February 1, 1943

JOINT DEFENCE PROJECTS

EXCHANGE OP NOTES BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES AS TO POST-WAR DISPOSITION

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr.'Speaker, I wish to table, in English and French, an exchange of notes between Canada and the United States, dated January 27, 1943, relating to the postwar disposition of certain defence projects, installations and facilities constructed in Canada by the United States.

To carry out joint plans for the defence of this continent, and to facilitate the transportation of war materials to fighting fronts, the Canadian government has agreed to the stationing of United States military units at certain places on Canadian territory. This is part of the same programme of war-time cooperation which has resulted in units of the Royal Canadian Air Force operating from Alaskan bases.

In carrying out the defence programme, moreover, arrangements have been made whereby the United States government has supplied materials for, or has defrayed the

Joint Defence Projects

cost of, the construction of a number of projects, installations or facilities on Canadian soil.

The arrangement under which this programme has been effected is of a purely wartime character. It is not contemplated that the contribution which the United States is thus making to the common defence will give that country any continuing rights in Canada after the conclusion of war. Indeed, with regard to most of the projects that have been undertaken in this country by the United States, agreements have already been made which make the post-war position completely clear. An example with which hon. members will be familiar is to be found in the text of the exchange of notes providing for the construction of the Alaska highway.

In order that there may be no possible doubt as to the principles to be followed in the postwar disposition of the various defence projects to which the United States has contributed, the permanent joint board on defence recently recommended that the two governments approve a formula which would state these principles in clear terms. The formula which was proposed by the defence board was examined by the two governments and was approved by both. It has now been embodied in the exchange of notes I am about to table.

An examination of the notes will make it apparent that the agreements with the United States do not prejudice in any way Canadian post-war liberty of action. I ought to add that I am informed by those most directly connected that with respect to these projects, not only is Canada free from any post-war commitments, but that we have not at any time been asked by the United States to enter into such commitments.

The terms of the exchange of notes will make it clear that should Canada undertake to contribute to the joint defence by constructing installations or facilities in Alaska or elsewhere on United States territory, the same principles would reciprocally apply.

Topic:   JOINT DEFENCE PROJECTS
Subtopic:   EXCHANGE OP NOTES BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES AS TO POST-WAR DISPOSITION
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

May I ask the Prime Minister if he intends to have these notes printed? How will they be distributed?

Topic:   JOINT DEFENCE PROJECTS
Subtopic:   EXCHANGE OP NOTES BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES AS TO POST-WAR DISPOSITION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

It might be advisable to have the exchange of notes printed in the Votes and Proceedings of to-day. A similar statement is being made at Washington this afternoon. That was my reason for being anxious to make to the house to-day the statement which I have just made.

Topic:   JOINT DEFENCE PROJECTS
Subtopic:   EXCHANGE OP NOTES BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES AS TO POST-WAR DISPOSITION
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NAT

John Ritchie MacNicol

National Government

Mr. MacNICOL:

May I ask the Prime Minister if what he has said in reference to the Alaska highway applies also to the roadway being built from Peace River to Providence? The United States at the moment are building a roadway north of the Peace river through a place called Notikewin to Providence, on the Mackenzie river. Does the same agreement apply? When the war is over will they retire from there also?

Topic:   JOINT DEFENCE PROJECTS
Subtopic:   EXCHANGE OP NOTES BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES AS TO POST-WAR DISPOSITION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

It applies to all projects, which relate to the war, which the United States installs or constructs in Canada during the period of the war.

Topic:   JOINT DEFENCE PROJECTS
Subtopic:   EXCHANGE OP NOTES BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES AS TO POST-WAR DISPOSITION
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CHIEF JUSTICE OF CANADA

EXTENSION OF TERM OF OFFICE FOR FOUR YEARS FROM JANUARY 7, 1940


Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Minister of Justice) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 2, to amend an act respecting the Chief Justice of Canada. He said: The purpose of this bill is to extend for four years from January 7, 1940, instead of for three years, as had been provided, the term of office of the chief justice. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time. DIVORCE


AMENDMENT OF ACT OF 1930-JURISDICTION OF COURTS IN PROVINCE OF MARRIED WOMEN'S DOMICILE


Mr. GEORGE BLACK (Yukon) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 3, to amend the Divorce Jurisdiction Act, 1930. He said: This bill has been on the order paper now for two sessions under public bills, and as public bills have not been dealt with for the past two sessions it remained as it was. Before introducing it two sessions ago I discussed the bill with the late minister of justice, the Right Hon. Ernest Lapointe, and after considering it he pronounced it proper legislation and legislation that should be passed. As the Divorce Jurisdiction Act stands now, an applicant for divorce must bring the action in the province in which desertion takes place. For instance, if a British Columbia man marries a girl in Ontario, takes her back to British Columbia, and there deserts her, she may be obliged to return to her home in Ontario. She has the evidence which would entitle her to a divorce but she must go back to the province in which she was deserted in order to bring action. The proposed amendment will enable the applicant to bring action in the court of the province in which she is domiciled, provided that she has lived in that province for two years or more. Labour Conditions


LABOUR CONDITIONS

VISIT TO OTTAWA OF REPRESENTATIVES OF MONTREAL DISTRICT AIRCRAFT WORKERS


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

I desire to make an inquiry of the Prime Minister with respect to a matter that has come to my attention this afternoon. Some thirty representatives of Montreal Aircraft Lodge No. 712, covering a jurisdiction of about twenty thousand aircraft workers in four plants in the Montreal district, are in Ottawa, and from conversations I have had with them I rather think the situation there has deteriorated to such an extent that I am compelled to ask the right hon. gentleman if he will be good enough to make some intervention in the matter so that in the national interests the position will not become worse. I make this request in all sincerity of purpose because in my opinion it is greatly in the national interest that the Prime Minister should see these men and perhaps intervene so that the situation will not develop into something which will be detrimental to our war production. I wonder if he would give consideration to this suggestion.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   VISIT TO OTTAWA OF REPRESENTATIVES OF MONTREAL DISTRICT AIRCRAFT WORKERS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

May I say to my hon. friend and to hon. members of the house that at this time of war there is of course no more important service, next to that performed by our armed forces, than the continuous production of war industries in this country, and wherever it has been possible to do so, I have done my utmost to help to further both these large objectives. With respect to the specific request of my hon. friend, that I should of my own initiative, I take it, see some members of the aircraft industry, employees who are in the city at the present time, I would say to him that, as I am sure he will understand, in matters of this kind I have to consider not merely the immediate situation but what may come to be looked upon as the course of procedure which is to be the regularly recognized and adopted one. The Department of Labour is the department^ of government which primarily has to do with industrial disputes. I am aware that some members representing employees of the aircraft industry were in the city on Saturday of last week and that others were here to-day. On Saturday I communicated with the Department of Labour to ascertain what steps

were being taken towards conferring with these representatives. I was told at the t.imP I communicated that three or four of the representatives were then in conference in the Department of Labour with one or more officers of the department and that consideration was being given to their representations. I believe it is also true that the matter to which my hon. friend has referred is one which comes in part at least within the jurisdiction of the regional board which is located at Quebec, and I understand that an officer of the Department of Labour has been in Quebec, and possibly is there to-day, looking into the situation.

I should like to have it understood and known that if it is necessary for me personally to intervene in industrial disputes it must be only after the matter has been carefully considered by the cabinet as a whole. I cannot as Prime Minister, with the obligations I have to meet, much as I should like to be able to be of assistance, undertake to meet delegations that come to the city to discuss industrial disputes. Moreover, there is, I think, reason why the greatest possible caution should be exercised in having the government as ^ a government intervene in any dispute which it is possible to have settled between the parties themselves, or under the machinery which is provided by the government.

I will carefully consider my hon. friend's request, but I have to make it clear that all these matters should follow a line of procedure which is definitely known and which has been framed with a view to facilitating adjustments.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   VISIT TO OTTAWA OF REPRESENTATIVES OF MONTREAL DISTRICT AIRCRAFT WORKERS
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

My information is that this suggestion is made only after other avenues of approach have been thoroughly explored. May I also point out, in case the Prime Minister is under any misapprehension as to the basis of the dispute that in this instance it is not a dispute between employers and employees. I should like to ask the Prime Minister whether it is possible for him to give any undertaking that the question wilt come before the cabinet, if he is not able personally to intervene.

_ Mr. MACKENZIE KING: I have pleasure in saying that I shall see that the matter is considered immediately by the government. As a matter of fact, it has been before the government already.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   VISIT TO OTTAWA OF REPRESENTATIVES OF MONTREAL DISTRICT AIRCRAFT WORKERS
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REPORTS AS TO UNEMPLOYMENT IN THE CITY OF WINNIPEG


On the orders of the day: [DOT]


February 1, 1943