July 7, 1943

PRIVILEGE-MR. LACOMBE REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF PRIME MINISTER ON JUNE 28

IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent Liberal

Mr. LIGUORI LACOMBE (Laval-Two Mountains):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege. On June 28, 1943, the Prime Minister made the following statement in the house as reported at page 4072 of English Hansard:

The statement to which I refer is as follows:

"We have here in the cabinet three new millionaires who have made their money since the war's outbreak. We shall denounce them at the proper time and place. Fortunes are being built up."

The proper time and place to make a statement of that kind is in this House of Commons with the hon. member simultaneously undertaking to prove the charge or, if he is unable to do so, to resign his seat in this house. I submit, Mr. Speaker, that the hon. member should be obliged either to withdraw the statement completely or else to convert it into a specific charge to be investigated in the usual manner, and the consequences of the investigation also to be followed up in the usual manner.

On my question of privilege I do say that those words which he then used about me bear a charge based upon an incorrect translar tion of the French debates of June 25 last. Because the Prime Minister did not verify the translation of the speech I gave in French I was subjected to serious wrong in respect of my privileges and prerogatives as a member of parliament. I was unfairly attacked by a certain portion of the press, and the incorrect translation of my speech, as quoted by the Prime Minister, was broadcast to all the country. This is the reason why, for the sake of truth, justice and honour, I ask the Prime Minister to withdraw the words which, on June 28 last, he unfairly said about me, on the basis of a highly incorrect translation.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LACOMBE REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF PRIME MINISTER ON JUNE 28
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I thought that matter had been cleared up some days ago.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LACOMBE REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF PRIME MINISTER ON JUNE 28
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IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent Liberal

Mr. LACOMBE:

It has never been.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LACOMBE REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF PRIME MINISTER ON JUNE 28
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I made it perfectly clear to the house and to the country that I did not regard as correct the translation which my hon. friend claims is not correct. I said so, and I gave the original French words my hon. friend used. I certainly thought the whole matter had been cleared up, and His Honour the Speaker indicated to the house that he was of the same opinion.

Empire Parliamentary Association

Mr. LACOM.BE: It was not the same day; it was on Wednesday last.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LACOMBE REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF PRIME MINISTER ON JUNE 28
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The same correction applies of course to both days, if that is any satisfaction to my hon.. friend.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LACOMBE REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF PRIME MINISTER ON JUNE 28
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IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent Liberal

Mr. LACOMBE:

I want a decision from the Chair. A few minutes' ago I did not ask the Prime Minister to withdraw the translation, but to withdraw the words which he said about me concerning this false translation.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LACOMBE REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF PRIME MINISTER ON JUNE 28
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. member brought this matter before the house on Wednesday last, as he has said, and I then indicated to him that the motion before the Chair dealt only with the French text, and not at all with the English translation. I would also point out to the hon. member that a question of privilege should be raised immediately or as soon thereafter as it is possible, by the hon. member who is claiming the privilege. This matter has now been before the house on two occasions, and the hon. member under the rules has no right to exercise a claim for privilege in respect of a matter which was already before the house a week ago.

In respect of the question the hon. member now raises, may I point out that the matter brought before the house was on the French text, not on the translation, I think therefore the incident must be considered as closed.

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IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent Liberal

Mr. LACOMBE:

I regret to have to appeal from your decision.

(And less than five members having risen):

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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Presenting reports hv

standing and select committees.

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PRIVATE BILLS

FOURTH AND FIFTH REPORTS-CONCURRENCE IN FOURTH REPORT


Mr. T. A. FONTAINE (St. Hyacinthe-Bagot) presented the fourth and fifth reports of the standing committee on miscellaneous private bills, and moved: That the fourth report of standing committee on miscellaneous private bills, presented this day, asking for leave to sit while the house is sitting, be concurred in. Motion agreed to.


EMPIRE PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION

VISIT OF CANADIAN MEMBERS TO WASHINGTON

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I have in my hand a copy of the Congressional Record, the proceedings and debates of the 78th congress, first session, Washington, Saturday, July 3,

1943. This number contains an account of the visit made by members of congress to the meeting of the Empire Parliamentary Association at Ottawa. I understand that the hon. member for Lake Centre (Mr. Diefen-baker), who was chairman of the conference, has also received a copy of the Congressional Record and would like to make reference to the visit of Canadian members to Washington arising out of what appears in the Congressional Record. If such is the case, I feel that my hon. friend might be permitted to make his remarks at this time.

Topic:   EMPIRE PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION
Subtopic:   VISIT OF CANADIAN MEMBERS TO WASHINGTON
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. DIEFENBAKER (Lake Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I thank the Prime Minister and the house for the opportunity of referring to the visit made by members of this house, together with the Speaker of the Senate, the Honourable Thomas Vien, to the Senate and the House of Representatives in Washington on June 30 and July 1.

The members of this house who were privileged to attend on that historic occasion were the hon. member for Stormont, the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Munitions and Supply (Mr. Chevrier), the hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar (Mr. Coldwell) and myself. I think reference should be made to the kindness and the friendship and hospitality which were shown to us by both houses, not as individuals but as representatives of the parliaments of Canada and the other parts of the British empire. I need hardly say that the depth and warmth of their reception of us epitomized the devotion and the common sacrifices of the British empire and the United States of America in the present struggle, and it was the expressed hope and prayer of the members of congress, the members of the Canadian parliament, and of the parliaments of the United Kingdom, of Australia, of New Zealand and of Bermuda, that out of this meeting would come a repetition in the years to come of like meetings, and that the spirit of cooperation that now actuates the great democracies in the world should be continued in the days of peace.

I should mention the outstanding event of the visit which showed the appreciation of the United States of America of the empire as a whole, and of Canada, which was that for the first time in history, members of parliament from all parts of the empire were invited to take and did take desk seats on the floor of the United States Senate while it was in session. This was the greatest tribute that the United States Senate could pay to the representatives of the empire, and history was indeed made thereby on July 1, 1943. I hold in my hand a copy of the Congressional Record

Questions

of July 3, 1943, in which United States Senator Warren Austin, one of our distinguished visitors, referred to the visit of the representatives - of the United) States to Canada. Referring to the fact that delegations from all parts of the empire and the United States had attended, he said:

The subject of study and informal discussion [DOT]was the qualification and capacity of democracies to win the war and to attain peace that will prevail throughout the world.

The discussions were marked by eagerness for information, candour of expression and friendly understanding.

No obligations were sought or undertaken, but consequences of high value in mutual understanding were realized.

He goes on to say that with the unanimous consent of the Senate he would like to place upon the record the eloquent speeches made on the occasion of that visit by the Prime Minister of Canada, the Leader of the Opposition, the hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar, and the hon. member for Lethbridge. He used these words:

I concur in the opinion of the Prime Minister of Canada that "the resolution itself will in time become an historic document," and I believe that this first meeting of members of the Congress of the United States with members of the Empire Parliamentary Association is the beginning of a relationship among those bodies- which are closest to the people of the democracies-having endless possibilities of understanding and achievement.

He ends with these words:

The compliment of their visit to the Congress of the United States is further evidence of the intention of the democracies to cultivate a more perfect union for the prosecution of the war and the attainment of lasting peace.

The words of Senator Austin are reechoed by every hon. member of this house.

Topic:   EMPIRE PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION
Subtopic:   VISIT OF CANADIAN MEMBERS TO WASHINGTON
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PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 116, for the relief of Elaine Alice McCormick Desrosiers.-Mr. Hill. Bill No. 118, for the relief of Phyllis Beatrice Barnett Woodham.-Mr. Hill.


July 7, 1943