April 7, 1943

DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT

AMENDMENT TO REMOVE DISQUALIFICATION OF INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS FOR THE POOR


Mr. ROBERT FAIR (Battle River) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 65, to amend the Dominion Elections Act, 1938.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REMOVE DISQUALIFICATION OF INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS FOR THE POOR
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

This amendment is designed to remove the disqualification imposed on inmates of institutions for the poor where such persons are disqualified from voting at a provincial election. The removal of this disqualification will enable all such worthy persons to vote and also remove the existing anomaly of such persons being qualified to vote in some provinces and disqualified in other provinces.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REMOVE DISQUALIFICATION OF INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS FOR THE POOR
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PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 61, for the relief of Kathleen Ena Ball Royer.-Mr. Abbott. Bill No. 62, for the relief of Margaret Hed-drick Lieth Gauld-Mr. Claxton. Bill No. 63, for the relief of Elizabeth Alexandra Ida Robb Lewis.-Mr. Emmerson. Bill No. 64, for the relief of Joseph Aloysius Lavigueur.-Mr. Casselman (Grenville-Dun-das). Questions


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


WAKTIME HOUSING LIMITED-NEW GLASGOW, N.S., RESTAURANT

NAT

Mr. BLACK (Cumberland):

National Government

1. What are the prices charged for meals at the restaurant built by Wartime Housing Limited in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia?

2. How many meals were served to lodgers in the staff houses in February, 1943, and at what prices?

3. How many meals were served to other persons in February, 1943, and at what prices?

4. Does this restaurant pay taxes or licence fees to the town of New Glasgow? If so, how much per year?

5. Is this restaurant subsidized by the government or by war industries? If so, how much per year?

6. What is the deficit for January and February, 1943, and the estimated deficit for 1943, and by whom is it payable?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WAKTIME HOUSING LIMITED-NEW GLASGOW, N.S., RESTAURANT
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. Occupants of staff houses are charged $8.50 per week for room and board. Single meals are charged at 40 cents per meal and 30 cents per meal to staff employees.

2. Occupants of staff houses were served 1,749 meals in February, 1943.

3. (a) 494 meals were served to other than occupants of the staff houses in February, 1943. These included meals to employees in the cafeteria, workmen engaged in completing the installation, and guests of the occupants of the staff houses; (b) See answer to 1.

4. An agreement is now being negotiated with the town of New Glasgow covering service charges to be paid to the municipality for services rendered to Wartime Housing Limited.

5. No.

6. $555.83 was the restaurant deficit for January and February, 1943. We do not anticipate a deficit for the year 1943.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WAKTIME HOUSING LIMITED-NEW GLASGOW, N.S., RESTAURANT
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CANADIAN ARMY-OFFICERS AND MEN ON HEADQUARTERS STAFFS

NAT

Mr. TUSTIN:

National Government

1. Is there any age limit beyond which officers are not sent overseas with or to join our army overseas?

2. If so, what is the limit?

3. Are officers or men medically fit under 30 years of age employed on the headquarters staff, (a) in Ottawa, (b) overseas?

4. If so, how many?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMY-OFFICERS AND MEN ON HEADQUARTERS STAFFS
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LIB

Mr. RALSTON: (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. (a) Reinforcement officers, Canadian armoured corps, Royal Canadian artillery and

infantry must be:-major under 43 years of age; captain under 38 years of age; lieut. under 33 years of age.

Reinforcement officers, other arms and services, must be; major under 43 years of age; captain under 40 years of age; lieut. under 36 years of age.

(b) Officers and other ranks, other than reinforcements, are subject to review before proceeding overseas and only in special circumstances are they dispatched if they have passed the review age for their rank in their respective arm or sendee as follows: Canadian armoured corps, Royal Canadian artillery and infantry:-Lieut.-colonel 48 years; major 43 years; captain 38 years; lieut. 33 years.

Other arms and services:-Lieut.-colonel 48 years; major 43 years; captain 40 years; lieut. 36 years.

3. (a) Yes. (b) Yes.

4. (a) Ottawa, officers 114, other ranks 501-

as at 27 Mar. 43; (b) overseas, officers 39, other ranks 125-as at 30 Mar. 43. Note: The

figures for overseas headquarters do not include the officers and other ranks employed at army, corps and other headquarters in the field.

Most of the younger officers and men serving at headquarters are junior staff officers, technicians, and specialists appointed for a temporary tour of duty. In this way, these officers and men acquire experience in staff duties and methods before being posted to field formations and units.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMY-OFFICERS AND MEN ON HEADQUARTERS STAFFS
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INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL

PC

Mr. BENCE:

Progressive Conservative

1. Approximately what amount of industrial alcohol will be used in Canada in 1943?

2. Will any industrial alcohol be imported into Canada in 1943?

3. Will any industrial alcohol be exported from Canada in 1943?

4. Was any of the industrial alcohol produced in Canada in 1942 purchased by the federal government or any of its agencies?

5. If so, how much was so purchased and what price per gallon was paid therefor?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. Approximately 7,500,000 gallons.

2. No.

3. Yes.

4. Yes.

5. Approximately 2,000,000 gallons. The bulk of this alcohol was made from molasses imported by the government in 1941 for government projects. This was turned over to distillers for conversion into alcohol at a cost of 22 cents per gallon of alcohol, which price represented actual cost and a small profit for

Questions

conversion only. The molasses was secured through the sugar board of the United Kingdom to produce alcohol for use in plants working on United Kingdom orders.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL
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LABOUR REPRESENTATION ON WAR BOARDS

April 7, 1943