February 23, 1943

SOVIET UNION

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF ESTABLISHMENT OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY-TRIBUTE TO ITS VALOUR AND SPIRIT


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

To-day marks the celebration in the Soviet Union of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the establishment of the red army. Its achievements in the last twenty months have given to all the free peoples who have been resisting nazi aggression so much cause for encouragement and thanksgiving. I do not wish to allow the occasion to pass without reference in this house to the successes of the Soviet forces under the leadership of Premier Stalin. The whole free world is in their debt for what they have done to withstand the German invaders and to drive them from many thousands of square miles of Soviet territory. May their arms continue to be successful until victory over our common enemy is achieved.

Speaking of Russia's successes I should like to repeat in this house a warning which Mr. Eden gave to the people of Great Britain in his speech in London on Sunday. The foreign secretary of Great Britain pointed out that German propaganda was trying to succeed where German armies had failed and was making every effort to foster suspicion and encourage dissension between the allies by reviving the bogey of bolshevism and by representing Hitler as the saviour of western civilization. We must be on our guard in Canada against deceptions and propaganda of this kind. Inspired by mutual trust and confidence, begotten of common efforts, let us believe in and work for full and frank cooperation towards victory among all members of the united nations, and after victory has been won, towards a just and durable peace.

The past year has witnessed the establishment of direct diplomatic relations between Canada and the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics, which was announced in this house on June 12. Shortly afterwards we had the pleasure of welcoming to Canada Mr. Feodor Gousev as Soviet minister, and I am glad to be able to inform the house that Mr. Dana Wilgress will shortly establish the first Canadian diplomatic mission in the U.S.S.R. I am sure it is the fervent hope of all Canadians that the establishment of diplomatic relations is but the prelude to a long period of mutual

[Mr. St. Laurpnt.l

Soviet Union

understanding and cooperation between our two peoples, both in the conduct of the war and in the maintenance of a firm and durable

peace.

Impressive figures have recently been made public in the United Kingdom and the United States of the supplies furnished to the Soviet government by the united nations. I should like the people of Canada to know as fully as possible within the limits of military secrecy what portion of these supplies has been produced in Canada.

Out of a total of over six thousand tanks more than one thousand were manufactured in Canada. Two thousand universal carriers have gone forward to the U.S.S.R., as well as quantities of guns and over 22,000,000 rounds of ammunition of various types. We have sent to the Russian people military clothing and supplies. Many shiploads of strategic metals and materials have gone forward from Canada. In the field of foodstuffs the house will recall the Canadian-Soviet credit agreement under which a credit of $10,000,000 was extended to the U.S.S.R. to cover purchases of Canadian wheat and flour. The Canadian people have contributed $1,000,000 to the Canadian Red Cross Society and these funds have been used to supply essential medical supplies vitally needed on the Russian front. The Canadian aid to Russia fund has also completed an appeal for $1,000,000, to which the Canadian public have generously responded by subscribing in cash a sum considerably over $2,000,000. If the value of goods donated were added the total would be considerably over $3,000,000. Thus essential weapons, munitions of war and raw materials, foodstuffs and medical supplies have gone forward from Canada to strengthen the Russian people in the fight, while at the same time Canadian forces, together with their comrades in arms from each of the united nations, have hammered powerful blows against the common enemy.

In paying tribute to the valour and spirit of the Red army our admiration is equalled only by our determination to face the common enemy with like fortitude. To-day our common task in this vast struggle has brought Russia and Canada closer together. To-morrow, when the scourge of fascism has been blasted from the minds of free men everywhere, our peoples must work side by side to aid in the establishment of a world order based on inter-dependence and on the worth of human personality.

Topic:   SOVIET UNION
Subtopic:   TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF ESTABLISHMENT OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY-TRIBUTE TO ITS VALOUR AND SPIRIT
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I deem it a very great honour and privilege to associate the

TMr. Mackenzie King.]

Progressive Conservative party in this house with what has been said by the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King). It seems to me particularly appropriate that on this occasion, when the Red army is celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary, we in Canada should pay a well-deserved tribute to that great ally who in this war has shown a strength which perhaps many of us at one time thought she did not possess. The other day a German propagandist made this statement with respect to the present situation concerning Germany and Russia; that the Russians had broken loose with a power eclipsing all imagination. I think to-day we in Canada are only too pleased to have the opportunity to express something of our feelings and our thoughts with respect to the tenacity, the heroism and the bravery being shown by the Russian people, their army and their government in the interests of freedom and liberty throughout the world. As long as the voice of freedom is heard it will pay tribute to the valour, the endurance and the indomitable pluck of the Red army of Russia in this conflict, and I welcome this opportunity to pay tribute to so honourable and so staunch a fighting ally in this great cause.

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar); Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation I too should like to support what has been said by the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) and the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon). I am sure there is no one in this house or in the country who does not admire the bravery and fortitude with which our Russian allies have withstood the onslaught of a well-prepared, dangerous and bitter foe. A short time ago I was reading Ambassador Davis's "Mission to Moscow", and I was amazed at the appreciation he had, even before Munich, of the strength of the Russian army and the likelihood of its being able to withstand an onslaught from the west. To-day, in endorsing what the Prime Minister has said, may I suggest that it is part of our bounden duty to try to break down the suspicion that still exists in some quarters with regard to Russia, bearing in mind that in the days which will follow this great struggle Russia will play a leading part in the reconstruction of the world. Ever since Russia entered this conflict I have been hopeful that two things might happen: first, that Russia might become rather more democratic in its ways and its methods of government, and second that we, the democratic nations, might become rather more progressive.

Topic:   SOVIET UNION
Subtopic:   TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF ESTABLISHMENT OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY-TRIBUTE TO ITS VALOUR AND SPIRIT
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Soviet Union

Topic:   SOVIET UNION
Subtopic:   TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF ESTABLISHMENT OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY-TRIBUTE TO ITS VALOUR AND SPIRIT
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?

Thomas Miller Bell

Mr. COLD WELL:

I mean "progressive"

in the dictionary meaning of the word; when you tag on to it the word "Conservative" you have a conflict in terms. Therefore I should like to emphasize this hope that the association may do us both good.

I know that in some quarters there still lingers a feeling of fear of a repetition of the bolshevik revolution. Well, revolutions are recorded throughout the pages of history, and apparently the people who brought about those revolutions were not always ashamed of them later. If we look through the pages of our own history we find that in 1649 the English people had a revolution which spilled much blood and chopped off a king's head. The American revolution was a great historic event which also caused a good deal of unnecessary bloodshed, as did the French revolution. But out of these revolutions, deplorable though they were, came something better for the nations involved and something better for mankind; so perhaps, and I think indeed for certain, out of the revolution which took place in Russia we may see something better arise in that country.

May I leave with the house just one further thought. We all applauded when we heard of the splendid manner in which our Canadian people had responded to appeals for aid to Russia. This is as it should be; but I suggest that after all Russia is not asking for charity. I am indeed glad that the Minister of Finance (Mr. Ilsley), in presenting the resolution concerning the gift to the united nations on behalf of the Canadian people, has included all our allies. Therefore, Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the party with which I am associated I heartily concur in the sentiments expressed by the Prime Minister.

Topic:   SOVIET UNION
Subtopic:   TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF ESTABLISHMENT OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY-TRIBUTE TO ITS VALOUR AND SPIRIT
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, coming fourth in the list of speakers it may well be assumed that everything worth saying has been said. Therefore I think it is only necessary for me to add that our group heartily concur in the fine things that have been said.

Topic:   SOVIET UNION
Subtopic:   TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF ESTABLISHMENT OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY-TRIBUTE TO ITS VALOUR AND SPIRIT
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ALMONTE RAILWAY ACCIDENT

REQUEST FOR TABLING OF FINDINGS OF TRANSPORT COMMISSION


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

I should like to inquire from the Minister of Transport when he will be able to table the report of the board of transport commissioners concerning the railway wreck at Almonte on December 27.

Topic:   ALMONTE RAILWAY ACCIDENT
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR TABLING OF FINDINGS OF TRANSPORT COMMISSION
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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. J. E. MICHAUD (Minister of Transport) :

No doubt the hon. gentleman has reference to the findings of the board of transport commissioners following their investigation of the Almonte wreck. The findings, decrees and orders of the board of transport commissioners usually are tabled with their annual report, as required by the act. However, I shall see that a copy of this finding is sent to my hon. friend right away.

Topic:   ALMONTE RAILWAY ACCIDENT
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR TABLING OF FINDINGS OF TRANSPORT COMMISSION
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

I suggest that the

finding should be tabled in the House of, Commons, because it is of interest throughout the country. We should not have to wait until the tabling of the annual report.

Topic:   ALMONTE RAILWAY ACCIDENT
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR TABLING OF FINDINGS OF TRANSPORT COMMISSION
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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

I will ask that this report be included with those made up during the last year, and they will be tabled to-morrow or the day after.

Topic:   ALMONTE RAILWAY ACCIDENT
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR TABLING OF FINDINGS OF TRANSPORT COMMISSION
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PRIVILEGE-MR. MAYBANK DEFENCE OF CANADA REGULATIONS COMMITTEE- REFERENCE TO STATEMENT OF MR. GILLIS IN DEBATE ON FEBRUARY 22


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ralph Maybank

Liberal

Mr. RALPH MAYBANK (Winnipeg South Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I rise at this earliest opportunity to endeavour to wipe out what amounts to a reflection either intentionally or unintentionally cast upon me in the debate last , night. After I had left the house the hon. member for Cape Breton South (Mr. Gillis) declared with respect to the nonadoption of the report of the committee on the defence of Canada regulations that it was I who had in effect stood in the way of the report being presented for adoption, and that I was responsible for his, and members of his party, being prevented from securing the adoption of the report. I wish to indicate by the rules of the house how completely inaccurate such a statement or suggestion is. It is true, as I said in the house last night, that there is a measure of responsibility upon me; I freely and frankly took such responsibility last night. The hon. member's remark arose from the fact that I had stated that responsibility for the nonadoption rested on his shoulders as well as on those of other members of his party, and of Other hon. members in the house.

The facts are matters of record. I served notice that I would move the adoption of the report, and after forty-eight hours I was free to do so. But when I did not do so, then according to the rules and practices of the house, as is well known by a number of hon. members in the Cooperative Common-

Privilege-Mr. Maybank

wealth Federation party, any one of them was completely free to move the adoption. I cannot speak with certainty as to whether the hon. member for Cape Breton South was ignorant of or whether he had knowledge upon that particular point. I should have thought he was well aware of the position at all times, and that he himself knew he had that right; but if he would say I am wrong about that, naturally, I would accept his statement. However it is perfectly true that according to the rules and practices of the house it was the right of every hon. member of his party, or of any one of them, to move the adoption of the report, and each of them refrained from doing so.

The house, not I only, was at that time seized of that notice I had given. It was not I only who had the right to move the adoption of the report. It was the right also of the hon. member for Cape Breton South. But if he was not personally aware of his rights, then other hon. members of his party, and in particular his leader, or the hon. member of his group who sat , on the committee, certainly did know the facts. There can be no question about that.

One other point: It was the representative of his party who agreed with others-not with me, because I was not in agreement- that the adoption of the report should not be moved.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. MAYBANK DEFENCE OF CANADA REGULATIONS COMMITTEE- REFERENCE TO STATEMENT OF MR. GILLIS IN DEBATE ON FEBRUARY 22
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

I should like to have an interpretation of standing order 45. I may say that that was not my understanding of the rule. My understanding was that forty-eight hours' notice was given by an hon. member proposing to move concurrence. Discussing the matter this morning I told the hon. member for Cape Breton South that I did not think anyone who had not given notice had the right to move the adoption. I should like to have that cleared up, because it is an interesting point of procedure.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. MAYBANK DEFENCE OF CANADA REGULATIONS COMMITTEE- REFERENCE TO STATEMENT OF MR. GILLIS IN DEBATE ON FEBRUARY 22
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

There is no question

before the house on which a ruling must be given. The question should have been raised at the time the notice of concurrence in the report was given, and therefore I am not in a position at this time to make any distinction between the points made by the hon. member for Cape Breton South, the hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar, and the hon. member for Winnipeg South Centre.

Within the rules of the house the hon. member for Winnipeg South Centre has raised a question of privilege, as he was entitled to do. At the moment however there can be no discussion with regard to

what has been said in raising the question of privilege. That matter will have to be brought before me at some other time.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. MAYBANK DEFENCE OF CANADA REGULATIONS COMMITTEE- REFERENCE TO STATEMENT OF MR. GILLIS IN DEBATE ON FEBRUARY 22
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February 23, 1943