March 25, 1943

LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

-and he asked the Prime Minister to reply. Certainly that is a question which should not be asked on the orders of the day.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL CURRENCY
Subtopic:   DISCUSSIONS OF FINANCIAL PROBLEMS IN LONDON
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

The question was

whether a conference w:as proceeding, and if it was arriving at any decisions. The hon. member pointed out that those decisions might have world-wide consequences.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL CURRENCY
Subtopic:   DISCUSSIONS OF FINANCIAL PROBLEMS IN LONDON
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I was about to say that I believe this question will make perfectly clear the difference between questions which should be answered immediately and those which might stand for the order paper. My hon. friend was kind enough to send me a notice of the question he was going to ask. I received his memorandum just as I came into the house. It is the same question he has asked on two previous occasions and which I have answered on two previous occasions. All I can say now is that the answer I have given him on the two previous occasions is the answer I should like to give him now. If he will let this stand as a notice, I will give him something perhaps a little more formal in another statement later, but it will practically repeat what I have said up to the present.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL CURRENCY
Subtopic:   DISCUSSIONS OF FINANCIAL PROBLEMS IN LONDON
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

The only reason I asked the question is that this is a new set of negotiations.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL CURRENCY
Subtopic:   DISCUSSIONS OF FINANCIAL PROBLEMS IN LONDON
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

If it is a new set of negotiations, I am afraid my answer does not apply. As I read my hon. friend's question, he is asking as to what has been going on in the way of conferences or discussions over monetary matters. That is a pretty old question. Certainly it is one which he has now asked three times this session. I will give him a formal reply at another sitting. I can, I think, assure him that any conferences will not be ended before the reply is made.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL CURRENCY
Subtopic:   DISCUSSIONS OF FINANCIAL PROBLEMS IN LONDON
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SHIPSHAW DEVELOPMENT

REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"


On the orders of the day:


SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Munitions and Supply. In the press of March 24 there appears an article by R. T. Elson from the Washington news bureau of the evening Citizen under the following heading: "Feel Howe's Defence of Shipshaw

Incomplete." I was wondering if the minister would care to make a supplementary statement on this question in the light of that statement.

Topic:   SHIPSHAW DEVELOPMENT
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

I saw the article and it led me to believe that the text of my statement had not reached Washington when the article was written. It refers to two matters as not having been dealt with, when in, fact I dealt with them fully. I think I have nothing to add to the statement.

Topic:   SHIPSHAW DEVELOPMENT
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I was on my feet when Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury): The ministhe Prime Minister was on his. If he wishes ter would not say that the statement was to speak, he may do so. complete?

Privilege-Mr. Donnelly

Topic:   SHIPSHAW DEVELOPMENT
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"
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PRIVILEGE-MR. DONNELLY REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF MEMBER FOR BROADVIEW ON QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE ON MARCH 24


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas F. Donnelly

Liberal

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain):

Yesterday the hon. member for Broadview spoke in the house as follows, as reported at page 1516 of Hansard:

I wish to call to the attention of the house a speech made on March 22 by a friend of mine, the hon. member for Wood Mountain (Mr. Donnelly). I should like to read the words about which I complain, which appear at page 1447 of Hansard, and then to say a few words in order to indicate that the hon. gentleman has made a grave error. The hon. member said: "Let me turn for a moment to other members of the government. I remember back in 1927 and 1928 or thereabouts when our navy consisted of the Rainbow and the Niobe, the hon. member for Broadview (Mr. Church) spoke in this house and referred to our navy as consisting of these two ships and he asked: Where is our fleet now? And he answered in derision: Tied up in a garage at Halifax. Ah, but he does not say that now. Our fleet is to-day doing a man-sized job, sailing and patrolling the seven seas, and we are all proud of it. It is doing forty per cent of the convoy work in the north Atlantic. We are proud of our navy and the work it is doing, and hon. gentlemen do not deride it and poke fun at it to-day as they did in 1927 and 1928. It has grown from the two ships we had then to the splendid fleet we have now."

The hon. member then goes on to say: Not one word in the paragraph is correct.

I do not know what he is complaining about. Further down on the same page he is reported as follows:

My remarks about Halifax were made on June 21, 1926, at which time I said that if we were going to become an independent country under the statute of Westminster any foreign fleet might sail up the St. Lawrence and we could not oppose it because our navy might be locked up in a garage at Halifax.

I turn now to Hansard of February 1, 1928, at page 103, where I find the following:

We have a contemptible little navy which hugs the shores, never leaves our coasts, and for the past year has been locked up in a garage at Halifax.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DONNELLY REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF MEMBER FOR BROADVIEW ON QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE ON MARCH 24
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?

An hon. MEMBER:

Who said that?

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DONNELLY REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF MEMBER FOR BROADVIEW ON QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE ON MARCH 24
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LIB

Thomas F. Donnelly

Liberal

Mr. DONNELLY:

The hon. member for Broadview. I do not know what he is complaining about. As to the correctness of the rest of the statement, I leave it to the house.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DONNELLY REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF MEMBER FOR BROADVIEW ON QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE ON MARCH 24
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

On a question of privilege, the hon. gentleman should be kind enough to read all of what I said in 1928 and other years-it covers five pages of Hansard in 1928-and not quote only four or five lines. The same with the

other speeches on rearmament made fifteen years ago. There was then no fleet except two small ships which were obsolete. Under the Naval Act of 1910, it was provided that if anything happened out in the ocean an order in council would have to be passed before the fleet could fire off a gun. I never reflected at all on the men of the navy. I have always supported rearmament and if the hon. gentleman had done the same thing we would not have a five billion dollar tax bill to-day. He should read the whole of these speeches.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DONNELLY REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF MEMBER FOR BROADVIEW ON QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE ON MARCH 24
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HOUSING

INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO CONGESTED CONDITIONS IN TORONTO


On the orders of the day:


March 25, 1943