July 23, 1942

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES


(Translation) Third report of the joint committee of both houses on the printing of parliament.-Mr. Dupuis. Second report of special committee on honours and decorations-Mr. Macmillan.


POSTAL SERVICE

REGULATIONS RESPECTING PARCELS AND NEWSPAPERS MAILED FOR OVERSEAS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Pate Mulock (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. W. P. MULOCK (Postmaster General):

Yesterday the hon. member for Peterborough West (Mr. Fraser) made an inquiry in regard to change in regulations as to parcels to be sent overseas by mail. In regard to gift parcels for civilians in the United Kingdom, these parcels were first restricted in 1941, when, at the request of the British administration, a maximum weight of five pounds was imposed. Recently the British

administration advised that these regulations permitting the importation of gift parcels not exceeding five pounds gross weight are now applicable only if such parcels are not sent more freqently than once a month.

It will be noted that the orders restricting the sending of gift parcels were issued in order to conserve shipping space for more urgent supplies., There has been no change as regards the weight limit of parcels to our soldiers, which remains at eleven pounds.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS RESPECTING PARCELS AND NEWSPAPERS MAILED FOR OVERSEAS
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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

Are there any restrictions on newspapers?

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS RESPECTING PARCELS AND NEWSPAPERS MAILED FOR OVERSEAS
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LIB

William Pate Mulock (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. MULOCK:

In order to ensure that all available ocean transportation space is devoted to war essentials, it has been found necessary to take steps to reduce the volume of newspapers to civilians and to the troops in the United Kingdom and other transatlantic destinations, as well as to destinations in central and south America, Bermuda and the West Indies.

Effective August 10, complete newspapers or periodicals will not be accepted from the general public for transmission to such destinations. People who formerly sent newspapers or periodicals to destinations affected by this restriction are being requested to forward clippings of special interest instead. Publishers have agreed to cooperate, and the question of newspapers and periodicals mailed to subscribers at the destinations referred to is at present under consideration.

Further information in respect to this matter will be given through departmental publications, the press and radio.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS RESPECTING PARCELS AND NEWSPAPERS MAILED FOR OVERSEAS
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APPOINTMENT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE UNDER WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD


On the orders of the day:


CON

Mark Cecil Senn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. M. C. SENN (Haldimand):

I wish to ask a question of the Minister of Finance. A news item over the radio yesterday stated that the wartime prices and trade board had appointed an advisory committee to deal with the beef situation. Will the minister state whether that is correct, and also see that the names are brought down at the earliest possible day? The estimates for agriculture will be up in the course of a day or two.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE UNDER WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

I will get that information and present it on the orders of the day to-morrow.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Could the minister get it for this afternoon? Agriculture may be up soon.

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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

I will try.

Brunelle

Cote

Picard

Halle

Mobilization Act-Division

Columbia (Mr. Mayhew) was paired with the hon. member for Jacques Cartier (Mr. Marier). Had the hou. member for Jacques Cartier voted he would have voted for the amendment.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE UNDER WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD
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LIB

Pierre Gauthier

Liberal

Mr. GAUTHIER:

The hon. member for Quebec West and South (Mr. Parent) was paired with the hon. member for Cochrane (Mr. Bradette). Had he voted he would have voted for the amendment.

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LIB

Elie-Oscar Bertrand

Liberal

Mr. BERTRAND (Prescott):

I was paired with the hon. member for Springfield (Mr. Turner). Had I voted I would have voted for the amendment.

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LIB

Hervé-Edgar Brunelle

Liberal

Mr. BRUNELLE (Translation):

I was

paired with the hon. member for Portage la Prairie (Mr. Leader). Had I voted I would have voted for the amendment.

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LIB

Georges Parent (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The question is on the main motion. May I assume that all members are here and ready to take the vote?

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CON

Louis Côté

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. COTE:

I was paired with the hon. member for Athabaska (Mr. Dechene). Had I voted I would have voted for the amendment.

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LIB

Eugène Durocher

Liberal

Mr. DUROCHER:

I am authorized to say that the hon. member for Victoria, British

Mobilization Act-Mr. Hansell

changed since the beginning of the war I do not understand that language. When he talks in that language he can mean only one thing, that you might just as well win the war ten years from now as win it now.

That is an entirely wrong attitude to take. I therefore do not rise in defence of the stand that this group has taken ever since the war began. We will contend for that stand, for it is the only stand that can be taken in time of war.

As I listened to the speeches to-day I could not help thinking that in this chamber, which has sometimes been called the highest court in the land, the game of politics is now being played. I declare that this issue of conscription has been the political football of this country ever since the war commenced, notwithstanding anything that anyone can say to the contrary. It was so in the election of 1940; it was so in the plebiscite, and it is so in this debate. Politics, politics, politics! When somebody talks politics the house applauds; when anyone talks regular basic common sense no notice is taken of it, or else we are incapable of knowing what it means. As I listened to the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson), I did not hear all his speech, and as I listened to the Prime Minister, it took me back to my school days and I felt like saying, "Now boys, boys, boys, do not fight like that."

What is the issue? To my mind the issue is to put into practice now what the people said should ibe put into practice when they put a little X mark opposite that word "yes". That was the vote of the people. That was the voice of democracy. When the people speak with a voice as loud as they did that day that should end all debate. When the people speak that should be the last word. But what have we seen displayed in this house? I think there have been nearly one hundred speeches made in an attempt to explain what the little X mark meant after the word "yes". The voice of the people expresses the will of the people, and the will of the people is supreme. When they voted "yes" that was the "go" sign for the government to put all they had into this war. That needs no explanation; it needs no debate. Then what have we been talking about? We have simply been vying with one another in making it a political issue. We of this group refuse and have refused to play politics. If it had not been for the vote about to be taken, and all other groups having spoken, we would have remained silent. We refuse to play politics in time of war.

There is one thing that bothers me. I have not been able to understand what the

Prime Minister means when he talks of coming back to parliament for this vote of confidence. I am sorry I have to take this attitude, but almost every time the Prime Minister speaks I have to regard it as having some sort of political significance. Perhaps I am not right in that; I hope I am not too suspicious. I am not an old hand in parliament; I have been here only since 1935, but somehow or another-I cannot explain why-when some proposal is made by the Prime Minister I wonder what political dodge he is up to. He now proposes to come to parliament to ask for a vote of confidence. What does that mean? Almost everything we vote on here is a vote of confidence or no confidence, depending upon the way the vote goesj

There is something else which I do not understand, which I cannot think my way through, for I like to be as logical as I can. The Prime Minister says, "We will come for a vote of confidence in this administration." Well, you know, if I were certain that this was a parliament of the people I could believe in the veracity of his action in that regard; but this parliament, I maintain, is no longer a parliament of the people, whatever we may say about it. This is a parliament of parties; we may as well make up our minds to that at ouce. When the Prime Minister comes to this parliament for a vote of confidence, I think I know what is going to happen. The whips are going to begin to crack, to whip members into line, and when the vote is taken we know how it will go. I fail to see where that is a vote of confidence. To make my illustration clear, let us suppose that the three opposition groups in this house refuse to vote confidence, but that the large Liberal majority votes confidence. Will the Prime Minister say that is a vote of confidence by parliament?

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE UNDER WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD
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July 23, 1942