July 13, 1943

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The whole question of air routes after the war is one of the most important and at the same time one of the largest questions which not only this government but all the governments have to face. For some time past there has been consideration of matters related to the question. of aviation in its different aspects, but I would not wish to describe what has taken place thus far as being in the nature of negotiations. The stage of negotiations has not been reached, but the whole subject is being considered very carefully so that when the time does come to discuss these matters in a final way the government will be fully informed and prepared to make its own decision in respect thereto.

Supply-External Affairs

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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NAT

Howard Charles Green

National Government

Mr. GREEN:

Is the government giving consideration to a trans-Pacific route as well as a trans-Atlantic route?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I think I might say that all possible routes are being considered and their possibilities explored.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

I do not think the Prime Minister answered a question I asked the other day in connection with post-war aviation, with particular reference to the convening of a conference that was reported in t'he press in a dispatch from Washington, dated July 8, reading in part as follows:

Discussions among British commonwealth countries on the broad subject of post-war aviation are being proposed by the British government, it was reported here to-day.

The meeting, likely to be held in London, will precede any aviation conference among the united nations.

Is the Prime Minister in a position to advise whether negotiations are at present going on with the British government for the convening of that conference?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My hon. friend has heard of fishing expeditions. There are members of the press in all countries who are anxious to find out what is going on in other countries. I regard the press report to which reference has been made, as I said in the house the other day, as flying a kite with a view to drawing information from this administration that might be used elsewhere for purposes that might serve certain ends but perhaps not all the ends that we would wish to see served. I prefer to say nothing at this time in reply to the question my hon. friend has asked, but he may be sure that with respect to all of these most important post-war questions careful consideration is being given to the proper steps to be taken as between t'he different governments concerned.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

The Prime Minister has covered a wide range in discussing the objectives behind these inquiries in connection with international air routes. When I raised the question he spoke of it as a trial balloon; now it is a fishing expedition, and at another time flying a kite. That covers quite a range.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am saying that it is the press correspondents who are flying the kites and balloons and fishing.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Oh, quite.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
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Item agreed to. 39. Expenses in connection with the negotiation of treaties, $5,000.


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

I suppose this sum is to cover travelling expenses and so forth in connection with the various negotiations.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Incidental

expenses in connection with negotiations.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
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Item agreed to. l/l. Grant to the International Red Cross Committee, $25,000.


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Will the Prime Minister explain what he means by the International

red cross committee? Is that a special organization outside the Red Cross Society?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

That is the

committee at Geneva, the work of which on Canada's behalf has been very much increased. In the supplementary estimates we intend to ask for a sum of $15,000 in addition to what is requested here. The committee has been giving a great deal of time and attention to matters relating to the needs of our prisoners of war in internment camps in Europe and Asia.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

A good deal of work has been done and excellent service rendered by some body-perhaps this committee, though I am not sure-in the forwarding and transferring of parcels to prisoners of war in various parts of enemy-occupied countries. I rather fancy this committee handles that work, but I am only supposing so.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The International Red Cross is supported by contributions from governments and national Red Cross societies. As the central committee at Geneva has received generous grants from the Swiss government and the Swiss public, little if any of the funds contributed by the belligerent countries is required to support the central organization, and therefore the greater part is spent by the committee in their work on behalf of prisoners of war and interned civilians. Delegates who visit prisoner and internment camps regularly are maintained by the committee in all belligerent countries. These delegates make reports on camp conditions which are duly transmitted by the international committee to the interested governments. They also do a great deal to provide comforts and means of recreation for prisoners of war. The amount of work which the international committee is doing on behalf of Canadian prisoners of war and internees in enemy hands is steadily increasing as the number of Canadian prisoners of war in enemy hands increases. With the outbreak of war in the far east a further responsibility has been placed on the International Red Cross. Three new delegates have been named in

Supply-External Affairs

Japan, Shanghai and Hong Kong, and reports have been and are now being received from them.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Are the relationships with Japan, so far as the International Red Cross is concerned, working out favourably now, and has there been a change for the better in connection with the operations of the prisoners of war situation in that country?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

They are somewhat better, but still far from satisfactory.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

I would ask the Prime Minister to table a copy of the American Red Cross report for 1939 with respect to China. I ask that question for the information of the house. Secondly, has the Prime Minister further information with regard to the continued shackling of Canadian prisoners through the International Red Cross?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I shall have to look into the report first and refresh my memory on its contents before deciding whether it should be tabled.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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July 13, 1943