February 18, 1943

CIVIL SERVICE

INQUIRY AS TO PROGRESS IN CONSTRUCTION OP WOMEN'S HOSTEL IN OTTAWA


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Gordon Knapman Fraser

National Government

Mr. G. K. FRASER (Peterborough West):

I would like to ask the Minister of Munitions and Supply why work has not been rushed on the women's hostel in Ottawa. This morning's Ottawa Journal says:

Certainly no construction records are being broken in this project, which was launched by the government last summer, many months after the urgent need for such a hostel had been apparent to everybody else.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROGRESS IN CONSTRUCTION OP WOMEN'S HOSTEL IN OTTAWA
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

I will refer that inquiry to the Minister of Public Works.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROGRESS IN CONSTRUCTION OP WOMEN'S HOSTEL IN OTTAWA
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LIB

Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Hon. ALPHONSE FOURNIER (Minister of Public Works):

If my hon. friend will let his question stand as a notice, I will give an answer to-morrow.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROGRESS IN CONSTRUCTION OP WOMEN'S HOSTEL IN OTTAWA
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PC

Norman James Macdonald Lockhart

Progressive Conservative

Mr. LOCKHART:

May I ask that the Minister of Public Works, in replying to the specific question of the hon. member for Peterborough West (Mr. Fraser), include any recommendations that may have been made with respect to hostel accommodation at other points-that is, make a general report so as to cover the whole matter?

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROGRESS IN CONSTRUCTION OP WOMEN'S HOSTEL IN OTTAWA
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LIB

Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. FOURNIER (Hull):

The only hostel coming within the jurisdiction of the Department of Public Works is the hostel in Ottawa. The others were put up by the Department of Munitions and Supply.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROGRESS IN CONSTRUCTION OP WOMEN'S HOSTEL IN OTTAWA
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PC

Norman James Macdonald Lockhart

Progressive Conservative

Mr. LOCKHART:

Then may I ask that that information, whether obtained from the Department of Munitions and Supply or elsewhere, be included at the time the report is made?

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROGRESS IN CONSTRUCTION OP WOMEN'S HOSTEL IN OTTAWA
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SOCLAL SECURITY

SUGGESTED OPPORTUNITY FOR DISCUSSION PRIOR TO MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

I would ask the Prime Minister a question of which I have given him notice. Would he be good enough to consider, in connection with social security and the Beveridge report, following the practice of the mother of parliaments, where a committee was appointed but where they had a two-days' debate in the house before the committee met? On the govern-

Social Security

ment benches here there are splendid men who have come up from the municipalities and who are well qualified to discuss this question. I think it would be well to do what was done in Great Britain and give members of the house an opportunity to express their opinions in a non-political debate which might form a chart for the course to be taken by the committee.

Topic:   SOCLAL SECURITY
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, my hon.

friend sent me a communication indicating that he intended raising this question. I must say that the more I have considered it the more I feel that it would not be advisable to act upon the suggestion of my hon. friend to have a debate upon the Beveridge report in this house before the matter of social security is referred to a special committee. My hon. friend has just said that the mother of parliaments has followed a certain course. That course, as I take it, was to discuss at Westminster a report which related to the conditions in the United Kingdom. That would be quite proper. But the Beveridge report does not relate, except so far as general principles are involved, to conditions as they exist in this country. In Great Britain most of the matters which are referred to in the Beveridge report come before only one government. In Canada social security is a matter controlled in part by the federal government, in part by the provincial governments. I think it would be wholly advisable that a committee of this house should have the opportunity of considering that aspect of the broad question of social security before we begin a debate on any one particular report.

May I draw my hon. friend's attention to the fact that, in the notice I have given for the appointment of a committee on social security, I expressly request the house to permit the committee to examine and study social insurance policies of other countries. Social insurance policies of other countries will include the Beveridge report. I would think it would be preferable that a discussion of the Beveridge report, so far as it is desirable to have it in this house, would come after members of the committee had had an opportunity of familiarizing themselves with the report.

But there is an even stronger objection to proceeding along the lines which my hon. friend has indicated. The Minister of Finance (Mr. Ilsley) is anxious to proceed as soon as may be possible with the war appropriation for the coming year. The minister is also anxious to place before the

country, as soon as he can, the budget, so that the people of Canada may have an appreciation of what is involved in the recommendations which the minister will have later to make to the house with respect to the ways and means of raising the revenues required. To proceed with a debate on the Beveridge report before these all-important war measures-because the budget will be that in considerable part as well-are considered by the house would, I think, place an entirely wrong emphasis on the importance of the matters which should be considered at this time, or first of all in this parliament.

I want to take advantage of this moment to say to my hon. friend and to the house-

I said it before, and I wish to repeat iU- that there is a great danger of hon. members of the house and of people throughout the country getting the impression that this war is going to be won in the course of this year, and that what we have most to be concerned about at the present time is what is going to happen after the war, rather than before the war itself is won.

I do not believe it is possible to emphasize too strongly with respect to the progress of the war, the serious situation which exists at this moment, and which lies ahead. As yet there has been no invasion of Europe by armed forces of the allied powers, and up to now Germany continues to control the countries which she has already conquered. She is being driven back at the present time by Russia; but apart from that, the whole problem of the war, as to when and how the axis powers are to be defeated, still remains something which is completely unsolved. It is going to take all the efforts that all the allied powers can make to win the war in the course of a very considerable time. I believe that the more we impress that upon the people of this country, the better it will be for the good of all. If this house begins to take up at the beginning of a session discussions of a post-war matter, before we have even had an opportunity to discuss our war measures, I am sure we would be setting a wholly false example and would be conveying a wholly wrong impression to the country.

Topic:   SOCLAL SECURITY
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED OPPORTUNITY FOR DISCUSSION PRIOR TO MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

The only thing I would say is that probably the select committee will [DOT] not present its report until the dying hours of the session-

Topic:   SOCLAL SECURITY
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED OPPORTUNITY FOR DISCUSSION PRIOR TO MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Oh, no; there is every desire-

Topic:   SOCLAL SECURITY
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED OPPORTUNITY FOR DISCUSSION PRIOR TO MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

-and no action will be taken this session, as happened last session with some of these select committees.

The Address-Mr. Blanchette

Topic:   SOCLAL SECURITY
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED OPPORTUNITY FOR DISCUSSION PRIOR TO MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am sure

the committee will use all the expedition possible. The committee will be appointed within the course of another few days. I think there is every reason to believe that its report will be made in time for a discussion of the matter at this session.

Topic:   SOCLAL SECURITY
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED OPPORTUNITY FOR DISCUSSION PRIOR TO MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY

February 18, 1943