May 13, 1943

LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

I do not wish to appear to

disregard these suggestions. I do not think it requires any clarification. The hon. gentleman is reading "provided" as though it meant "if." It does not mean that, it means "with this provision "

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. KNOWLES:

He is also reading "shall" as though it were "does."

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

We get the report anyway.

Amendment (Mr. Mackenzie, Vancouver Centre) agreed to.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

If the government of the

day during the period between the two wars had given a little more thought to the safety

[Mr. Ilsley.l

of the state, we would never have had this war. This amendment to section eight of this bill should never have been submitted to a committee considering the bill. No dominion has had as little information during the war from its government of the day as has Canada. This applies also to the press and to radio broadcasts. I should like to set forth my reasons for opposing this amendment. We have been given less information about the conduct of the war than any other dominion. No one wishes to give away state secrets. I do not know of any citizen of the dominion, except a very few, who would ever think of giving away anything that would hurt our forces on the land, in the air or on the sea.

The giving of supplies under this lendJease arrangement will have to be continued to those countries which have been devastated by the axis powers. Why should the governor in council have the right to spend money without the high court of parliament having a word to say about the matter? If this committee passes such an amendment we shall be saying good-bye to any control over the expenditures of this country. We say we are fighting for the four freedoms, and we give power to the executive to conduct its affairs in secret. I am absolutely opposed to this amendment. The governor in council is given the power to make rules and regulations which will have the force of statutes, and parliament is to know nothing about them. A war was fought for nearly a hundred years to secure for the House of Commons control over expenditures, and every day we sit here we continue to lose control over the executive conduct of the war.

I asked for some information about his majesty's forces. I could not get it here, but I got it from the New York papers, which reported a statement by Mr. Lyttelton, minister of production in Great Britain. This was in connection with .the great armada which went to Algiers and Morocco. His statement gave the number of ships, which I believe was 500 transports and 350 warships. That information was given to the United States people, but we were refused all that information. We have an information bureau, but they will receive only such information as the governor in council wants to give them. Where will the press come in with regard to all this? Are they to be denied information about the conduct of the war?

The governor in council are not spending their own money, they are spending the money of the taxpayers. They have no right to keep this information from the public, from the

Mutual Aid Bill

taxpayers of this country. The people of Canada, and especially the working classes, have not been given sufficient information about the conduct of the war. Right up to the outbreak of the war we were told that there would be no war, that everything would be all right. The Minister of National Defence made a good presentation of his case when he asked for a moderate increase in his estimates, and it was not many days before he got it. Under this bill vital information is to be withheld from the public, and if this is continued we shall have another war very shortly. Children and babes in arms of to-day will be called up twenty years hence. I am opposed to the principle of this bill. I have opposed all these things right from the start of the war. I believe the public are entitled to know the facts. They are entitled to the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth about the conduct of the war and the way in which the executive is conducting the war.

Section as amended agreed to.

On the preamble.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

I should like to refer to a section of the preamble which reads:

. . . whereas it is expedient that the conditions upon which Canadian war supplies are made available to other united nations should not be such as to burden post-war commerce or leave to the imposition of trade restrictions or otherwise prejudice a just and enduring peace.

May I commend the minister for the clarity of vision and the depth of understanding revealed by the man who drafted this preamble. We have heard the Prime Minister from his place in this house utter some exceedingly superficial remarks with regard to the objectionable features of economic nationalism and the objectional aspects of having tariffs and trade restrictions and all that sort of thing, just as though the dear man did not understand why all these things are imposed by the various nations. I am glad that the person who drafted this bill apparently did understand this. He realized that the fundamental reason for economic restrictions, tariff barriers, exchange restrictions, quotas and all the rest is the simple fact that the nation imposing such restrictions does so because it finds itself falling behind in the contest for world trade. In other words, it has developed an unfavourable trade balance and, in order to protect itself, it imposes these restrictions.

The man who drafted this bill has foreseen that during the war it is possible that certain nations may fall into debt to other nations to such an extent that they will have to establish restrictions and resist the tendency

72537-189J

to trade, thereby creating all the troubles which were supposed to have caused this war. I merely wish to point out that not only during the immediate post-war period but during all time to come, as long as we persist in retaining the present economic system, any nation in the world will be in danger of having an adverse trade balance, provided it must import more than it exports. As I see it, one of the main advantages of this bill is that it, or a measure similar to it, can be applied, say ten or fifteen years from now and that it will be possible thereby for Mutual Aid or lease-lend arrangements to be in operation, so that nations like Canada, which can produce a surplus of wheat, for example, for which they have no use, will be able to give of that surplus to a nation which is in danger of having an adverse trade balance. In like manner, the United States and other nations with abundant resources, if they and their rulers possess sufficient vision and understanding, will be able to remove the dangers of adverse trade balances throughout the world and thereby establish what this bill calls a basis for "a just and enduring peace".

Very little has been said in this debate about such a possibility. I do not wish to be out of order by going too far on this matter, but I believe, Mr. Chairman, you will indulge me if I go just far enough to point this out. It has been advocated already two or three times in this house, and all over the country ad nauseam, that the way to solve the world's problems after the war is to establish a supranational government with a big police force with a huge stick to force the nations to do as they ought to do. Yet never a word has been said by the advocates of this supranational government about the fact that nations have adverse trade balances because their population is too large for the size of the country, or the meagreness of their resources renders it impossible for them to produce enough goods to give their people the proper standard of living; and no provision is made by the planners of these supranational governments for meeting that situation. Yet may I point out that its fundamental cause, as is indicated here, is this very failure of nations to compete with other nations in international trade. Countries like Canada, Australia, New Zealand. United States and Brazil, which have an abundance of resources in very wide variety enabling them to produce more goods than they can possibly use, making it possible for them to have favourable trade balances all the time, can introduce perpetual pacts

Mutual Aid Bill

of Mutual Aid, and provided the people in charge of their financial affairs see how they can be financed without debt or taxation, can perpetually distribute of their abundance to nations which are less favourably situated, thereby removing want and fear. This is the only means whereby Roosevelt's and Churchill's dream in the Atlantic charter can be realized and we can guarantee freedom from w'ant and freedom from fear. This same device of Mutual Aid, which we are using today to fight and win a war with, can be used in peace to win the peace; and it is the only kind of device which can be so used.

I submit that if the nations which are so abundantly blessed come to understand this thing, they will not need to have any supernational government poking its nose into their affairs in every direction and telling them how to run their own business, any more than Canada has to have any such organization telling her what to do during this war. If Canada finds that Great Britain needs wheat, Canada produces wheat and lets Britain have it, and that is that. If Canada finds that Great Britain needs pork, she produces pork and lets Britain have it. Britain does not have to come over here with a fleet of aeroplanes and an international police force to get Canada to do it; Canada does it, and is better off for doing it. Once we see this vision, we shall never again give even a moment's thought to the idea of yielding any degree of our national sovereignty to any international gang of uncertain nonentities. That is one of the results which will come from the application of the principle of this bill.

I think I have said enough for the present time. I shall probably say more on a later occasion. Once more, let me congratulate the minister and whoever it was drafted this bill upon his clearness of vision and his understanding. It has given me a great deal of comfort to find someone who understands and is honest enough to acknowledge and recognize in writing just what is the cause of war and what would be the cause of future wars, and to indicate how that cause can be removed without destroying the sovereignty of any of the united nations.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

Regarding this amendment about the governor general in council-

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

That is carried.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

-I draw attention to a statement which is directly contrary to what Britain did.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

Is the Chairman aware that the hon. gentleman is talking of an amendment which was carried?

fMr. Blaokmore.)

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

I can speak on the amendment in committee.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

It is carried.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

I am only going to be a minute. I could speak on the third reading, but I shall occupy not more than a moment. Are we to tell the country if we pass this amendment that the people and the press are to be allowed only so much information as the government wishes to give them, or are we to be told the real facts?

In this connection I wish to refer to one item of information given last Monday by the Prime Minister, as recorded in Hansard, at page 2501, and relating to Tunisia, which I find is directly contrary to what the British information board has given out in England. The board stated that General Montgomery's Eighth Army consisted to the extent of seventy-six per cent of men from the British isles, and that ninety per cent of the army of General Alexander which battled its way across the desert were men from the British isles, the remaining ten per cent being from the dominions, Africa, India and other places. That information is entirely different from what I find recorded on page 2501. I ask, are we to allow the country to know only as much as the government wants to let them know, or are we to tell them the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth about all phases of the war?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-GENERAL PURCHASING BRANCH CEILING PRICES
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Sub-subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF SI,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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Preamble agreed to. Title agreed to. Bill reported.


WAR APPROPRIATION BILL

PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY


The house resumed from Wednesday, March 3, consideration of the motion of Mr. Usley for the house to go into committee to consider the following resolution: That it expedient to introduce a measure to provide, inter alia, 1. That sums not exceeding $3,890,000,000 be granted to His Majesty towards defraying any expenses or making any advances or loans that * may be incurred or granted by or under the authority of the governor in council during the year ending March 31, 1944, for- (a) the security, defence, peace, order and welfare of Canada; (b) the conduct of naval, military and air operations in or beyond Canada; (c) promoting the continuance of trade, industry and business communications, whether by means of insurance or indemnity against war risk or in any other manner whatsoever; and War Appropriation-Army (d) the carrying out of any measures deemed necessary or advisable by the governor in council in consequence of the existence of a state of war. 2. That the governor in council he empowered to raise by way of loan under the provisions of the Consolidated Revenue and Audit Act, 1931, such sum or sums of money, not exceeding in the whole the sum of $3,890,000,000 as may be required for the purpose of defraying such expenses or making such advances or loans, the principal and interest of any such loan to be a charge upon and payable out of the consolidated revenue fund. 3. That the governor in council be empowered to reexpend, advance or loan moneys that may be received by way of refund or repayment of advances, loans or expenditure under the War Appropriation Acts of 1939 (second session), 1940, 1941, 1942 and 1943.


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Before the motion is adopted I have one or two observations to make. I should like to put our party on record on one or two points in connection with the war appropriation measure, and I wish to have it distinctly understood that in allowing the resolution to pass to the committee stage we do not desire to escape a debate on the general principles of the bill but rather wish to expedite the examination, which we intend to make in an exhaustive manner, into the various items that constitute the war appropriation bill itself. May I say to the government and to the Minister of Finance that when this resolution goes into committee of the whole we shall expect that minister after minister shall give full, explicit and complete disclosures of all matters covering their departments in each particular instance. We want no reservations on the part of ministers but a full disclosure of all matters relating to war appropriations.

May I recall the undertaking given by the Minister of Finance some weeks ago when we asked for a comparable statement with respect to expenditures under the various items of the war appropriation bill as they appeared in the other acts passed under war appropriation in previous years since the war began. I recall that undertaking so that when the bill is in committee we may have the benefit of the information which was asked for at that time.

This is a huge expenditure of money, the largest war appropriation bill ever brought down before the House of Commons. For that reason, of course, the people of Canada will expect, and they have a perfect right to have, a full inquiry and the closest sort of scrutiny into the war expenditures which are indicated. That is a part of the duty of His Majesty's loyal opposition, and in allowing this bill to go into committee as speedily as possible we do so for the purpose of avoiding at this time any lengthy general debate. The purpose is

to come to grips with the whole matter of governmental expenditures relating to the war as expeditiously and as effectively as possible. Without making any general remarks with regard to the appropriation bill, I wish to say at the moment that we hope to be able to make a particularly exhaustive inquiry into every item in the bill. The people to-day are more anxious than they have ever been about the expenditure of money. Many classes of our people are paying taxes who perhaps have never paid heavy taxes before, and in their interests as well as in the interests of the nation at large, it seems to me that the Canadian people will expect that, on the most important measure which has so far come before parliament, the government shall \give in minute detail, and shall be examined on just as minutely, every item which is being brought down.

I conclude with this remark. When the supplementary vote of the War Appropriation Act of last year was passed, a definite undertaking was given by the government on that occasion that we would be allowed under this vote and under this discussion to examine into those phases of the war appropriation measure of last year which might have been properly examined and inquired into on the occasion of the debate. Therefore I am deliberately taking the position this evening that we must move as quickly as possible into the committee stage of this bill for the purpose of hearing the statements of the ministers of the several departments, so that, thereafter, we may examine, exhaustively and effectively, every item of expenditure and the policies which the various ministers enunciate from time to time. If that is done, I think that in the days which lie ahead, in the committee stage of this bill, we shall render some reasonable service to the citizens of Canada by eliciting from the government that information to which the taxpayers are justly entitled.

Motion agreed to and the house went into committee, Mr. Bradette in the chair.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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NATIONAL DEFENCE

LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. RALSTON (Minister of National Defence):

Perhaps I should begin by reminding the house of an arrangement which was come to between the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon) and the other groups and the service ministers with regard to expediting, if possible, and with regard at least to regularizing and discussing in as orderly a manner as possible, the items that have to do with this resolution. It was arranged with the leader of the opposition and the other groups, in conference with the Prime Minister and the

War Appropriation-Army

defence ministers, that the committee in considering the resolution would endeavour to exhaust the discussion on each of the services in turn, so that there would not be overlapping and so that the members of the committee could prepare themselves with inquiries which they, desired to make. It was also understood that the amount included in the resolution for each of the services should be broken down under objects of expenditure in a manner somewhat similar to the method used in dealing with peace-time estimates, and in this connection-I pause to call the attention of the committee particularly to this- the objective was that all matters which it was required to discuss would be exhausted on each item, so that orderly and definite progress could be made, and when the discussion was concluded on that item it could be considered closed. In that way we would avoid the constant and time-wasting reversion to items already dealt with.

The Minister of Finance has already put on record that, in so far as the army is concerned, the amount included in the resolution is $1,764,000,000. And he also put on Hansard the different items under which that expenditure is to be authorized.

There have been different kinds of ministerial statements in the past few years. It is needless for me to refer to them. I just say that after trying two or three systems, speaking for myself, I am reverting to the system which I adopted in 1940, and without any apology to the committee I am going to try to cover a good deal of ground. I am sure that some of the material I have will be regarded by the committee as boring, but I am putting this information before the committee because I believe it will be useful and will give the country some information with regard to the activities of the army, and I can only say that the subject of the statement will be matters, for instance, with regard to the size and composition of the army and the general policy which we are endeavouring to pursue both in Canada and overseas with regard to mobilizing, enlisting, training and maintaining the arniy-and reinforcements of course. And the matter of man-power is very much to the fore; that vitally affects the army. I propose to remind the committee of the tasks of the army, and I wish to say a few words with regard to the development of the programme of the Canadian army overseas for both the past year and the year to come, the programme in Canada for the fiscal year which is past

and the fiscal year to come, including manpower. And I should like to touch on some special activities of the army in that connection.

I want to preface it with this, that I am going to try to make the statement as constructive, comprehensive and informative as possible, and if it is convenient for the committee I would hope to be allowed to proceed with as little interruption as possible. I think when I am finished the committee will be able to see the complete programme of the army, and then hon. members will be able to elicit such further information as they require on the points which interest them.

The subject with which I begin is a statement with regard to the tasks of the Canadian army. First let me say, that while we separate certain army activities in Canada from those overseas, we must remember that the army in Canada is the base and foundation of the overseas organization. The general role of Canada's army is to make Canada's weight felt as fully as possible in the fight to destroy the forces of the axis powers. On the assumption that Germany is the backbone of the axis, the strategy of the united nations is to direct the main operations against Hitler and his Italian satellite first.

To accomplish this, our job has been and is, and will be-because it is far from over yet- (a) to organize and maintain the strongest force of which we are capable, well forward in the main theatre of operations, for use wherever Germany and Italy can be met and overcome; (b) to cooperate in the defence of North America on our own coasts and in outpost positions with the object of (i) preserving the safety of our shores, our homes and our institutions from direct attack; (ii) carrying out our agreement with the United States for joint defence; (iii) maintaining a strongly defended base from which to provide, train and dispatch reinforcements; (iv) preserving a vitally important source of supply to the Canadian army here and overseas and to the united nations of raw material, foodstuffs and ammunition-which have been the subject of the bill just under consideration; (v) maintaining a strategic reserve to meet the unexpected at home or abroad.

Consequently our military forces are at present deployed in two main components, one in the European theatre of operations and

War Appropriation-Army

the other on this continent and its outposts. The two are connected by the Atlantic lifeline along which flows a stream of equipment, and trained reinforcements. The efficiency of the line of communication depends on the increase or decrease of U-boat strength, the number and nature of the tasks elsewhere for transport and escort craft and aircraft, and on the success of anti-submarine warfare and of the ship-building programme.

To come to the development of the Canadian army, there "has not been put on record or brought to the attention of the Canadian people the process of the development of the Canadian army. I think there is misapprehension in regard to that, and I should like to take the time of the committee for a moment in that connection.

The development of the army is a story of increase in strengths, increase in equipment and increase in training and fitness. People call for planning; I wish to say there has been a plan for the Canadian army. It has not been hit or miss. Mistakes have been made. It could hardly be otherwise in any organization that has increased one hundred times over since 1939, but I believe that the general principles on which we have worked have been sound.

Here is the sequence. Soon after war was declared we authorized the mobilization of the first and second Canadian infantry divisions, and within four months from the time war was declared we had the first infantry division in England. In the fateful and almost fatal year 1940 we authorized two more divisions, the third and. fourth infantry divisions, and early in 1941 we authorized the fifth armoured division and the first army tank brigade. That armoured division and that tank brigade were Canada's first ventures in armoured formations, and the Canadian armoured corps was set up.

We actually dispatched overseas the second infantry division in August, 1940. The first had been dispatched just before the end of

1939. A Canadian corps of two infantry divisions was formed overseas on Christmas day,

1940. Late that fall of 1940 I went to England, and after consultation with the war office our programme for 1941-42 was announced and approved by this house. Under that programme we were to dispatch in 1941 the third division, the fifth armoured division, the first army tank brigade and thousands of

ancillary troops. In the fall of 1941 another visit was made to the United Kingdom, and our plans integrated with theirs. We felt that instead of attempting to add to the five divisions we had (four overseas and one in Canada), our best contribution was not to form more divisions for overseas but 'to consolidate and organize what we had in such form as would make it capable of serving best.

The 1942-43 programme was settled and again authorized by this house. It was to form the second army tank brigade; to convert the fourth division into an armoured division and to send it overseas in 1942; to organize two corps, into which the three infantry divisions and the two armoured divisions could be fitted as circumstances might require; to provide the corps troops for those two corps, and to bring the two corps together under an army organization called the First Canadian Army and to provide army troops.

Let me stop to impress on the committee two points. Over two years ago, namely, early in 1941, all five divisions and an army tank brigade of our overseas army had been authorized, and what we have been doing in the past year is to make those individual forrhations as self-dependent and effective as our resources will permit. Secondly, the formations authorized since that time have- except the second army tank brigade-been the headquarters second corps and the headquarters first army and the corps and army troops which are ancillary and supplementary to these formations. I make those points because there seems to be in some quarters an idea that we have embarked on some new and overambitious policy regarding our overseas army. I would call attention to the fact that with the exception of the organization of the second corps and the army headquarters, and the additional army troops, the whole army programme was authorized early in 1941, nearly two years ago.

I have had prepared, thinking it might be useful to hon. members either now or in the future, a statement showing a summary of Canadian army units and formations dispatched or awaiting dispatch, showing the unit; when it was authorized; when it was announced and when it was dispatched, both for overseas and in Canada; also an indication of the sort of units we have in Canada and on outposts outside Canada but on the North American continent. With the permission of the committee I propose to have this summary placed upon Hansard:

War Appropria tion-Army

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
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SUMMARY OF CANADIAN ARMY UNITS AND FORMATIONS

May 13, 1943