February 15, 1943

MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNDER STANDING ORDER 31

IND

Joseph Sasseville Roy

Independent

Mr. J. SASSEVILLE ROY (Gaspe):

-Mr. Speaker I wish to ask leave to move the adjournment of the house for the purpose of discussing a definite matter of urgent public importance, namely, the immediate appointment of a representative of the French-Canadian element on the national war labour board, it being urgent that such appointment be made before the said board begins to function, and necessary because of the importance of the large group of French-Canadian workers.

Topic:   NATIONAL WAR LABOUR BOARD
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNDER STANDING ORDER 31
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

In my opinion there is

not that degree of urgency which would justify a motion for the adjournment of the house.

Topic:   NATIONAL WAR LABOUR BOARD
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNDER STANDING ORDER 31
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RATIONING

STATEMENT AS TO DISTRIBUTION OF RATION BOOKS THROUGH LOCAL BOARDS

LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

The hon. member for Broadview (Mr. Church) on February 3 on the orders of the day asked a question about the distribution of ration books. I thought it would be much more convenient if I could table the answer, which I now do. It is as follows:

Under war conditions there has been tremendous movement of population. No agency who has tried to do so has ever been very successful in obtaining notification of changes of address. It is estimated that the post office, which one would expect to be in a very strong position, receives only about one-third of the address changes. There are numerous indications which point to the fact that the ration administration is not being notified of a great percentage of the address changes. When book No. 1 was distributed by mail the ration administration had a mailing list which was only three months old and which they had kept up to date by

Ration Books

making all changes of which they were * advised. Nevertheless in the city of Toronto alone, 62,000 of these books were returned to them. It was a most laborious process to get these into the proper hands and inevitably the book holders were greatly inconvenienced. In the six months which have elapsed since that date, additional address changes have accumulated. About half the population of the dominion has no street address. They collect their mail from rural routes or from general delivery.

The ration administration has available now an organization comprising local ration boards which form the basis for distribution. Volunteer workers have been enthusiastic in their offers to help and the ration administration expect the job to proceed with little inconvenience.

In spite of precautions taken, some persons have received two books. Worked out on a percentage basis, the number of these is small; however, they should be eliminated if possible. While some persons accept two books mailed to them at different addresses, it would be much less likely that they would deliberately present themselves twice to make applications.

Expense is also a factor of some importance. In order to distribute the ration books through the post office, millions of pieces of mail would have to be handled and the ration administration would be involved in considerable expense in readdressing books returned to them owing to change of address.

It is perhaps worth mentioning that the distribution of book No. 2 differs from that of book No. 1 by the fact that the former includes butter coupons which have an expiry date. When book No. 1 was distributed anyone who received his book a few weeks late at least had the satisfaction of knowing that he could still use all the coupons. With book No. 2 it would bo different to the extent that anyone receiving a book a few weeks late will have lost the opportunity of using some of the butter coupons.

Topic:   RATIONING
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO DISTRIBUTION OF RATION BOOKS THROUGH LOCAL BOARDS
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOE PAPERS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

My hon. friend the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon) asked a week or two ago if we might not follow this session the practice followed in previous sessions of having questions answered once a week until the debate on the address is over. The government agreed to that. Last week questions were answered on Monday and we are prepared with the consent of the house to proceed with questions to-day.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOE PAPERS
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.) INTERNATIONAL LABOUR CONFERENCE-DRAFT


CONVENTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN

IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

Referring to the statement made by the then Minister of Labour, as recorded in Hansard on May 31, 1939, to the effect that the provision of certain draft conventions, numbers 53 to 57 inclusive, affecting seamen, adopted at the international labour conventions in 1936, were being given examination and that parliament would be advised in due course-has this been done and, if so, what were the decisions arrived at or what action is proposed?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CONVENTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

As stated by the late Hon. Mr. Rogers, Minister of Labour, in the house on May 31, 1939, consideration was given to the possible ratification of conventions Nos. 53-57, inclusive, all of which relate to seamen, but with the outbreak of war and the demands made on Canadian shipping, no further action was taken concerning these conventions which could have imposed additional burdens on the shipowners and, in the case at least of numbers 53, 54 and 57, would have required additional man-power. The government, however, is continuing to study the question of implementing some or all of these conventions.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CONVENTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS AFFECTING SEAMEN
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IRREGULARITIES IN WAR INDUSTRIES

IND

Mr. LACOMBE:

Independent Liberal

1. Has the government taken any steps to prevent irregularities discovered in certain war industries since the beginning of the war?

2. Has the government employed the services of chartered accountants to inquire into the operations of such companies?

3. If so, (a) when, (b) in connection with what companies, (c) with what results?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IRREGULARITIES IN WAR INDUSTRIES
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. Yes.

3. It is not in the public interest to give the information.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IRREGULARITIES IN WAR INDUSTRIES
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WARTIME HOUSING-ACCOMMODATION FOR WOMEN IN PETERBOROUGH STAFF HOUSE

NAT

Gordon Knapman Fraser

National Government

Mr. FRASER (Peterborough West):

What is the reason for Wartime Housing Limited not making provision to use part of the staff house at Peterborough for women?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME HOUSING-ACCOMMODATION FOR WOMEN IN PETERBOROUGH STAFF HOUSE
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

In October, 1941, following a survey of munition plants in Peterborough, it was recommended by the Department that two staff houses be erected in Peterborough

one for men and one for women. This was approved by P.C. 8874, dated November 18,

Questions

1941. It was felt that caution should be exercised in proceeding with two staff houses at one time. It was thought probable that the erection of one staff house might release enough accommodation in Peterborough to make the construction of a second one unnecessary. As the industries in Peterborough considered their first necessity to be housing accommodation for men, a men's staff house was first proceeded with.

Should it be that the condition arises whereby only one staff house be necessary to house both the men and women unable to be housed other than in staff houses, then the Peterborough staff house can, by minor and simple modification, be made to house both men and women workers. The Department of Munitions and Supply as a matter of principle is averse to housing men and women in the same building if it can be avoided. The department, at the present time, has no reason to believe that the present staff house will not be entirely required for men, and it has no advice that accommodation for women is presently needed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME HOUSING-ACCOMMODATION FOR WOMEN IN PETERBOROUGH STAFF HOUSE
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February 15, 1943