January 27, 1943

THE KING'S BIRTHDAY

REPLY OF HIS MAJESTY TO RESOLUTION EXTENDING GREETINGS AND GOOD WISHES

LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that I have received the following communications:

Government House, Ottawa,

17th August, 1942.

Sir:

With reference to your letter of the 9th June last, I am desired by His Excellency the Governor General to forward herewith a letter from Buckingham Palace containing the King's reply to the resolution adopted by the House of Commons on the occasion of the official celebration of His Majesty's birthday.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient servant,

F. L. C. Pereira, Assistant Secretary to the Governor General.

Buckingham Palace,

14th July, 1942.

The Speaker,

House of Commons of Canada.

Dear Mr. Speaker,

The King has received from the Governor General a copy of the resolution adopted by the House of Commons of Canada on the occasion of the official celebration of his birthday. 415*1-327

His Majesty deeply appreciates the terms of this resolution and the kindly sentiments towards himself to which it gives expression. I am to ask you to be good enough to convey to the members of the house the King's sincere thanks for their message, which is to him a source of real encouragement.

Yours sincerely,

Alexander Hardinge.

Topic:   THE KING'S BIRTHDAY
Subtopic:   REPLY OF HIS MAJESTY TO RESOLUTION EXTENDING GREETINGS AND GOOD WISHES
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PROROGATION OF PARLIAMENT

MESSAGE FROM THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SECRETARY

LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform the house that I have received the following communication:

Ottawa, January 15, 1943.

Sir:

I have the honour to inform you that the Honourable Thibaudeau Riafret, acting as Deputy of His Excellency the Governor General, will proceed to the Senate chamber on Wednesday, the 27th day of January, at four p.m., for the purpose of proroguing the present session of parliament.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient servant,

F. L. C. Pereira, Assistant Secretary to the Governor General.

Topic:   PROROGATION OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   MESSAGE FROM THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SECRETARY
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VACANCIES

LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that during the adjournment I received communications from several members, notifying me that the following vacancies have occurred in the representation, viz:

Of Thomas Vien, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Outremont, by resignation;

Of Honourable Joseph Thorarinn Thorson, member for the electoral district of Selkirk, consequent upon the acceptance of an office of emolument under the crown;

Of Harry Raymond Fleming, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Humboldt, by decease;

Of Peter Bercovitch, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Cartier, by decease.

I accordingly issued my several warrants to the chief electoral officer to make out new writs of election for the said electoral districts, respectively.

Topic:   VACANCIES
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NEW MEMBERS

LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that the clerk of the house has received from the chief electoral officer certificates of the election and return of the following members, viz:

<5190

Casablanca Conference

Of Honourable Leo Richer LaFleche, for the electoral district of Outremont;

Of Stanley Howard Knowles, Esquire, for the electoral district of Winnipeg North Centre;

Of Frederic Dorion, Esquire, for the electoral district of Charlevoix-Saguenay.

Topic:   NEW MEMBERS
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NEW MEMBERS INTRODUCED


Hon. Leo Richer LaFleche, member for the electoral district of Outremont, introduced by Right Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King and Hon. L. S. St. Laurent. Stanley Howard Knowles, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Winnipeg North Centre, introduced by Mr. M. J. Coldwell and Mr. Angus Maclnnis. M. Frederic Dorion, depute de la circon-scription electorate de Charlevoix-Saguenay, est presente par M. J.-Sasseville Roy et M. Jean-Franrois Pouliot.


CASABLANCA CONFERENCE

MEETING OF PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL AND PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, TOGETHER WITH CHIEFS OF STAFF, IN NORTH AFRICA

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

It is always a pleasure at the beginning of a new session of parliament, Mr. Speaker, or following the prolonged adjournment of an existing session, to have the opportunity of greeting members once more and renewing the associations of parliament. I feel that this pleasure is greatly enhanced to-day in virtue of the announcement made over the radio last night of the conference which took place at Casablanca, in North Africa, between the Prime Minister of Great Britain and the President of the United States. Although the business of this session is virtually concluded, and what remains is largely formal procedure, I feel that hon. members would wish to have some mention made of the conference, that in the proceedings of the house it may be on record as having taken place within the period of this particular session.

When the session was adjourned almost six months ago the fortunes of the united nations had reached a place where it seemed that they were almost at the darkest hour since the beginning of the war. In the interval, since adjournment, the scene has changed in nearly all parts of the world. With the achievements of the British forces in Egypt and Libya; with the landing of British and American forces in North Africa, and the successes there; with the unrelaxing, heroic resistance of the Chinese, and the magnificent successes of the

Russians, and the gains in the Southwest Pacific, we now have come to a time when we may justly feel that the fortunes of war have greatly changed, that the allied and the axis powers are more evenly balanced, and that the outlook gives every reason for hope and encouragement as far as the future is concerned.

Nothing could have afforded more in the way of fresh light on the horizon than the news of the meeting which has taken place during ten recent days at Casablanca, and particularly the announcement that, as a result of the conference of the Prime Minister of Great Britain and the President of the United States and the experts who accompanied them, the British and American leaders, both civil and military, have arrived at an agreement with respect to the plan of war which has been so worked out, it is hoped, as to enable the allied forces to maintain throughout this present year the initiative which they have now gained.

I shall not attempt to go into matters pertaining to the conference. During the new session there will be opportunity to discuss all matters relating to the war, and also, if it is desired, to give such information as it may be possible to make public with respect to the conference at Casablanca.

I should add, however, that one of the gratifying features of the conference, in addition to those I have mentioned already, is the further announcement that there has been a meeting between General de Gaulle and General Giraud which we hope will lay the foundations of an enduring union between the forces of the fighting French and those under General Giraud. I am sure, too, that there will be great satisfaction in the announcement that both China and Russia have received from the conference assurances of the additional aid which it is going to be possible for them to receive from the other united nations during the continuance of the war.

In a word, I am sure this House of Commons would wish it to be known that it views with the greatest possible satisfaction the conference which has taken place, both the fact that there has been such a conference and the announcement which has been made in reference to its proceedings; and that we cherish no hope more profoundly than that the plan which has been worked out may be realized in the fullest possible measure during the course of the present year.

Topic:   CASABLANCA CONFERENCE
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL AND PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, TOGETHER WITH CHIEFS OF STAFF, IN NORTH AFRICA
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the. Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, every' lover of

Casablanca Conjercnce

freedom and liberty, and of our cherished civilization, took new heart last night. The people of Canada who from the very beginning have made this fight their own will renew their strength and their confidence in the ultimate outcome of the great struggle in which we are engaged.

I must say my admiration for Mr. Roosevelt never rose higher than it did when I learned about his conference with Mr. Churchill. Whatever criticism may be levelled against the President in his own country, no one will ever be able to say that he is not a man of great courage and resolution. Nor can it be said that he is not a world leader, and a world leader of whom all of us in all allied countries may be very proud.

Of course we expect Mr. Churchill to go to any interview which might be arrangedi. His personal courage has been demonstrated not only during this war but upon many a battlefield. As the leader of the great British empire and the present leader of the free peoples of the world we applaud his share in the meeting which took place at Casablanca.

Either now or at a later time I should like the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) to amplify his statement in certain respects. Was Canada kept informed? Was the government of Canada informed of the Casablanca meeting? Was the government of Canada informed from time to time of the proceedings which took place at Casablanca? Does the government of Canada concur in the objectives reached? I believe it would be of interest to the people of Canada to know just where our country stands in this matter.

Topic:   CASABLANCA CONFERENCE
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL AND PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, TOGETHER WITH CHIEFS OF STAFF, IN NORTH AFRICA
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to comment briefly upon the statement which the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) made to the house in regard to the great conference at Casablanca. It is a matter of deep satisfaction, shared I am sure by all of us, that the Prime Minister of Great Britain and the President of the United States were able to meet and discuss vital policies and questions of high importance affecting the prosecution of the war. As the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) has suggested, I hope the Prime Minister will on some future occasion, either in a public or a private session of this house, give us more information regarding this conference than we have yet received.

I am sorry that it was impossible, for reasons that we all understand, for Mr. Stalin, the great leader of Russia, to be present, and that General Chiang-Kai-Shek also was unable to be there. I have noted in writings and from certain conversations I have had during the

44561-327J

past few months that there is a growing misgiving on the part of certain of our great allies, arising from the opinion that this war is being looked upon too much as purely a partnership between the two great powers who have recently conferred. I hope that steps will be taken to ensure that representatives of the other great nations are enabled to meet in council with the President and the Prime Minister of Great Britain. I shall gcr one step further. The smaller nations have-an important contribution to make. Canada,. Australia, New Zealand, and the other nations-of the British commonwealth, as well as fighting Prance and the smaller allies, should be joined together in conference in an effort to bring this war to a successful conclusion, which can be achieved only by the complete overthrow of the nazi, fascist and Japanese aggressors. If such a conference were held in the-near future, it would do much to assist in the building up of a well-informed public opinion.

Topic:   CASABLANCA CONFERENCE
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL AND PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, TOGETHER WITH CHIEFS OF STAFF, IN NORTH AFRICA
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, referring to the matter which the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), has discussed, namely, the meeting of Prime Minister Churchill and President Roosevelt, I share the sincere feeling of satisfaction of hon. members of the house and the people of this country in the manifestation by these two men of such courage and originality, such interest and industry in the prosecution of the-titanic conflict in which we find ourselves engaged. I trust that they were able to achieve what they meant to achieve in the matter of expediting the conduct of the war. I trust, too, that while they were there they were able to make much progress in laying plans for the rehabilitation and reestablishment of mankind after the war is over. I have much greater anxiety, sir, concerning what is-to follow the peace than I have concerning the outcome of this struggle. I believe that we shall win this struggle, but I fear that far too little attention is being paid to the problem of winning the peace, and we shall watch-with deep interest the. developments that follow.

Topic:   CASABLANCA CONFERENCE
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL AND PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, TOGETHER WITH CHIEFS OF STAFF, IN NORTH AFRICA
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Mr. Speaker,,

may I say to my hon. friend the leader of the opposition as a reply to his question that it would be preferable, I think, to wait until the new session when there will be opportunity to discuss at length, if so desired, the conference at Casablanca, before I make any further statement with reference to it. But I should like to inform my hon. friend and the house immediately that I was duly informed of the intention of the Prime Minister and the President to meet in conference before the.

Tributes to Deceased Members

*conference itself took place, and I also received a summary of the proceedings of the conference before any announcement was made to the public. More than that I do not feel I should say at the moment.

I should like to add that when the matter comes up for discussion I hope to have at my left the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Ralston), who unfortunately met with an accident a few days ago but who I am happy to say is now rapidly recovering from its effects.

Topic:   CASABLANCA CONFERENCE
Subtopic:   MEETING OF PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL AND PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, TOGETHER WITH CHIEFS OF STAFF, IN NORTH AFRICA
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TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBERS

January 27, 1943