May 12, 1943

QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS

FUEL PRODUCTION IN CANADA

NAT

Mr. CHURCH:

National Government

1. Is the mining of and distribution of coal and other forms of fuel considered or deemed to be a selective industry by the government?

2. What federal aid or bonus, subvention or subsidy, is being given by the government to aid an increase of coal and fuel production in Canada?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   FUEL PRODUCTION IN CANADA
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MILITARY SERVICE-PRODUCTION OF COAL

NAT

Mr. CHURCH:

National Government

1. How many have been called up for military active service who were engaged in coal distribution or delivery in Canada, during 1942, and to March 31, 1943?

Fourth Victory Loan

2. How many applications by military districts were made for postponement or temporary leave to aid in coal distribution or delivery?

3. How many of same were granted?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   MILITARY SERVICE-PRODUCTION OF COAL
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MOTION FOR PAPERS

SYNTHETIC RUBBER PLANTS

CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. KNOWLES:

For a copy of all correspondence, documents, memoranda, and orders in council, since the outbreak of the present war, relating to the establishment and/or construction of synthetic rubber plants in Canada.

Topic:   MOTION FOR PAPERS
Subtopic:   SYNTHETIC RUBBER PLANTS
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FOURTH VICTORY LOAN

INTERIM REPORT ON CAMPAIGN


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon) asked me yesterday if I would make a statement on the progress of the victory loan campaign.

The house will remember that a minimum objective of $1,100,000,000 was set for the fourth victory loan. This compares with an objective of $750 millions for the third victory loan, at which time $991 millions of victory bonds were sold. For the first time the minimum objective has been divided into two parts. The objective for special names, which consists chi'efly of corporations, was set at $600 millions, and an objective of $500 millions was set for individuals other than those included in the special names group. Figures received m Ottawa this morning as of the close of business last night show total purchases of S885 millions. Of this total there is $592 millions from the special names category, as against the objective of $600 millions. We expect that this part of our objective will be exceeded by a considerable amount. The objective of $500 millions for individuals must be obtained through the general canvass and through the payroll savings plan. The house will appreciate that there is considerable delay in reporting this class of purchase to headquarters in Ottawa, and it is impossible until some days after the loan to give an accurate figure in this classification. However, the recorded figures this morning show a total of $293 millions. Actual sales are known to be considerably in excess of this figure. I am informed by the national war finance committee that with four days to go in the fourth victory loan they estimate that a total of $400 millions is in sight -an amount already greater that the $375 millions obtained from this source in the third victory loan. The difference of $107 millions -that is, the difference betwen the $400 mil-

'Mr. Church.]

lions in sight and the $293 millions recorded is explained by an estimate of an additional $60 millions which it is expected will be obtained under the payroll savings plan and something under $50 millions of purchases in the general canvass resulting from the normal delay in receiving reports.

I would emphasize that the reconciliation between the actual recorded figures of $293 millions and where the canvass stands to-day is an estimate only. However, it is a rough measurement of what must be done during the next four days. The recorded figures without qualification would be misleading. It would appear, therefore, that we need at least $25 millions from the Canadian people, excluding the special names group, for each of the next four days if we are to attain our goal. There is a real task still before us, and I urge that in the next four days everyone who. has not already bought a bond consider his or her responsibility. I ask them to remember that every purchase is required if we are to meet the urgency of the present needs. Millions of Canadians have already bought bonds, but I ask these men and women to examine their budgets carefully in the hope that it may be possible for them to buy another bond, either by drawing more heavily upon their savings, or by taking advantage of the instalment plan. This will indicate that the Canadian people are responding with enthusiasm. I am confident that in the next few days Canadians will go forward with determination to complete the task which they have undertaken.

Topic:   FOURTH VICTORY LOAN
Subtopic:   INTERIM REPORT ON CAMPAIGN
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UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID

PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF $1,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES


The house resumed from Tuesday, May 11, consideration in committee of bill No. 76, for granting to his majesty aid for the purpose of making available Canadian war supplies to the united nations-Mr. Usley-Mr. Bradette in the chair. On section 2-Definitions.


LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

The other day I mentioned shipments of Canadian wheat and Canadian meat to Russia in virtue of the legislation passed last year. The Minister of Munitions and Supply rose and said that this government had not sent any meat to Russia. He was playing with words, because the government had purchased meat from Canada Packers and sent it to Great Britain, and from there it was sent to Russia. I complained that Canada Packers had sold rotten meat to Russia. It

Mutual Aid Bill

was sent to Great Britain and thence to Russia. Was it rotten or not? What is just as bad as that meat-not for me, because I do not care about it, but for all hon. members -is an editorial which was published to-day in the Globe and Mail, of Toronto. It mentions-

-a venomous and quite baseless personal attack upon Mr. J. Stanley McLean, the president of Canada Packers Ltd.-

*-by the member for Temiscouata; and here is the language used by that daily:

. . . the monstrous insinuation . . .

Here was a member of the House of Commons abusing the immunity from prosecution conferred on him to east baseless aspersions upon the integrity of a leading Canadian industrialist who enjoys high prestige as a public-spirited citizen and a zealous supporter of economic and social reforms.

But neither Mr. Howe nor any other member of the government had the courage or sense of duty to castigate Mr. Pouliot as he ought to have been castigated for his charges. Six days have now elapsed since the charges were made, but beyond Mr. Howe's mild denial not a word of reproof for them has come from ministerial lips. Surely it was the bounden duty of the Prime Minister, the leader of the House of Commons and also the leader of the nation, to make the most vigorous protest in his power against this unfounded attack upon one of the most enlightened industrial leaders in Canada. Who, if not a Prime Minister who always poses as such an ardent champion of democracy and the traditions of parliament, can afford protection against the bandying of groundless defamations on the floor of the commons against a private citizen? If some effort is not made to provide such protection parliament will cease to be regarded as a dignified high court of the nation.

This article is shameful, and I defy any hon. member to make such praise of Stanley McLean in his own constituency, because he is public enemy No. 1 of the farmer, and it can be established on any rostrum in this country.

I have never been impressed by the slanders and insults of any newspaper. The dirtier the paper is the greater the compliment for the insults which are bestowed upon me by such sheets as that. I am a friend and a defender of the under-dog, and that is why such a sheet is so bitter against the member for Temiscouata. And, of course, what I said was true. What I said, that there were condemnations amounting to S7,000 against Canada Packers Limited in Quebec city, was true. But there was a judgment which was rendered by the King's Bench and which is not any more complimentary to Canada Packers than to the Department of Munitions and Supply. Here is the summary which was published in the Canadian Press:

Quebec. May 10.-Mr. Justice Lueien Cannon to-day upheld the appeal of Canada Packers Ltd. against their conviction on a charge of selling low-grade beef at high-grade prices.

The company had been fined $7,000 and court costs for the alleged offence several months ago.

Mr. Justice Cannon said in his judgment-

-delivered in the appeal court-

*-that at the time the offence was allegedly committed in June, 1941, the meat situation was so confused-

"So confused"-mark that!

-that if there was a lack of first-grade meat "lower-grade meat might have been sold at first-grade prices."

He added that "prices board regulations allowed the meat dealers at the time to set prices themselves and, at the time the offence was committed, it was difficult to set prices adequately."

Jean Paul Galipeault and Lionel Forsyth, the lamp-post of St. James street, as I have always described him, represented Canada Packers.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF $1,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Mr. Chairman, I rise to a point of order.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF $1,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF $1,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Don't bark at me. I rise to a point of order. I rather hesitate, Mr. Chairman, to ask you to give a ruling, but I think the hon. member is absolutely out of order. He is speaking about something local and this clause of the bill deals entirely with those things in which we deal with the allied nations. I rise to a point of order, because I think the hon. gentleman is out of order.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF $1,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Mr. Chairman, I regret that the hon. gentleman cannot understand anything that is discussed in this house-[DOT]

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR APPROPRIATION OF $1,000,000,000 FOR PRODUCTION AND TRANSFER OF WAR SUPPLIES
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May 12, 1943