March 2, 1944

FIFTH SESSION-NINETEENTH PARLIAMENT 8 GEORGE VI, 1944 VOLUME II, 1944 COMPRISING THE PERIOD FROM THE SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1944, TO THE SEVENTEENTH DAY OF APRIL, 1944, INCLUSIVE BEING VOLUME CCXL FOR THE PERIOD 1875-1944 INDEX ISSUED IN A SEPARATE VOLUME OTTAWA EDMOND CLOUTIER PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 1944 CANADA


i>ouSe of Commons debates



Thursday, March 2, 1944


WAR EXPENDITURES

CHANGE IN PERSONNEL OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That the name of Mr. Factor be substituted for that of Mr. Gladstone on the war expenditures committee.

Topic:   WAR EXPENDITURES
Subtopic:   CHANGE IN PERSONNEL OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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Motion agreed to.


IMMIGRATION


PETITION FROM '*LA SOCIETE SAINT-JEAN BAPTISTE DE QUEBEC" PROTESTING AGAINST ANY IMMIGRATION On the order for motions: Mr. WILFRID LaCROIX (Quebec-Montmoreney) (Translation): Mr. Speaker, I wish to submit to the House of Commons a petition from the "Societe Saint-Jean Baptiste de Quebec", bearing a total of 162,889 signatures and directed to the honourable members of the House of Commons in parliament assembled. The said petition strongly protests against any immigration, demands that the strict enforcement of immigration bans be continued, opposes the issuing of special or discretionary permits for admission into this country, and lastly, urges the Canadian government to take whatever action may be necessary with a view to preventing any immigration into this country. Here is one set of petitions from the city of Quebec, bearing 42,421 signatures; one from the county of Kamouraska with 9,006 signatures; one from the county of Mont-magny with 7,049 signatures; one from the county of Megantic with 9,147 signatures; one from the county of L'lslet with 7,654 signatures; one from the county of Quebec with 11,084 signatures; one from the county of Beauce with 18,976 signatures; one from the county of Montmorency with 4,279 signatures; one from the county of Dorchester with 9,282 signatures; one from the county 100-66 of Lotbiniere with 6,190 signatures; one from the county of Levis with 11,555 signatures; one from the county of Portneuf with 11,410 signatures; one from the county of Riviere du Loup with 5,141 signatures; one from the county represented by the genial member for Bellechasse (Mr. Picard) with 7,168 signatures, and many others.


DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT

INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS FOR THE POOR


Mr. ROBERT FAIR (Battle River) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 8, to amend the Dominion Elections Act, 1938. He said: Paragraph (k) subsection 2 of section 14 of the Dominion Elections Act, 1938, reads as follows: (k) in any province, every person who is an inmate of an institution which is maintained by any government or municipality for the housing and maintenance of the poor, if such person is by the law of that province disqualified from voting at an election of a member of the legislative assembly of that province, and did not serve in the military, naval or air forces of Canada in the war of 1914-1918. I contend that this disqualification should not be in the elections act of any democratic country, and the purpose of this bill is to have that particular clause removed before the next election. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk)


SHIPBUILDING-COSTS IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY-OWNED PLANTS

NAT

Mr. FRASER (Peterborough West):

National Government

1. What are the names and addresses of the 14 major steel yards, as mentioned in Votes and Proceedings, Wednesday, 2Gth January, 1944, page 776, building ships, in Canada?

2. What are the names and addresses of the five smaller steel yards, as mentioned in Votes and Proceedings, Wednesday, 26th January, 1944, page 776, building ships in Canada?

3. What are the names and addresses of the 62 shipyards building wooden ships in Canada, as mentioned in Votes and Proceedings, Wednesday, 26th January, 1944, page 776?

Questions

4. What are the names and addresses of the outfitting yards, as mentioned in Votes and Proceedings, Wednesday, 26th January, 1944, page 776?

5. How many of these companies are government owned?

6. If privately owned, what are the names of the companies, and * what are the names of the directorates of each company?

7. Does it cost more to build a ship of the 10,350-ton class in a government-owned plant than in a privately-owned plant?

8. Does it cost more to build a ship of the 4,700-ton class in a government-owned shipbuilding plant than in a privately-owned plant?

9. What is the differential in total cost (including extras) between ships constructed in government-owned yards or plants and in privately-owned yards or plants for ships, (a) of 10,350-ton class; (b) of 4,700-ton class?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SHIPBUILDING-COSTS IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY-OWNED PLANTS
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LIB

Mr. CHEVRIER: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. It is not in the public interest to give the

specific location of Canada's shipyards. The answers to this question denote the province only where such shipyards are located:

Yarrows Limited, British Columbia.

Canadian Vickers Limited, province of Quebec.

Davie Shipbuilding & Repairing Co. Ltd., province of Quebec.

Geo. T. Davie & Sons Ltd., province of Quebec.

Morton Engineering & Drydock Co. Ltd., province of Quebec.

Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Ontario.

The Collingwood Shipyards Limited, Ontario.

Midland Shipyards Limited, Ontario.

Toronto Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Ontario.

Kingston Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Ontario.

Halifax Shipyards Limited, Nova Scotia.

Government-owned outfitting yard operated by Anglo-Canadian Pulp & Paper Mills Ltd., Shipbuilding Division, province of Quebec.

Government-owned outfitting yard operated by Carter-Halls Aldinger Co. Limited, Ontario. [DOT]

Government-owned outfitting yard operated by Canadian Comstock Co. Limited, New Brunswick.

Note; A government-owned company, Quebec Shipyards Limited, supervises the Morton Engineering & Drydock Company, Geo. T. Davie & Sons Limited, and the government-owned outfitting yard operated by Anglo-Canadian Pulp & Paper Mills Ltd., shipbuilding division, in the province of Quebec.

2. Canadian Dredge & Dock Co. Ltd., Ontario.

Canadian Bridge Co. Ltd., Ontario.

Central Bridge Co. Ltd., Ontario.

Russel Bros. Ltd., Ontario.

Montreal Drydock Co. Ltd., province of Quebec.

3. Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co. Ltd., Nova Scotia.

M. R. Chappell, Nova Scotia.

Clare Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Nova Scotia.

H. Clarke, Prince Edward Island.

Eastern Woodworkers, Nova Scotia.

J. Etherington, Nova Scotia.

Foundation Maritime Limited, Nova Scotia. Industrial Shipping Ltd., Nova Scotia.

J. D. Irving & Co., New Brunswick. Leblanc Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Nova Scotia.

K. MacAlpine & Sons, Nova Scotia.

W. C. McKay & Sons, Nova Scotia.

S. G. Mason, Nova Scotia.

McMulkin & Sons & Ashley Coulter, New Brunswick.

Palmer & Williams, Prince Edward Island. Walter Pinaud, Nova Scotia.

S. S. Rafuse, Nova Scotia.

Shelburne Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Nova Scotia.

Silver's Agencies Ltd., Nova Scotia.

Smith & Rhuland, Nova Scotia.

J. A. Urquhart, Nova Scotia.

Vaughan Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., New Brunswick.

Wagstaff '& Hatfield, Nova Scotia.

Laurent Berger, province of Quebec. Canada Plycraft, province of Quebec. Chantier Maritime du Sti Laurent Ltee., province of Quebec.

J. A. Doucet, province of Quebec.

F. X. Lachance, province of Quebec.

Les Canots Cadorettes, province of Quebec. Bordeur Bros. & Gould, Ontario.

Dawson Boat Works, Ontario.

Duke Boats, Ontario.

Gordon Boat Works, Ontario.

J. A. Grant & Sons, Ontario.

Greavette Boats Ltd., Ontario.

Grew Boats Ltd., Ontario.

Howard Furnace & Foundries Ltd., Ontario. Hunter Boats, Ontario.

W. J. Johnson, Ontario.

MacCraft Co. Limited, Ontario.

McCall & Company, Ontario.

Midland Boat Works, Ontario.

Minett Shields, Ontario.

Morris Boat Works, Ontario.

Norse Boat & Ski, Ontario.

S. H. Perry & Sen, Ontario.

Port Carling Boat Works, Ontario. Peterborough Canoe Co., Ontario.

Rice Lake Boat Works, Ontario.

C. Richardson, Ontario.

J. J. Taylor & Sons, Ontario.

Armstrong Bros. Ltd., British Columbia. Beach Avenue Shipyards, British Columbia. A. C. Benson, British Columbia.

Dominion Construction Co., British Columbia.

Questions

McKenzie Barge & Derrick Co. Ltd., British Columbia.

Newcastle Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., British Columbia.

Prince Rupert Drydock Co. Ltd., British Columbia.

Star Shipyard (Mercer's) Ltd., British Columbia.

Vancouver Shipyards Ltd., British Columbia. Victoria Motor Boat Co. Ltd., British Columbia.

A. J. Jones Ltd., British Columbia.

4. Government-owned outfitting yard operated

by Anglo-Canadian Pulp & Paper Mills Ltd., Shipbuilding Division, province of Quebec.

Government-owned outfitting yard operated by Carter-Halls Aldinger Co. Limited, Ontario.

Government-owned outfitting yard operated by Canadian Comstock Co. Limited, New Brunswick.

5. Assuming that "these" refers to the yards

spoken of in Question 1, the answer is: Four, as follows:

Toronto Shipbuilding Company Limited, Ontario.

Quebec Shipyards Limited, province of Quebec, supervising the operations of Morton Engineering & Drydock Company, Geo. T. Davie & Sons Ltd,, and the outfitting yard operated by Anglo-Canadian Pulp & Paper Mills Limited, Shipbuilding Division. Government-owned outfitting yard operated by Carter-Halls Aldinger Co. Limited, Ontario.

Government-owned outfitting yard operated by Canadian Comstock Co. Limited, New Brunswick.

6. All other companies are privately owned.

Names of directorates of each company are not known.

7. From such tentative figures as are available, it appears that the most expensive ship at United Shipyards Limited exceeded the cos,t of the most expensive ship in any of the privately-owned yards. Also it appears that later ships at United Shipyards Limited are not costing more than the cost in some privately-owned yards. See also the minister's statement on ship costs, pages 759, 760 and 761, daily Hansard of February 22, 1944.

8. Three yards have been building 4,700-ton ships. Two of these are privately-owned and operated and in the case of the third, the plant is owned by the government but operated by a private company on a fee basis. From tentative figures available it

100-66J

appears that the costs in the government-owned plant are higher than in the other two yards. We have reason to believe that later ships in the government-owned yard will not cost more than ships built at the same date in the privately-owned yards. It should be considered that the company operating the government-owned plant on a fee basis is producing these 4,700-ton ships in about one-half the number of days taken by the other two yards. See also the minister's statement on ship costs, pages 759, 760 and 761, daily Hansard, February 22, 1944.

9. The differential cannot now be determined. See answers to questions 7 and 8.

Note: It should be noted that the first six questions asked refer to Votes and Proceedings, page 776, dated the 26th of January, 1944, and have reference to yards employed on naval work only, and do not include any of the yards employed on cargo work. In the Votes and Proceedings the 14 yards are specifically mentioned as presently engaged on naval ships.

Questions 7, 8 and 9 refer to cargo ships being built in other yards, some of which, are government-owned.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SHIPBUILDING-COSTS IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY-OWNED PLANTS
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WHEAT USED BY MILLERS

NAT

Mr. ROSS (Souris):

National Government

1. How many bushels of wheat were used by millers of Canada during each of the years 1942 and 1943?

2. What was the actual cost per bushel to the miller?

3. What amount per bushel was taken care of by government subsidy in each year?

4. What is the government subsidy at present allowed per bushel for wheat used by millers?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT USED BY MILLERS
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LIB

Mr. MacKINNON (Edmonton West): (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. 1942-93,134,762 bushels; 1943-108,448,431' bushels.

2. No information.

3. Per bushel amount by months:

Crop year 1942-43 Spring wheat Durum wheat

Cents per bu. Cents per bu.

August

HI IlfSeptember ...

12* 14*October

12| 178November ...

13* 18|December

134 13fJanuary

134 188February

134 264March

194 374April

21| 314May

218 328June

244 328July

314 36|

Questions

Crop year 1943-44 Spring wheat Durum wheat Cents per bu. Cents per bu.

August

33| 41iSeptember

388 468October

468 52iNovember

478 528December

478 52|January

478 52|

The above per bushel amounts are based upon the excess of the monthly average prices of No. 1 northern and No. 1 C. W. durum wheat in store Fort William-Port Arthur over the domestic ceiling price of 77| cents per bushel. Payments have been made on 35,559,570 bushels of spring wheat and on 1,064,489 bushels of durum wheat in the 1942-43 crop year, and on 25,752,384 bushels of spring wheat and on 510,956 bushels of durum wheat to date in the 1943-44 crop year, with the January, 1944, payments still incomplete.

4. For spring wheat-478 cents per bushel. For durum wheat-528 cents per bushel.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT USED BY MILLERS
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March 2, 1944