July 1, 1943

PRIVILEGE-MR. KNOWLES REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF SPEECH OF MR. CRERAR AT STONEWALL, MAN.

CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. S. H. KNOWLES (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege. The privilege to which I refer has to do with a newspaper report concerning a speech of mine made in this house, in which report there was an entirely incorrect statement, as I shall prove by reference to Hansard.

The report to which I refer appears in the Winnipeg Free Press of June 29, 1943. The article is entitled, "Aluminum contract defended by Crerar." The portion which I wish to read is directly within quotation marks and is attributed to the Minister of Mines and Resources (Mr. Crerar). The speech was made, according to this report, at Stonewall, Manitoba, last Monday.

"Suppose the government had taken over the Aluminum Company of Canada, as the C.C.F. wanted us to do, what might have been the result? The international cartel might have denied us the use of bauxite and cryolite, two necessary ingredients, and we would not have been able to produce any aluminum.

"I asked Mr. Stanley Knowles in the House of Commons what he would have done under such circumstances. He gave me no answer."

It is in connection with that last sentence that I rise to a question of privilege-the statement that I gave the minister no answer, which, in the light of the record, to me is misrepresentation. I hold in my hand a copy of Hansard of June 14. On page 3634 I find the following:

Mr. Crerar: Assuming that the government had stepped in and expropriated or taken over the whole enterprise of the Aluminum Company of Canada on the Saguenay river, what would it have done for raw material? All the raw material that is converted into aluminum in the plant on the Saguenay comes from another country, and we do not and could not control that by any expropriation proceedings.

Canada and the War

Mr. Knowles: The answer I make to that is, first, that the raw material comes from Newfoundland and from British and Dutch Guiana, all of which countries are part of or under the united nations.

Then there were certain interruptions, points of order and so on. A little later in the column the Minister of Mines and Resources repeated his question:

Mr. Crerar: The hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre offers strong criticism of the government because it did not do a certain thing. I think I am quite within my rights in asking him how he proposes we should have done it. I ask him how he would have done it.

Mr. Knowles: I take it that the minister

has admitted that the aluminum interests had the government on the spot, so that the company could say to the government: This is the world price and you must pay it. And the government agreed to it.

My point, Mr. Speaker, is that the statement that I did not answer the minister's question is entirely incorrect, as Hansard bears out. He asked the question twice, and I gave an immediate answer on both occasions.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. KNOWLES REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF SPEECH OF MR. CRERAR AT STONEWALL, MAN.
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

No answer at all; absolutely none.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. KNOWLES REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF SPEECH OF MR. CRERAR AT STONEWALL, MAN.
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LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. T. A. CRERAR (Minister of Mines and Resources):

I do not know if I am in

order, but since my hon. friend has raised the question I may be permitted to make a comment on his remarks. I submit still that any reading of Hansard indicates clearly, and what my hon. friend has read indicates clearly, that he did not answer the question I asked him. I will put it to him now, and perhaps when he goes out to-

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. KNOWLES REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF SPEECH OF MR. CRERAR AT STONEWALL, MAN.
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Selkirk.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. KNOWLES REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF SPEECH OF MR. CRERAR AT STONEWALL, MAN.
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LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. CRERAR:

Well, to Selkirk or Montreal or anywhere else, he will answer it then. I asked him what the government would do if it had taken over the plant and raw materials were denied to it, and my hon. friend did not answer the question. He has not answered it yet, and I venture to say he will not answer it when he goes on the hustings in Selkirk to make speeches.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. KNOWLES REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF SPEECH OF MR. CRERAR AT STONEWALL, MAN.
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. KNOWLES:

Mr. Speaker, if I had

taken time to quote further from Hansard I could have shown that I said that the entire properties of Aluminium Limited should be taken over under the National Resources Mobilization Act, and further the minister knows that the properties outside Canada from which the raw materials are taken are owned by Aluminium Limited one hundred per cent, so that we could have taken them over at the same time.

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CANADA AND THE WAR

REVIEW OF EVENTS OF RECENT TEARS-76TH ANNIVERSARY OF CONFEDERATION

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

To-day Canada celebrates the seventy-sixth anniversary of confederation. To-day is also the fourth

Dominion day to be celebrated since the outbreak of war. To place our war-time situation in perspective, I should like for a moment to recall the conditions of war in previous years.

On July 1, 1940, the whole free world had been shaken to its foundations by the collapse of France. That was the darkest period in the war. The British nations alone stood- and they stood almost unarmed-against the seemingly invincible nazi war machine. Italy had joined the aggressor, and her armies were poised on the borders of Egypt. Most of the world waited anxiously for some inevitable climax.

The year which followed was the year of survival for the cause of freedom. The seemingly inevitable did not happen. Britain stood, battered but unbroken, against the nazi onslaught.

On July 1, 1941, the character and scope of the war had just been vastly changed by the furious and treacherous nazi assault on Soviet Russia. The minds of free men, deceived for years by lying propaganda, were suddenly called upon to face a wholly unexpected situation. None of the free nations faltered. In that hour, all extended the hand of friendship to the Soviet Union.

In the following year, as the titanic struggle on the steppes of Russia ebbed and flowed, the war in the east was joined with the war in the west. The dastardly attack upon Pearl Harbor made of the war a global struggle.

On July 1, 1942, the war had reached another dark hour. The soviet armies were being driven back; Japanese power had been extended far and wide in southeast Asia, and the islands of the Pacific. The gates of India were threatened by Japan; the Germans and Italians had reached the outskirts of Alexandria. Suez was in deadly peril. On the Atlantic and on the Pacific, enemy sea-power was increasing. The shores of North America were threatened.

The past year, however, witnessed the turn of the tide. In Russia, the Germans were driven back. In the Pacific, Japanese advances were checked. The axis forces were driven completely out of Africa; and on the Atlantic the U-boat menace has, for the time being at least, been greatly reduced.

Canada and the War

On this Dominion day, July 1, 1943, the world scene is vastly changed from a year ago. The united nations have everywhere gained the initiative. In the Atlantic, in the Mediterranean, in Europe, in the far east, and in the Pacific-in fact, in every theatre of war, there are substantial reasons for encouragement. The united nations are prepared for even fiercer fighting. They have steeled themselves to endure heavy losses, and to meet reverses and setbacks. All are determined to do their utmost to win. All now believe that their combined efforts will result in ultimate victory.

Each Dominion day in war time has marked steady progress in Canada's contribution to the cause of freedom. In 1940 we had only one division of our army overseas, a mere handful of airmen in action, a few ships on the Atlantic. Air training was only beginning; war production barely beyond the stage of planning and organization.

In 1941, our army overseas had served for a year as a bulwark of Britain's defences in the period of her gravest peril; our trained airmen were already a considerable factor in combat; our navy, greatly expanded, was taking a growing share in guarding the vital north Atlantic sea lanes; our war production and our foodstuffs had proved essential to Britain's continued resistance.

In 1942, our forces on land, at sea, and in the air had still further expanded. Canada's fighting men had continued to keep the world's citadel of freedom secure from invasion. Our fighting men had seen action on every sea and in the air, over almost every battlefront in a world-encircling conflict. Our war production was approaching its peak; our production of foodstuffs reached heights which seemed incredible. Our country was approaching a total effort.

To-day, July 1, 1943, as the united nations everywhere turn to the offensive, Canada is ready to take her full part in the forthcoming combined assault upon the enemy. We have mobilized our production, our forces, and our resources for the great offensive.

The war effort of Canada-on the production lines of the home front, in the skies over many an embattled land, on all the seas around the world, and in preparation for the supreme offensive against the European stronghold of the nazi enemy-is an evidence of our strength and of our purpose. It is an affirmation of our faith in the cause for which all the united nations fight. It is a gauge of Canada's emerging importance among the great nations of the world.

In the course of the last great war, we saw general recognition given to Canada's status

as a nation; a status later accorded full recognition at the imperial conference of 1926, and still later confirmed by the parliament of the United Kingdom in the statute of Westminster. In the course of the present war, we have seen Canada emerge from nationhood into a position generally recognized as that of a world power.

In the greetings which have come to the governent from many parts of the British commonwealth, and from foreign countries, this note has been predominant. The consensus is summed up, I believe, in the following paragraphs, which, according to a Canadian Press cable, appeared to-day in a leading London newspaper:

Britain and the empire join in a salutation on the dominion's 76th birthday.

They hail her not only as a member of our group of peoples, but as a world power in her own right.

Such is the energy of her people that industrially, and by measure of armed power, Canada ranks fourth in all the company of the united nations.

As our contributions to the war effort of the united nations have increased, so also has the stature of our nationhood. We are all proud of the extent to which mutual aid from Canada is helping other allied nations in arms, in the fight against axis aggression. In the years that lie ahead, our country will have responsibilities never hitherto imagined. There will be taste of helping to feed the liberated peoples whose homes and homelands have been destroyed and despoiled; of joining in the economic rebuilding of shattered national economies, and coordinating them within a world-wide system of interchange of goods and services; of sharing in the ordering of the world community for the future, so that there may be peace and justice, freedom and security for all. These are great tasks for any nation. We are already preparing to take our full share of these tasks.

The realization that we may still be at war when we reach July 1st of next year must certainly colour our thoughts and remembrances on this national anniversary.

The new year of our existence as a dominion, which begins to-day, will witness the supreme effort of Canada. Our people may, in the course of its days, be called upon- to pass through an ordeal greater than our country has ever experienced. In that ordeal we know that our fighting men will nobly uphold the honour of our country; that they will display the utmost resourcefulness, fortitude and heroism. The coming months will demand from all of us steadiness, determination and the utmost unity.

Canada and the War

After nearly four years of war our country, fortunately, is more united than it has been at any time since the outbreak of war. Canadian workingmen and women, Canadian farmers, Canadian business men, Canadians in all walks of life, have shown their readiness to put the interests of their country and of the world's freedom before their own immediate interests. In a world in which racial strife and racial domination are the instrument and the aim of the enemy, we in Canada have achieved a measure of racial harmony which is surpassed in no other country. It may truly be said that we have built a nation founded on the principles of equality and brotherhood among men. If a new era in which men and women can enjoy peace and prosperity is to be achieved, the application of these principles must be extended to the relations of all nations with one another. By our strength in war, and by our understanding and cooperation in peace, Canada can contribute mightily to the building of a better world.

To-day it is the prayer of the people of Canada that the Divine Power which has guided and guarded our country throughout the years of its growth may sustain our armed forces in their endurance of bitter conflicts, may give courage to our homes during the period of supreme trial that already is so nearly upon us, and may endow all the forces of freedom with the power and wisdom necessary to secure for mankind a just and enduring peace.

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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, on this memorable and historic occasion, as we pass another milestone along the pathway that has led us from confederation to this day it is with no small feeling of pride and of responsibility that I rise to add a word to what the Prime Minister has just said.

It is a sobering thought, and I could not help but think how sobering it was as I listened to the Prime Minister this afternoon, that perhaps in this seventy-seventh year of our Canadian federation, upon which we are now entering, we, the Canadian people, may be called upon to endure an ordeal such as this country has never before experienced. Since the year 1913 on eight different occasions, including to-day, we have celebrated Dominion day in the midst of a global war. We have been engaged in two global wars since we celebrated Dominion day in 1915. We can all at least hope and pray that whatever may lie ahead, whether or not it may bring the peace for which we are all looking, in the holocaust through which we must go before the rays of the sunshine of peace fall upon us, the Canadian people will carry the burden in the historic and traditional way of Canadians in years gone by.

Canada so far in this war has enjoyed relative security compared with many of our allies among the united nations and the British commonwealth itself. We have been spared some of the sorrows and sufferings which our allies have had to undergo. But as we celebrate the anniversary of confederation-and may I say, sir, that we celebrate it not simply as English-speaking and Frenchspeaking Canadians, but as Canadians all, whatever our extraction-I am proud as a Canadian to join with the Prime Minister in marking this important occasion.

I should like to close with this reference. In the midst of our thoughts are the members of our armed forces, our soldiers, our sailors and our airmen. They have written in the past and are writing now and will write in the days to come glorious pages in the history not only of Canada but of the British commonwealth of nations-yes, and of the world too. As we send them our greetings, whether they be overseas or in Canada, we wish them godspeed and good luck. To their loved ones left behind, and to those who have already lost some of their dear ones in this war, we extend as a parliament our condolences.

I think parliament too must pledge to the men of our armed forces, to whatever branch they may belong, unanimous support to the full limit of this country's resources in manpower, materials and finance in the perilous task in which they are engaged for the sake of all of us. We owe them a debt of gratitude which it will be very difficult for us in the years to come to pay. But we must resolve as a people to pay that debt, no matter how much it may be.

We are proud indeed as Canadians, as we look upon the past and assess the present and face the future, to feel, as the Prime Minister has said, a new power within ourselves from the position -we occupy in the great British commonwealth of nations and in the world at large.

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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

I have always rejoiced in the coming of Dominion day; for I have always been proud of our country, Canada, and have always been glad to contemplate the great future which can be in store for Canada if we manage our country wisely. It is a cause for satisfaction to all Canadians that Canada has attained national status; that she has become a world power; that she is now recognized as the fourth among the world powers. It is cause for deep satisfaction that we have almost boundless responsibilities in the world which is to come-responsibilities for the feeding of the peoples of the world, and for the rehabilitation of the world. But while we are rejoicing in what has been achieved; while our hearts are swelling with gratitude for what

Canada and the War

has been done in our behalf, I trust that oh this fateful day we shall not allow ourselves to be lulled into complacency with respect to the things that are ahead. Not only must we win this war; we must win the peace, and the foundation of that peace must be laid right here in this parliament, this year.

I am sorry to have to say, and I trust it will not mar the spirit of this occasion, that up to the present time there has not been one single, solitary fundamental principle laid down by which the reorganization of a sound and safe world may be undertaken. The allimportant problem for the Dominion of Canada, as for the world as a whole, is to learn how to distribute goods both within this country and among the nations. Until the Prime Minister can stand in his place and tell us that this problem has been solved, that the principle upon which the solution depends has been discovered and that he will adopt that principle, most of his beautiful speeches will remain just beautiful speeches.

The men are doing their share. On many occasions I have expressed reverence for the youth of this land; they have conducted themselves magnificently. I am not going into details to show how little right we had to expect the glorious achievements that our boys have brought about, but in spite of the handicaps under which they were placed they have achieved greatly, and an everlasting tribute of gratitude is diue from all the people to the youth who have risen to such heights. My only concern, Mr. Speaker, is as to whether or not the men at home are to be worthy of the youth who have gone to fight our battles, or whether they are to betray those youths when they return, as they have already betrayed them into war.

Canada can contribute a glorious share to the future of the world. The important question is whether she will do so, or whether, when this war is over, she will plunge into fierce commercial rivalry. Is Canada preparing to-day to engage in genuine cooperation, or is she preparing for commercial rivalry? That question should be answered; and if the answer is that she is looking forward to

commercial rivalry, then on this Dominion day we are far from having attained the degree of perfection which we should have attained.

There is great hope for the future. When the war broke out I said we must notexpect to be destroyed. There is a splendid future in store for us if we are but wise enough to know how to enter into thepromised land. If we cooperate with the

members of the British commonwealth of nations as we could and should, we can build

a greater and stronger commonwealth and empire than has ever been dreamed of during its long history. If we do not cooperate, we shall be on the way downward with respect to the empire. If Canada and the members of the commonwealth and the United States can learn to cooperate as they should, then we can assure the world freedom from war in our own right, as an Anglo-Saxon race associated with the friends who are within our gates. The question for us to ask ourselves is whether we are to discover the principle upon which true cooperation is based.

May I, sir, join with those who have already expressed solemn gratitude to the boys and girls who have gone forth to fight this war, to defend the principles of freedom, to defend us and all that we hold dear. May I join also in the note of reverence with which the Prime Minister concluded his remarks. I feel that we should be filled with the deepest thanksgiving to-day to the God of our fathers who has thus far guided our destinies through this dreadful conflict and given us the hope which we are now able to enjoy. In these two respects I wish to join with those who have already spoken, in expressing profound gratitude and thanksgiving on this Dominion day.

Hon. LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT (Minister of Justice) (Translation): Mr. Speaker, may I also, as a Canadian who is proud of a title which befits all of us, of whatever racial extraction, be permitted to add just one word?

This is the anniversary of the birth of the Canadian confederation and on this occasion I deem it appropriate-and I am sure all hon. members of this house have the same feeling- to emphasize that the term "Canadian" applies to the citizens of a nation whose parliament is bilingual.

I shall not attempt to summarize again in French the events which have marked the last four anniversaries of our confederation. If I refrain from doing so, it is for the simple reason that both languages are official, and because what is said in one language does not need to be repeated in the other language; it is said to all. I wish particularly to associate myself with the noble statement made by the right hon. the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) to the effect that our young nation intends to fulfil ever proudly her part as a member of the united nations, everywhere recognized as a full grown, important and sui juris member of the family of those great nations which are to-day united in defence of liberty and Christian civilization, which constitute the most treasured heritage of each of them.

Canada and the War

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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. ANGUS MacINNIS (Vancouver East):

In the absence of the leader of this party it is appropriate that I should say a word for our group on this anniversary of confederation. We should be thankful indeed for the improvement in the war position to-day as compared with 1940. I doubt if any member of this house can ever forget the dark days of the summer of 1940. I am sure I can never forget them, because they were the most terrible days I ever experienced.

In considering the improved position to-day I think we should try always to keep in mind how we arrived at this position. We have reached our present position through the cooperation of all the people of the united nations. It was not the work of governments; it was not the work of industrialists; it was not the work of this class or that class. It was the welding together into one whole of the combined efforts of our people for a common purpose. In that, and in that alone, lies the hope of the future. If after this war is over, if after peace comes we are not able to continue this cooperation, then I am afraid all we shall have won through suffering and bloodshed will be lost.

The Prime Minister spoke about the great achievements of this dominion, and mentioned that we have now reached the status of a great power. I believe that we have; and having reached the status of a great power we have immensely increased our responsibilities. We must no longer in the councils of the nations allow other people to make our foreign policy for us. We must exercise the power which we have now obtained.

In the reading of history I have not derived comfort from the achievements of the great powers. I do not think any great power to this day has used its power for the good of humanity. Power has been used for the creation of empires. Empires have not always been used for the welfare of humanity. If we are to be great, if we are to achieve greatness in the future, if we are to have peace and harmony, then we shall have to stop thinking of empire and begin thinking in terms of a world community-not Anglo-Saxon, not of only English-speaking races, but of the whole world.

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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

The hon. member will not forget the empire, will he?

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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to say a few words in support of the splendid addresses of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), the leader of the opposition (Mr. Gnaydon), the leader of the Social Credit party (Mr. Black-more) and the hon. member who spoke on behalf of the Cooperative Commonwealth

Federation (Mr. Maclnnis). They have rewritten to-day the axiom laid down by Sir John A. Macdonald a.t Kingston in 1844, with respect to the destiny of this country. I was pleased, too, to hear the Minister of Justice (Mr. St. Laurent) speak on behalf of French Canada.

Four years ago we were honoured by the visit of the king and the queen. The tremendous popularity of the monarchy was clearly demonstrated in all the provinces; in Quebec the school children turned out in . such large numbers to welcome them. We are fighting this war for the right to live, but we must not forget the peace terms. The little man who saved England and who fought at Dunkirk will have something to say about those peace terms. And unless we as a dominion remain .part of the British empire we shall have very little to say at the peace table. Let us not forget that we are allied with two powerful and imperialistic nations, the United States, and our great ally Russia. They may not be imperialistic in the sense that they want to grab more territory; that remains to be seen. There are many leading men, however, in those countries who do want extra territory. I say, however, that they are imperialistic only in the sense that they want to have a large share in world affairs and in the stipulation of the terms of peace.

Great Britain cannot exist after the war without the dominions. She needs them, as they need her. She has been the good Samaritan during this war to all the nations. Unless we remain closely allied with her she will become only a second class power after the war, and we shall have little or nothing to say about the terms of peace.

In this war we are fighting as an empire on the side of humanity, liberty, freedom and civilization. We will remember that the British Prime Minister said that he had not become prime minister to preside at the liquidation of the empire, or to let the empire go by default, H that were to happen, the mother country would become a second class power, at the edge of Europe.

I rejoice that this message of hope is to be sent to our troops at the front, and it pleases me that those of us who are working in the House of Commons have taken this opportunity to pay tribute to the glorious record of the mother country down through the ages, and to the part the dominions have played.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Mr. Speaker, I suggest this would be the appropriate time and occasion for hon. members to join in the singing of O Canada.

Whereupon the members of the house rose and sang 0 Canada.

Questions

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PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS


Bill No. Ill, for the relief of Gertrude Mantha Hore.-Mr. Fulford. Bill No. 112, for the relief of Claire Mac-Laren Hunter Barlow.-Mr. Ross (St. Paul's). Bill No. 113, for the relief of Mary Constance Helena Keys Bates.-Mr. Glaxton.


QUESTIONS

July 1, 1943