July 27, 1942

PRESS CENSORSHIP-CENSORSHIP OF SPEECHES IN HOUSE

NAT

Mr. CHURCH:

National Government

1. Who are the press censors in Ottawa and what experience have they for such work?

2. Who appointed them and what are their salaries and expenses?

3. Was the debate on the motion of Mr. Roy (Gaspe), on Thursday last, and the speeches of those who addressed the house on it, censored? If so, by whom, why, and under what authority, law statute or usage?

4. Whose remarks were so censored and for what reason?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PRESS CENSORSHIP-CENSORSHIP OF SPEECHES IN HOUSE
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LIB

Mr. THORSON: (Minister of National War Services)

Liberal

1. The two press censors for Canada, now known as chief censor of publications, are Fulgence Charpentier and Wilfrid Eggleston.

Fulgence Charpentier has had fifteen years' experience in newspaper work including ten years as member of the parliamentary press gallery, being successively secretary, vicepresident and president of said body in 192425-26. Mr. Charpentier holds a B.A. degree, served with the Canadian expeditionary forces in 1918, and studied law at Osgoode Hall. He was appointed joint press censor for Canada in February, 1940.

Wilfrid Eggleston has had fifteen years newspaper experience, including nine years as member of the parliamentary press gallery, being successively secretary, vice-president and president of that body in 1932-33-34. He was appointed press censor on November 1, 1939. He became deputy press censor for Canada on February 1, 1940, and was appointed joint press censor for Canada on May 1, 1940.

2. Appointed by order in council. Fulgence Charpentier receives no salary as censor, these duties being imposed upon him in addition'to those of editor of French Journals of the House of Commons; Wilfrid Eggleston receives $15 a day; both receive their actual and necessary travelling expenses when absent from Ottawa in the discharge of censorship duties.

3. No. Newspaper correspondents consulted the censors about the propriety of reporting certain remarks made in the debate referred to by Mr. Roy (Gaspe) but were advised that if these remarks were to be permitted by the House of Commons to appear in Hansard, the censors could not refuse to pass them for publication elsewhere.

4. Answered by No. 3.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PRESS CENSORSHIP-CENSORSHIP OF SPEECHES IN HOUSE
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PROPOSED B'URTHER DIVERSION OF WATER FROM LAKE MICHIGAN

NAT

Mr. CHURCH:

National Government

1. What action, if any, is the government taking regarding a bill which has been introduced in congress at Washington, by representative Sabath, for the further diversion of 5,000 second cubic feet of water of lake Michigan?

2. Have any representations been made by Canada to the rivers and harbors committee, or to the state department at Washington, on the subject, advising that such a diversion will by opposed by Canada?

3. Who is looking after Canada's interests in this matter?

4. What protection will be afforded to preserve the great lakes levels from further diversions in war-time?

5. Will an opportunity be afforded to discuss this matter before the adjournment of the house?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED B'URTHER DIVERSION OF WATER FROM LAKE MICHIGAN
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LIB

Mr. MACKENZIE KING: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

1. The government is watching the progress of the Bill but is taking no action at present.

2. No. If representations were made they would be made to the United States State Department and not to the rivers and harbors committee of the House of Representatives. Representative Sabath's bill is one of many that have been introduced in recent years in congress for the purpose of authorizing increased withdrawal of water from lake Michigan. The current bill has not reached a stage in congress at which representations by the Canadian government would appear to be necessary or desirable. The State department is aware that the Canadian government would oppose an increase in the diversion of water from lake Michigan. When a similar bill was being considered by the rivers and harbors committee in 1938, Secretary of State Hull wrote to the committee chairman on March 12, 1938 as follows:

I have no doubt whatever that passage of the bill would cause a very unfavourable reaction

Questions

in Canada and would lead to strong protests by the Canadian government. In the circumstances, I find it necessary in the interests of our relations with Canada, to convey an adverse opinion on the proposed bill.

3. The Department of External Affairs and the Canadian Legation in Washington.

4. Canada has a three-fold protection against increased diversion from lake Michigan: First, a United States Supreme Court decree which stands in the way of an increase; second, Canada's rights in international law; third, the common interest of Canada and the United States at all times and especially in war time in the preservation of the levels of the great lakes system.

5. In the government's view, it is neither necessary nor desirable to have a discussion of this matter before the adjournment.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED B'URTHER DIVERSION OF WATER FROM LAKE MICHIGAN
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GASOLINE RATIONING-MARITIME PROVINCES -BULK SHIPMENTS TO DEALERS

LIB

Gordon Timlin Purdy

Liberal

Mr. PURDY:

How much gasoline was shipped from bulk plants in New Brunswick to dealers in Quebec during, (a) May, (b) June, in the years 1940, 1941 and 1942?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GASOLINE RATIONING-MARITIME PROVINCES -BULK SHIPMENTS TO DEALERS
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

If I may answer this question it would be that the government has no information. It has not been the policy of the government to give quantities or movements of strategic materials.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GASOLINE RATIONING-MARITIME PROVINCES -BULK SHIPMENTS TO DEALERS
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LIB

Gordon Timlin Purdy

Liberal

Mr. PURDY:

What about the 40 per cent?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GASOLINE RATIONING-MARITIME PROVINCES -BULK SHIPMENTS TO DEALERS
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

I think the intention of the hon. member must have been to point out the differentiation in the rationing as between the two provinces. Quantities of gasoline have been moved in from one province to another and that of course creates confusion and discontent. I believe that was the intention of the hon. member.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GASOLINE RATIONING-MARITIME PROVINCES -BULK SHIPMENTS TO DEALERS
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

Although I do not know of any case, it is possible that quantities have been moved, and they may have been moved the other way. But I do not think we can produce these figures, nor do I think it desirable, if we do obtain them, to give them to the public.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GASOLINE RATIONING-MARITIME PROVINCES -BULK SHIPMENTS TO DEALERS
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SYNTHETIC RUBBER

NAT

Mr. HATFIELD:

National Government

1. What is the estimated cost of synthetic rubber per pound processed from petroleum products ?

2. What is the estimated cost of synthetic rubber per pound manufactured from alcohol produced from wheat and other grains at the Canadian market price?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SYNTHETIC RUBBER
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The process of making synthetic rubber is absolutely new, and has never been carried out on a large scale. Therefore estimates of cost of making the product in various ways are not available. Certain figures have been given in the United States, but they are very much at variance. I think it is quite out of the question to attempt to estimate the cost of production.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SYNTHETIC RUBBER
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POST-WAR DISTRIBUTION OF FOODS AND MATERIALS IN WAR RAVAGES COUNTRIES

LIB

Mr. REID:

Liberal

1. Has Canada participated in the discussions held between Sir Frederick Leith Ross, economic adviser to the British government and American officials regarding organizing supplies of wheat, dairy products, edible fats, coffee and other foods and materials for distribution in war ravaged countries after cessation of hostilities?

2. Is a wheat pool being established whereby 100 million bushels of wheat have been set aside for distribution after the war, (.a) if so, what countries have designated their willingness to contribute and, (b) what amount of wheat is being proposed as Canada's contribution to the pool?

3. Under what agency will this wheat be distributed and, will Canada be represented on any such administrative body?

4. Under what agency will all food supplies and materials other than wheat be distributed and, will Canada be represented on any such council set up for the distribution of dairy-products, edible fats and other materials?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POST-WAR DISTRIBUTION OF FOODS AND MATERIALS IN WAR RAVAGES COUNTRIES
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LIB

Mr. MACKENZIE KING: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

1. Sir Frederick Leith Ross will shortly be arriving in Ottawa. He will engage in discussions with Canadian government officials on matters concerning post-war relief.

2. It has been agreed to establish a relief pool of 100 million bushels of wheat.

(a) Canada., the United Kingdom and the United States have agreed to contribute to this pool. The governments of Argentina, Australia, Canada and the United States have agreed to make further contributions to the pool when required by the international wheat council in quantities to be determined by them in consultation with the council and on such basis as may be agreed among them.

(b) 25 million bushels.

3. The international wheat council shall be responsible for the administration of the relief pool and shall, wherever possible, arrange for distribution of relief wheat through such intergovernmental relief body as may be set up and given general responsibility for the distribution of relief. The international

Questions as Orders for Returns

wheat council consists of one or more delegates of each contracting government. Canada is a contracting government under the memorandum of agreement of June 27, 1942.

4. The nature and composition of such agency has not yet been determined, and is now the subject of inter-governmental consultation.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POST-WAR DISTRIBUTION OF FOODS AND MATERIALS IN WAR RAVAGES COUNTRIES
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INQUIRIES WITH RESPECT TO ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS

NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

In view

of the fact that we appear to be in the last week of the session, and that it would be desirable to have answers to the remaining questions on the order paper, may I ask that they be brought down before we adjourn?

Topic:   INQUIRIES WITH RESPECT TO ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
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July 27, 1942