May 21, 1943

RESTRICTION OF DELIVERIES TO THREE TIMES A WEEK


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Joseph-Hermas Leclerc

Liberal

Mr. J. H. LECLERC (Shefford):

I have recently had several complaints from housewives because of what I understand is an order in council or a ruling that ice cannot be delivered oftener than three times a week. As we are to be limited in our supplies of butter and meat and everything else, I would urge upon the government that they authorize deliveries of ice at least four times a week for the next two months.

Topic:   RESTRICTION OF DELIVERIES TO THREE TIMES A WEEK
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

I will take up the matter with the wartime prices and trade board.

Topic:   RESTRICTION OF DELIVERIES TO THREE TIMES A WEEK
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FUEL WOOD

EXTENSION OF PERIOD OF SUBSIDY BEYOND JUNE 30


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Gordon Knapman Fraser

National Government

Mr. G. K. FRASER (Peterborough West):

I should like to ask the Minister of Munitions and Supply whether, in view of the fact that the weather has been unfavourable to the farmers this year, he has given consideration to extending the subsidy date in respect of fuel wood from June 30 until October.

Topic:   FUEL WOOD
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF PERIOD OF SUBSIDY BEYOND JUNE 30
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Consideration has been given to that proposal, and the time will be extended, but I am not sure to what date. An announcement will be made very shortly.

Topic:   FUEL WOOD
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF PERIOD OF SUBSIDY BEYOND JUNE 30
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MAN-POWER QUESTION AS TO DATE OF TRANSFER OF ADDITIONAL HELP TO FARMS


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. DIEFENBAKER (Lake Centre):

Again I wish to direct a question to the Minister of Labour in regard to the matter of shortage of man-power on farms, where enlistments have been heavy. When will the manpower be transferred compulsorily to farms? If it is not to be done right away, it will not be very helpful this spring. I think the country requires an explanation and should have the information now.

Topic:   MAN-POWER QUESTION AS TO DATE OF TRANSFER OF ADDITIONAL HELP TO FARMS
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

As soon as I have seen the Minister of Agriculture and certain other ministers I wall make a complete statement on man-power. I think it is best that I should defer it until then.

Topic:   MAN-POWER QUESTION AS TO DATE OF TRANSFER OF ADDITIONAL HELP TO FARMS
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

The farmers want help now.

War Appropriation-Air Services

Topic:   MAN-POWER QUESTION AS TO DATE OF TRANSFER OF ADDITIONAL HELP TO FARMS
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WAR APPROPRIATION BILL

PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY


The house resumed from Tuesday, May 18, consideration in committee of a resolution to grant to his majesty certain sums of money for the carrying out of measures consequent upon the existence of a state of war-Mr. Ilsley-Mr. Bradette in the chair.


NATIONAL DEFENCE FOR AIR

LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Associate Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. C. G. POWER (Minister of National Defence for Air):

Mr. Chairman, the year

which has elapsed since last I addressed the house in support of a war appropriation for the Royal Canadian Air Force has been one of great importance to that force-one of progress, one of struggle, one of battle, and one of some measure of achievement. Achievement, in the joint air training plan, by way of progress and increased training, by way of consultations with members of the united nations at the air training conference held in May and June of last year in Ottawa, at which we learned a great deal, and, I hope, our allies learned a great deal; progress in conferences with our associates and partners in the commonwealth air training scheme and in the completion of a supplementary agreement to the agreement signed in December, 1939, in the joint air training scheme; a further agreement, signed a month or so ago in London, again with reference to the joint air training scheme. It has seen a vast expansion of construction of aerodromes in the air training scheme, and it has seen a stabilization of air training in Canada to the extent that those concerned with the plan are no longer diverted from their immediate duty of training aircrews to the degree which they were by the demands made upon them for expansion, the building of aerodromes and other matters ancillary to the main objective of turning out aircrew.

It has been a time of expansion in the home war establishment. Our home squadrons have been in contact with the enemy on both coasts, our fighter squadrons in Alaska and our anti-submarine chasers on the Atlantic. We have received a large number of aircraft from Canadian and American sources. We have completed to a large extent the building of our defensive aerodromes on both coasts and have made provision for trained aircrew to man the aircraft which we now have on hand. But it was in our overseas operations that there was the greatest expansion, both in aircrew and in ground crew. New squadrons have been formed, a new bomber group, which collected together a number of Canadian squadrons, which were placed under the command of a

Canadian commanding officer, and which have taken part in very important operations in conjunction with the Royal Air Force, and more recently on their own. There has been much greater activity on the part not only of our squadrons, but of Royal Canadian Air Force men who are in the Royal Air Force squadrons. We have undertaken greater responsibility, financially and otherwise, for our people overseas in them and in the Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons.

Operational control, as the house well knows, remains in the hands of the Royal Air Force and will continue to do so for the duration of the war. I will deal with all these matters under appropriate headings.

I propose to give a somewhat disjointed and unpolished statement indicating what the Royal Canadian Air Force is doing. For two reasons, I do not propose this afternoon to enter into any controversial matter. The first is that, as the house knows, for the moment at all events, I am only pinch-hitting and the debate on the army appropriation will be resumed next Monday, so that it would be inappropriate for me at this time to take up matters which would call for a reply, particularly when there will hardly be time, on the conclusion of my statement, for members to question me, as they would, with respect to certain matters on which certain members hold strong views.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE FOR AIR
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Does that mean that my hon. friend will make a supplementary general statement later?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE FOR AIR
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May 21, 1943