July 25, 1942

SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

When I was home during the Easter recess I visited the office in Edmonton and was shown around by Mr. Barrie. He went to quite some trouble to show me the whole set-up, and I noticed that he was very crowded there. Perhaps if he had a little more room he would be able to get the bonus payments out with less delay.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

We have new quarters for him.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

I am glad to hear that. Then I was glad to hear the minister say that the rancher would be put in his proper place. I should like to see the board supplied with pinto ponies, cowboy hats and boots, in order that they might have a better appreciation of the difficulties of the ranchers. However, I am glad this matter is being straightened out.

I want to bring to the attention of the minister the case of a farmer who does some outside work. I have in mind a farmer who has a rural mail route for which he receives

Supply-Agriculture

$400 a year. This work requires parts of two days a week, but because he is receiving that $400 he is not allowed the bonus. I took this matter up with the Edmonton office but was not able to make any headway, and therefore I hope the minister will be able to take some action.

Then there is the case of a father and son working together. I have some cases of this kind in which the inspector has never obtained any information from the interested parties. Apparently he has gone to some of the neighbours and has absolutely refused to take any notice of the statements made by the father and son. If these matters are not cleared up in the near future, I will write the minister or Mr. Stevenson with regard to them. I understand that the dockage is supposed to be deducted from the grain, but I understand that the inspectors did not make this allowance in arriving at the average yield.

Then I should like to know who are the treasury board members in the west, and whether they are responsible for holding up the bonus payments. In several instances I have been told by Mr. Barrie that the claim had been passed and would be paid immediately. Then perhaps two months later I hear from the farmers that they have not received their cheques, and therefore it would appear that the treasury board is responsible for holding up these payments in a number of cases. I should like to see something done to have these payments made more promptly.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

It is not really the treasury board that has representatives out west; it is the comptroller of the treasury, who has representatives in Regina, Edmonton, and Winnipeg, who check these payments. The report which was read to us to-night by the hon. member for Qu'Appelle is one result of their activities.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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SC

Charles Edward Johnston

Social Credit

Mr. JOHNSTON (Bow River):

Can they hold up payments indefinitely after the board of review passes them?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

Yes; an auditor can hold up any payment until he is satisfied that it should be made.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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Item agreed to. Special. 31. To provide for wheat acreage reduction payments; for administration expenses in connection therewith, and for temporary appointments that may be required notwithstanding anything contained in the Civil Service Act, $5,225,000.


CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. WRIGHT:

Last year this vote amounted to $35,000,000. Is this the estimated total for this year?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

There will be a supplementary estimate brought in this year for about $22,950,000 to cover the actual payments.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

The saving in the wheat acreage reduction would almost pay that extra 20 cents a bushel. Therefore we shall not be much better off after all.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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CCF

George Hugh Castleden

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

I should like to ask a question with regard to the regulations. Presuming a man had a wheat acreage reduction of sixty acres but increased his summer-fallow by probably eighty acres and his coarse grains by twenty acres, I believe the means of determining what he would be entitled to was by pro-rating the increase in the summer-fallow?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

They did that last year, but there will be no pro-rating this year. We pro-rated last year because we averaged 1939 and 1940, but this year it _ is based on 1940 alone. We started out by saying that we were going to take an estimated acreage for 1940. When we did that we had to change our coarse grain acreage accordingly for the different years, and pro-rate that also, and the money had to be paid out on a pro-rated basis. That will not be necessary, in any event for the same reason, this year.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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CCF

George Hugh Castleden

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

Those regulations are not included in the regulations which were given the farmers in the first instance. When was that pro-rating adopted by the department, and on what authority?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

It is right in the regulations, where it is stated that in certain cases you could not take the year 1940, that you had to go back to 1939, add the two together and average them. It was because you had to do this that it was necessary to do the same thing with the coarse grains and summer-fallow, in order to keep your ratios correct, and then the payments had to be made on that basis.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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CCF

George Hugh Castleden

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

What will be the basis this year?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

It has nothing to do with 1939; it is only 1940, and therefore there will be no pro-rating.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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Item agreed to. Special. 32. To provide for assistance to encourage the improvement of cheese and cheese factories, $1,950,000.


LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

I should like to know the meaning of this estimate which has for its purpose the providing of assistance to encourage the improvement of cheese and

Supply-Agriculture

cheese factories. Rightly or wrongly, we think in British Columbia that we have been penalized for the benefit of the cheese industry in Ontario and Quebec. That may be incorrect, but it is our view, and I should like to know what the item in the estimates means.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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CON

Mark Cecil Senn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SENN:

And would the minister make a simple statement as to amount of bonus paid this year, the amount which goes to the cheese factories and what benefit the bonus has been? Has it improved the quality of the cheese?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

Yes, it has been improved from around 40 per cent to around 60 per cent. That is payable anywhere in Canada. If the cheese produced is 93 score, one cent is paid; and if it is 94 score, two cents is paid, either in British Columbia or anywhere else in Canada.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IRMA KERN ULRICH
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July 25, 1942