July 13, 1943

NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Does the Japanese government allow representatives of the International Red Cross committee to make investigations and visit prisoners of war in that country as a normal part of their procedure?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Permalink
NAT

Grote Stirling

National Government

Mr. STIRLING:

Can the Prime Minister give us any information, either from Red Cross sources or from any other, as to the position of the Canadian civilian in Japan? Is he allowed his liberty, is he interned, is he working? The reason I ask the question is that I should like to be in a position to make a comparison between the way in which the Canadian is treated in Japan and the way in which the Japanese are treated in Canada.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The question is a wide one. I am not in a position to give information at the moment, but at some subsequent time perhaps I shall be able to do so.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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NAT

Howard Charles Green

National Government

Mr. GREEN:

Last night the Prime Minister said he would try to get the figures on the number of Japanese in Canada who have asked to be repatriated. Can he give those figures to-day?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I will try to have all particulars asked for last night given to the committee this afternoon when we come again to the war appropriation bill. They were asked in that connection and I was holding the information until that time.

72537-297i

The total number of Canadians in the far east at present is approximately 1,000.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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NAT
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes. In Europe, 1,120. Of internees, there are in the far east 163 and in Europe 300.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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Item agreed to. Canada's contributions to maintenance of external organizations. 48. Expenses of the League of Nations for 1943, including secretariat, international labour organization and permanent court of international justice, $125,700.


NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

I have already expressed my opinion on the League of Nations, but I do not see why there is any reason for the league's useless existence at all at the present time. It is fulfilling no useful function. Secondly, with regard to the permanent international court of justice, I suggest that Russia is not going to wait for the establishment of any court of justice out here in America, which is thousands of miles away from the scenes of slaughter. A million Polish Jews have been taken to the abattoir in Poland and other places, and Russia will deal with the situation on the spot and execute those responsible before any court of justice can sit. As regards the other feature of this whole question, we are still expending money on the League of Nations, and all I can say is that I do not believe in it and never did. I do not believe in this form of collective security. We can see similar ideals of other great empires in the past propounded in the days of such writers as Gibbon and later Bryce, and for my part I have no confidence in them, because I am firmly convinced that nothing will ensure our safety in the future so much as the British navy and British arms. So long as Britain is armed you may be sure that we shall have collective security, and that security is immeasurably strengthened by the fleet. After all, the Monroe doctrine was just the British fleet for a hundred years. It is but an ideal.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

Are the members of the league meeting just now and what members are meeting? Where are they meeting and why the increase this year?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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mendation of the international labour conference held in New York in 1941, that a special grant of 1,000,000 Swiss francs should be provided for the international labour office for the study of .post-war reconstruction. The international labour office has been proceeding with its programme of study in accordance with this recommendation and the amounts necessary to cover the work done in 1942 and to be achieved this year are both included in the league budget for 1943. Another reason for the current increase has been that certain states under axis control gave, over two years ago, notice of their retirement, and this notice has now become effective, thus reducing the potential contributors to the support of the league institutions. The league is financed by assessing against each member state a certain number of units of contribution based roughly on each state's capacity to pay. Canada has for many years been assessed 35 units. Most of the satellite European states under axis control have ceased to be members of the league and the contributions assessed against the allied European governments whose territories have been overrun by the enemy have been reduced to token figures. Hence the total number of units of contribution has been sharply reduced and the member states in the British commonwealth, Latin America and elsewhere whose territories have not been overrun by the enemy bear a higher proportion of the total budget. My hon. friend is aware that the international labour office is at present located in Montreal and is carrying on its business there, and has had various meetings. The league assembly and the council are not in being at this time. Item agreed to. 44. Portion of expenditure of the imperial economic committee, $1,575.


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

What are the total expenses connected with the imperial economic committee, and who share the balance of the expenses which are incurred? I see that our portion is $1,575. Perhaps the Prime Minister would give the committee some further details as to what the committee exercises its jurisdiction over.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   OOMM'ONS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   OOMM'ONS
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

To what kind of

work does this committee devote its attention?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   OOMM'ONS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

At the moment the committee is existing more or less in a skeleton form. In ordinary times its work consists in sharing as between the different parts of the British empire information on important economic matters of mutual interest and concern.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   OOMM'ONS
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

While I realize the

Prime Minister must answer in general terms, the members of the committee have no possible way of determining what kind of work this committee is doing. Are they, for example, endeavouring to learn how the nations of the empire can trade to better advantage, how they can overcome adverse trade balances, how they can repay international debts -all that sort of thing-or are they devoting their time to finding out where they can be producing sugar, wool or other products? I should like to know what this committee is, what it has done for us, and whether we are justified in supporting it.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   OOMM'ONS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Here again

may I say to my hon. friend that, where reports are in existence, which contain detailed

Supply-External Affairs

information, it is reasonable to expect that hon. members will consult the reports. The reports of this committee have been tabled, they are in the library, they give the details. In general terms, the work is largely statistical, the gathering of statistical information which will be of service to different parts of the empire on economic questions. I cannot tell my hon. friend from memory what particular statistics are being or have been gathered. But it is one of those organizations which is a helpful reference organization on matters of economic importance and interest to all parts of the British commonwealth.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   OOMM'ONS
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Item agreed to. J/S. Portion of expenses of international wheat council, $2,775.


July 13, 1943