April 20, 1943

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

EASTER ADJOURNMENT

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That when the house adjourns on Wednesday, the 21st of April instant, it stand adjourned until Thursday, the 6th of May next.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Does that mean adjourning at six o'clock on Wednesday?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

It all depends.

I hope so.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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Motion agreed to. Labour Conditions


STATEMENT AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR IMPORTATION OF FEED WHEAT INTO UNITED STATES FROM CANADA


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. RALSTON (for the Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar (Mr. Coldwell) asked a question about negotiations for the sale of Canadian feed wheat in the United States market. I desire to make a statement on behalf of my colleague the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. MacKinnon), as follows:

Within the last several weeks discussions have taken place in Washington between the United States and Canada with reference to the question of the importation of wheat into the United States for feed purposes. Officials of the United States Department of Agriculture and the Commodity Credit Corporation directed an inquiry to this country as to the availability of feed supplies of both wheat and coarse grains. I am informed that these prospective imports are for the purpose of creating a reservoir of feed against eventualities. Discussions took place in Washington the early part of last week between United States authorities and Canadian officials. Canadian officials attending were T. C. Lockwood, Transport Controller, A. L. W. MacCallum, Chairman Canadian Shipping Board, George Mclvor, Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Wheat Board, and Doctor C. F. Wilson of the Department of Trade and Commerce. The question of transportation is vitally concerned, and the amount of grain that can be moved into the United States will be limited by available transportation facilities. This matter is now having the consideration of the transport controller and the railways, and developments are expected in the near future. In the meantime purchases have been made by the United States authorities in the regular way in the market for wheat for movement right after the opening of navigation. I am unable to give the house any definite information as to the quantity involved, which cannot be finally determined until the transportation problem is clarified. In addition to the wheat negotiations and sales, a continuous movement of coarse grains has taken place by all-rail shipment from western Canada, and commitments have been made for shipment of coarse grains on and after the opening of navigation.

72537-149J

Topic:   STATEMENT AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR IMPORTATION OF FEED WHEAT INTO UNITED STATES FROM CANADA
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

REPORTED MOVEMENT OF CANADIAN FARM LABOUR TO THE UNITED STATES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the leader of the opposition quoted a Washington dispatch to the Toronto Telegram of April 17 that 4,000 or 5,000 farm workers might be recruited by the United States government in Canada.

A few weeks ago representatives of the war man-power commission of the United States government were in Ottawa discussing with my officials and myself matters of mutual interest in connection with selective service. The situation in regard to farm labour was taken up, but it was made very clear to the United States delegation that there was no hope of any farm labour going from Canada to the United States. This statement was accepted as a fact.

This morning we were in communication with the commission at Washington and made, inquiries in regard to the press report. We were informed that the importation of men from Mexico and from the West Indies was in hand and that Washington fully realized that Canada could not be expected to supply any men.

In reviewing the situation in both countries with the United States officials when they were here the way was left open for a movement across the border of men from the south to assist in taking off such crops as Ontario tobacco and grain in the west. It is quite probable some movement of this kind will develop. We in turn agreed that we would consider allowing a few men to go from New Brunswick into the state of Maine for the potato harvest crop next fall. I am however very doubtful whether this will prove to be possible.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   REPORTED MOVEMENT OF CANADIAN FARM LABOUR TO THE UNITED STATES
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

May I ask what the minister means by "a few" men?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   REPORTED MOVEMENT OF CANADIAN FARM LABOUR TO THE UNITED STATES
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

I confess to wondering myself, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   REPORTED MOVEMENT OF CANADIAN FARM LABOUR TO THE UNITED STATES
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

But the difference between us is that the minister should not be in a position of wonderment. I should like to know what he means by a few. Is there to be a large exodus from New Brunswick to the United States or a comparatively small number?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   REPORTED MOVEMENT OF CANADIAN FARM LABOUR TO THE UNITED STATES
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

I should say if any at all it will be a comparatively small number.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   REPORTED MOVEMENT OF CANADIAN FARM LABOUR TO THE UNITED STATES
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

That will be "a few"-the same as where we started.

Supply-Parliamentary Assistants

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   REPORTED MOVEMENT OF CANADIAN FARM LABOUR TO THE UNITED STATES
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ALBERTA LEGISLATION

DISALLOWANCE OP LAND SALES PROHIBITION ACT

April 20, 1943