective use of men postponed as essential agricultural workers. This has resulted in a considerable transfer of farm wmrkers to other farms requiring help, when after investigation, of their applications for postponement, such men were not found to be needed on their own farms.

Topic:   SELECTIVE SERVICE-FARM WORKERS
Permalink

March 2, 1944