May 13, 1943

CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

I have just received a telegram from Manitoba dealing with the matter I mentioned in the house a short time ago, a complaint that adequate supplies of milk are not coming through to points on the Hudson Bay railway served from the Pas. There is no adequate reserve supply; trains run only once a week, and some communities are without a proper supply of milk for children. Can the minister say whether the position has been improved?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   REPORTED SHORTAGE IN NORTHERN MANITOBA
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) :

Since the hon. member mentioned this question before I have had no complaints from the Pas. I understood they were satisfied with the amounts being sent.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   REPORTED SHORTAGE IN NORTHERN MANITOBA
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

Apparently these communities are on the Hudson Bay railway line served from the Pas; they cannot get adequate supplies in and there are no reserve supplies.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   REPORTED SHORTAGE IN NORTHERN MANITOBA
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

I will find out whether there is any further information.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   REPORTED SHORTAGE IN NORTHERN MANITOBA
Permalink

GASOLINE


On the orders of the day:


NAT

James Arthur Ross

National Government

Mr. J. A. ROSS (Souris):

I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Munitions and Supply. Would he have arrangements made by which gasoline stations throughout rural Canada would be authorized to stay open one evening a week, preferably Saturday evenings, until ten o'clock, for the convenience of farmers? It would mean a tremendous saving in man-power hours and be a great help to the war effort and agriculture. I raised this question a year ago, on May 14, and dealt with it fully.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   GASOLINE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST THAT SERVICE STATIONS REMAIN OPEN ONE EVENING A WEEK
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

I will call the request of my hon. friend to the attention of the oil controller, and I am sure that some action will be taken in that direction.

Coal Situation

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   GASOLINE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST THAT SERVICE STATIONS REMAIN OPEN ONE EVENING A WEEK
Permalink

COAL SITUATION-INCREASE IN PRICE OF COAL IN TORONTO


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

I have an emergency question that I want to ask the government. It relates to the coal situation. The two weeks' truce in the labour dispute in the coal mines in the United States will expire on Sunday night. What is the government doing to ensure an adequate coal supply for next fall and winter? The second question is this: An order has been passed by the controller raising the price of coal in Toronto seventy-five cents a ton for delivery. That order will expire next Tuesday. What means are going to be taken by the government to declare coal a preferred industry? Will the seventy-five cent order be continued for a time until a permanent coal policy is decided upon? What is to be done about next winter? If the seventy-five cent order is suspended on Tuesday some small dealers will not be able to carry on. I suggest that the government might well consider under the price ceiling policy an allowance of a dollar a ton for domestic retail delivery. This winter is not yet over; coal is still required, and in four months delivery for next fall and winter will start. It is a matter of great urgency.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   COAL SITUATION-INCREASE IN PRICE OF COAL IN TORONTO
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

The government is giving the closest possible attention to the coal situation. It is recognized that the situation is grave; every effort is being made to meet it. I have no immediate information on the situation in Toronto, but I shall be glad to get information and give it later.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   COAL SITUATION-INCREASE IN PRICE OF COAL IN TORONTO
Permalink
NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

We shall be frozen next winter.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   COAL SITUATION-INCREASE IN PRICE OF COAL IN TORONTO
Permalink

UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID


The house resumed from Wednesday, May 12, consideration in committee of bill No. 76, for granting to his majesty aid for the purpose of making available Canadian war supplies to the united nations-Mr. Usley-Mr. Bradette in the chair. On section 3-Canadian Mutual Aid board.


SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

At six o'clock last evening I had been commenting upon the committee which is to be appointed to carry on the activities envisaged by this bill, and I said I thought the committee, which is being

selected from the members of the cabinet, was being chosen wisely, since the members of the committee would be directly responsible to the cabinet and to the House of Commons. I had also expressed approval of the number of members of the committee. I was going on to point out that when the federal Department of Finance had in it men who were realistic in their outlook with respect to financial matters, then the standard of living in Canada could be raised through the activities of this committee to a level which would conform to the ability of the country to produce goods and services. I had pointed out that this committee will have very important functions to perform. First of all its work will have to do with the war; then it will have to do with the reconstruction period before the treaty of peace is signed, and later there will be definite and responsible work for this committee to do during the time of peace which will follow the signing of the treaty.

It may be argued that the life of this bill is only one year, but as I see it this is only the first of a long series of acts which will be based on the principle of lease-lend. When the time comes for the world to settle down to peaceful pursuits, we shall find it necessary to carry on mutual aid operations for the benefit of countries whose resources are not adequate to support the standard of life which ought to obtain there, considering the period of the world's history in which we shall be living. It wiH >be necessary, therefore, for us to have boards like this and acts like this to enable Canada to contribute her portion of the goods which must be contributed by the nations possessing rich resources, in order that the nations less abundantly equipped may be able to enjoy a fair standard of living.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

Order; I cannot hear what the hon. member is saying because of the noise in the committee.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
Permalink
SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman ; I must say it was becoming impossible to hear what I was saying myself. I believe there is altogether too little attention being paid by hon. members of this house to vital matters pertaining to the reconstruction of the world. Too many people have the idea that we know all about how to carry on in the days that are to come. As a matter of fact we are as hopelessly unprepared for the peace that is coming as we were unprepared in the year 1936 for the war that was coming. The result will be just as great a disaster in connection with the peace as we have seen as a result of the -war, unless hon. members of this house and the people of this country become alive

Mutual Aid Bill

to the fact that there is real difficulty in this world which must be made right. It is not going to be possible to carry on under the old order, as we have been doing for the past forty years.

Now that the committee is able to hear me, I think I have concluded what I have to say at this time, not wishing to go into too great detail on this section of the bill.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
Permalink
NAT

James Arthur Ross

National Government

Mr. ROSS (Souris):

I should like to say

just a word with reference to the amendment that has been proposed. I agree with some of the other hon. members who have spoken that the committee which is to be set up may have an important influence upon the trade policies of Canada following the war. I am. satisfied that the United States, in. regard to its lease-lend bill, certainly has an eye to its future trade policies. In my opinion many of our past difficulties with respect to agriculture have arisen from the fact that we have had one minister responsible for production and another minister responsible for marketing, an arrangement in which I have never been able to see any sound economy. In my view the Minister of Trade and Commerce, by virtue of his office, should be, next to the Minister of Munitions and Supply, the most important member of this committee. Yesterday I asked a question concerning an agricultural commodity delivered to Britain under the aid bill of last year. Four of the five proposed members of this committee were present, yet I was unable to obtain an answer to my question. Certainly I think the Minister of Agriculture should be a member of this committee, as it is proposed he shall be, but I believe it most important not only to agriculture but to the future well-being of the w'hole country that the Minister of Trade and Commerce should be a member also, because no matter what our occupation may be our future welfare depends upon the trade of the country. This bill is to deal with a war condition, but you cannot dissociate its operation from matters of trade which will have a distinct bearing on the future of this country. Therefore I hope the minister may see fit to accept this amendment and include the Minister of Trade and Commerce in this committee.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
Permalink
LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

The first thing to keep in

mind in discussing this amendment, and I know every hon. member does keep it in mind, is that we must not have any regard whatever to personalities. So far as my colleague, the Minister of Trade and Commerce is concerned, everyone has high regard for him.; his judgment is of the best, and

he would be an addition to any committee or deliberative body. But the question whether or not the Minister of Trade andi Commerce should be a member of the Mutual Aid board must be determined upon entirely different considerations. I should tell the committee that we set out to keep this committee or board just as small as possible. If we couldihave had a board of three or of two members it would have been desirable, other things being equal, because, generally speaking, the smaller the boards, the more expeditious are their proceedings. But it seemed to be impossible to . escape the appointment of five members of the cabinet, and there are- compelling, and strong reasons for the selection of all those selected. The Minister of Munitions and Supply would of course have to be on the board. He would be the proper minister to act as chairman. He is in charge of the procurement of munitions, and their production in this country, which are the foundation of the greater part of the operations of the board. But there is another important group of products in Canada, namely the products of the farm. The procurement agency for agricultural products is the Department of Agriculture, headed by the Minister of Agriculture. It was thought necessary that he be made a member of the board. - Between them, those two members cover nearly the whole field-not the whole of it, of course, but nearly the whole of it. Their departments cover the range of products which will be supplied, to our allies. It was necessary to have the defence departments represented. There were excellent reasons for appointing all three defence ministers to the board, because each has a vital interest in the allocation of munitions as between the requirements of our own services and those of the services of other countries. It was finally decided, however, in the interests of keeping the board small, that the Minister of National Defence should serve as the representative of the three defence departments, although the other two defence departments _ have a vital interest in the allocation of munitions and supplies.

I believe the reason for having the Minister of Finance on the board is a compelling one. Finance must be represented, not only for the reason mentioned by the hon. member for York-Sunbury, the extent and importance of the financial expenditures involved, but because a shortage of Canadian dollars is an important criterion for a country receiving assistance under the act. The Department of Finance is the only one which can supply information and advice on that point. It must say whether goods should be charged

Mutual Aid Bill

to the war appropriation, or to the Mutual Aid appropriation. That is distinctly a financial problem and indeed a difficult one. Therefore it was necessary to have the Minister of Finance on the board. The Minister of Justice was appointed to the board because arrangements will be made by exchanges of notes, agreements and the like, in respect of the supply of these goods, with various governments. In my opinion no one in the government or outside of it would be more competent to advise and guide on matters of the kind than would the Minister of Justice.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
Permalink

May 13, 1943