March 15, 1943

ANGLO-AMERICAN CONSULTATIONS CANADIAN REPRESENTATION-MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNDER STANDING ORDER 31

SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. E. G. HANSELL (Macleod):

Mr. Speaker, I ask for leave to move the adjournment of this house for the purpose of discussing a matter of urgent public importance. I refer to the matter of Canada's participation or non-participation in the present talks being carried on by representatives of the British government and the President and other officials of the United States.

Topic:   ANGLO-AMERICAN CONSULTATIONS CANADIAN REPRESENTATION-MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNDER STANDING ORDER 31
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Under standing order 31 an hon. member, desiring to move the adjournment of the house for the purpose of discussing a definite matter of urgent public importance rises in his place and gives notice and sends to the Speaker a statement of the reasons for his motion. The matter must be one of urgent public importance. If the matter is not in the opinion of the Speaker of such urgent public importance he may not put the motion to the house. In the suggestion made by the hon. member now I do not think there is such urgency as to justify the motion he has made; therefore I do not present it to the house.

Topic:   ANGLO-AMERICAN CONSULTATIONS CANADIAN REPRESENTATION-MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNDER STANDING ORDER 31
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


SELECTIVE SERVICE-SINGLE MEN ON FARMS

IND

Mr. LACOMBE:

Independent Liberal

1. Did the government authorize the director of selective service to announce that single men

[Mi. Wright.]

eligible for military training would be taken away from their farms in order to undergo military training?

2. If so, was this announcement broadcast by the C.B.C., and when?

3. Has the government authorized the same official to announce that single men as above mentioned, will be replaced on farms by unmarried men not qualified for military service?

4. If so, was this statement, (a) broadcast,

(b) when, (c) over what network?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SELECTIVE SERVICE-SINGLE MEN ON FARMS
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LIB

Mr. MITCHELL: (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

1. No.

2. Not to the knowledge of the government and certainly not with the authority of the government.

3. No.

4. No.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SELECTIVE SERVICE-SINGLE MEN ON FARMS
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PRAIRIE FARM INCOME BONUS-HOEY, SASK.

LIB

Mr. DOUGLAS (Weybum):

Liberal

1. Was the prairie farm income bonus paid to either Dr. F. P. Moreau or W. A. Boucher, of Hoey, Saskatchewan, or any member of their immediate family?

2. If so, what is the amount of the bonus paid?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PRAIRIE FARM INCOME BONUS-HOEY, SASK.
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LIB

Mr. GARDINER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. No.

2. Answered by No. 1.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PRAIRIE FARM INCOME BONUS-HOEY, SASK.
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CANADIAN COLLIERIES LIMITED


Mr. O'NEILL: 1. Is any monetary assistance being given by the government to Canadian Collieries Limited, Dunsmuir, B.C.? 2. If so, on what basis and what amount has been paid to this company to date?


LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. (1) Assistance paid to Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited in recovery of the cost of living bonus not covered by surcharge Sept. 1, 1941-Dec. 31, 1942, 174,373.88.

(2) Assistance under Order in Council P.C. 3971 of December 5, 1939 in respect to coal sold for ships' bunkers calendar year 1942, 8103,950.96.

(3) Payment by emergency coal production board as an accountable advance for production subsidy for November and December 1942, S62.850. This covers losses incurred due to increased costs and increased wage scales.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN COLLIERIES LIMITED
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CANADIAN ARMY (RESERVE)-MARRIED MEN TINDER THIRTY

NAT

Mr. GREEN:

National Government

1. Are married men under the age of thirty years eligible for enlistment in the reserve army?

Questions

2. If so, when was the change made which enables them to enlist?

3. Have there been any other changes since July 1, 1942, in the qualifications for enlistment in the reserve army?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMY (RESERVE)-MARRIED MEN TINDER THIRTY
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LIB

Mr. RALSTON: (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. Yes, provided they are not within the age classes designated by proclamation for military training under the national selective service mobilization regulations. Married men under the age of thirty years are therefore eligible for enlistment in the reserve army if

(a) they are between the ages of 17 and 19;

(b) born during the years 1917 to 1924, provided those born in 1924 have attained their nineteenth birthday and (1) they have been granted postponement of military training; or (2) they have been called but are found to be in a medical category below that prescribed as acceptable for military training under regulations made pursuant to the National Resources Mobilization Act, 1940.

(c) they were born prior to the year 1917;

(d) they belong to the classes of persons to whom the national selective service mobilization regulations do not apply, such as judges, clergymen, members of municipal police forces or fire brigades, etc.

(e) students undergoing approved military training under the national selective service mobilization regulations.

2. February 17, 1943-Canadian army order No. 86.

3. No. The only change made by Canadian order No. 86 was to provide that all married men born prior to 1917 are now permitted to join the reserve army, whereas previously those under the age of thirty were required to be in a medical category lower than "B".

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMY (RESERVE)-MARRIED MEN TINDER THIRTY
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INVENTIONS BOARD

SC

Mr. SHAW:

Social Credit

1. When was the inventions board established?

2. Was this board established by act of parliament or by order in council?

3. Who are the members of the board?

4. What is the procedure with respect to the handling of proposals, suggestions, etc., submitted to the board?

5. How many have been submitted to the board since it was established?

6. How many have been accepted in whole or in part?

7. What is the usual procedure with respect to the compensating of persons whose inventions have been accepted?

8. Who are the members of the examining committee of the inventions board?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INVENTIONS BOARD
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LIB

Mr. MacKINNON (Edmonton West): (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. January 24, 1940.

2. Order in council, P.C. 239.

3. The acting president, National Research Council, Chairman; acting deputy minister,

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Department of National Defence (Navy); deputy minister, Department of National Defence (Army); deputy minister, Department of National Defence (Air).

4. Proposals relating to inventions that are received directly by the board or referred to it by government departments, are submitted to an examining committee for investigation. The committee endeavours to ascertain if the invention contains any feature of practical utility not already known to those responsible for the prosecution of the war and is empowered to seek the advice of appropriate scientific or military consultants. The consultants include members of the scientific staff of the National Research Council and specially qualified officers of the armed services. Inventions considered to be worthy of development are referred to appropriate government departments or other organizations. Inventions are rejected on the grounds of impracticability or lack of novelty, or because the invention, though sound, is not needed, is already in use, or would require too long a time to develop to the effective stage.

5. To December 31, 1942 the total number of inventions received was 10,424.

6. The inventions board is not empowered to accept inventions. Its functions are to examine inventions, reject impracticable and unsound proposals and to assess the value of promising ideas and place them before the appropriate government officers. From 10 to 15 per cent of the proposals received are of such evident merit that they must be referred to the appropriate panel of consultants before a decision can be reached regarding them. About four-fifths of the proposals now being received deal with ideas which have been previously considered by the board or that are of slight technical interest but of no immediate military value.

7. The department which accepts the proposal is responsible for making all necessary agreements.

8. The secretary of the board, Mr. H. V. Haight, Mr. P. L. Pouliot.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INVENTIONS BOARD
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March 15, 1943