July 1, 1942

STANDING ORDERS


Third report of standing committee on standing orders.-Mr. Golding.


THE CANADIAN CONFEDERATION

SEVENTY-FIFTH NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY-CANADA AND THE WAR-ARMY WEEK

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, this being the 1st of July, and the seventy-fifth anniversary of confederation, I should like to give expression to some of the thoughts I believe will be in the minds of hon. members of this house. With the permission of the house I should like to make a brief statement.

The Canadian Confederation

This day, the seventy-fifth anniversary of Canadian confederation, falls at a time when Canada is employing the nation's energy and resources against an enemy who would destroy our very existence as a free people. At such a time, when the citizens of Canada are engaged upon one all-absorbing task, elaborate ceremonies would be out of place even in celebrating so splendid an achievement as confederation represents. We may, however, rightly pause on this anniversary, gratefully to reflect on the vision and the wisdom which enabled the fathers of confederation to bring our nation into being.

We are freely and fully associated with the other free peoples of the world in a death struggle, with an enemy seeking to remove from the earth the heritage of freedom on which our institutions are founded. A few days ago, for the first time since confederation, Canadian soil was attacked.

The fathers of confederation built this nation on a foundation of human freedom, of self-government, of religious liberty, of racial equality, and of deep and abiding attachment to a common homeland. These are the sources of the harmony and mutual understanding among our people which, in turn, is the essence of our national strength, alike in war and peace.

Our enemies seek, everywhere, to replace freedom by slavery, self-government by tyranny, religious liberty and racial equality by the pagan conception of the master race; they seek to make of the homelands of all free peoples, colonies of slaves in which the sanctity of home and family will be sacrificed to the lust and greed of the conqueror.

To meet this threat to Christian civilization, to national existence, to homes and families, Canada is mobilizing all her resources of skill and strength, of brains and energy, of farm and forest, of mine and factory, of wealth and manpower. Our fighting forces, with those of our allies, are on many shores and many seas, and in the skies over many countries, battling to make sure that victory is won before war comes to Canadian soil. Along the coasts of Canada, our soldiers stand on watchful guard. Our coastal waters are ceaselessly patrolled by vessels of the Canadian navy and planes of the Canadian air force. In all the centres of industry, men and women are labouring to make huge stores of weapons and munitions. From fields and mines and forests workers are extracting the essential supplies of war.

It is particularly fitting that the celebration of our seventy-fifth national anniversary should coincide with army week in Canada. Our national pride has deepened with the

knowledge of Canada's army guarding the heart of the empire, protecting the world's greatest citadel of freedom, and prepared for action in any place, at any time. We have all been profoundly stirred by the exploits of Canadian airmen in every theatre of war; Ceylon, Cologne, Essen, Emden, now Bremen, are a witness to their magnificent daring, and to their important role. We know how great and how vital has been the work of our navy. We have been told that Canadian machines and munitions, Canadian food and Canadian money were essential to keep Britain fighting in the dark days of 1940 and 1941. But our Canadian army, because it has seen little fighting, has not thus far received its fair share of credit. This week, throughout all Canada, the Canadian people are being given a special opportunity to restore the balance by showing their appreciation of the Canadians in battle dress.

May I pause to recall the record. The first contingent of the Canadian army landed in Britain on December 17, 1939. But for the collapse of France, the first division would have come to grips with the enemy in the summer of 1940. All through that dark summer they stood waiting for the expected invasion. They were joined during that time by the second division, and at Christmas of 1940 the Canadian corps was formed. In 1941, a third infantry division, an armoured division, an army tank brigade, and thousands upon thousands of specialized troops and reinforcements were added to their numbers.

This year more units and reinforcements have crossed the sea, and others will follow. The Canadian corps in Britain has become a highly trained, hard-hitting, mobile Canadian army. Mr. Churchill has told us what the Canadian army has meant to him and to the people of Britain. Let me repeat what he said last September:

There they stand, and there they have stood through the whole of the critical period of the last fifteen months at the very point where they would be the first to be hurled into a counter-stroke against an invader. No greater service can be rendered to this country, no more important military duty can be performed by any troops in all the allies.

There has been no glamour; there have been no great headlines. We in Canada, have not realized, as fully as the people of Britain, how greatly our army has contributed and continues to contribute to the security of the bridge-head which separates the tyrant of Europe from the western hemisphere, and which bridge-head is also our own surest defence.

I doubt, too, if we have given the credit which is their due to the men in battle dress

The Canadian Confederation

who have stood in ceaseless vigil at the lonely outposts of our own country. When the balance sheet of war is struck, we shall do well never to forget the long dreary months of dull, but vital routine which the army has performed with little notice, and no complaint, on our coasts, and in vulnerable areas in Canada, in Newfoundland and Labrador, and on the islands of the Atlantic.

The Canadian army is not an instrument built only to resist attack. It was planned, it has been organized, and is trained as a highly mechanized and armoured striking force. The day is coming-it may be close at hand- when it will have an honoured place in the van of attack. No Canadian doubts that when that day comes, our army will do its full part-and a glorious part-in helping to defeat and to destroy the military might of an enemy whose design and ambition is to conquer the whole free world. Canada's army is strong; it is united by a common purpose. It' is the duty of all Canadian citizens to be no less strong, no less united by a common purpose. On this seventy-fifth anniversary of confederation the need is greater than ever before in our history, to let nothing divide us as a people, to compose our differences, and to throw all our energies into the task of saving our country, and helping to save the freedom of the world. If we would be worthy of our past, and the sacrifices of the past; if we would be worthy of the many brave sons of Canada who, in the present war, have given their all, and of the half million young Canadians who have offered, if need be, to die for their country, it is our supreme duty, while striving for victory, to preserve for those who may survive the frightful vicissitudes of war, and for future generations, a free and a united Canada.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN CONFEDERATION
Subtopic:   SEVENTY-FIFTH NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY-CANADA AND THE WAR-ARMY WEEK
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure that

we all join in the expressions of noble sentiments which have just fallen from the lips of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King). I desire to associate myself and the party I represent in this house, with what he has said. In less critical times, the seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of this dominion would probably be celebrated with a fitting degree of pomp and ceremony; but in the midst of the gigantic struggle in which we are engaged, we do the greatest honour to our nation if we pause from our labours long" enough only to rededicate ourselves to the herculean task of preserving those ideals and principles which the fathers of our nation sought to establish upon enduring foundations on the northern half of this continent.

We do well to pause, on the occasion of the commemoration of the seventy-fifth anniversary of confederation, and recall with pride and gratitude the example and accomplishment of those great men who founded the Canadian nation. The genius and vision of Sir John A. Macdonald, the patience and tolerance of Sir Georges Etienne Cartier, and the helpful cooperation of Brown, Tupper, Tilley, and the other fathers, resulted, as Sir John forecast it would, in the development of "a friendly nation, a powerful people to stand by Britain in north America in peace or in war." At this juncture of our history, the inspiring words spoken by Sir John in 1861 are as pertinent and important as when he uttered them more than eighty years ago. His message, like all eternal truth, retains its significance for each succeeding generation. In stressing the importance of the preservation of union between Upper and Lower Canada, Sir John used these words:

If I had any influence over the minds of the people of Canada, any power over their intellect, I would leave them this legacy: "Whatever you do, adhere to the union-we are a great country, and shall become one of the greatest in the universe if we preserve it; we shall sink into insignificance and adversity if we suffer it to be broken." God and nature have made the two Canadas one

let no factious men be allowed to put them asunder.

In this, democracy's hour of trial, it is, as I see it, the duty of each and every Canadian to keep before him those inspiring words. If democracy is to survive, the freedom and liberties for which the fathers of confederation laboured long and well must be preserved. The preservation of those liberties depends and will be determined by the vigour and the strength of the united effort of each of the allied nations.

It is fitting that when we are celebrating the seventy-fifth anniversary of confederation we should also have the opportunity, through army week, of paying tribute to those upon whom rests, with the navy and the air force, the responsibility for the preservation of our nation. On this hill, this afternoon, in front of these buildings, is being demonstrated the gallantry, the determination, the enthusiasm, the will to victory, of Canada's youth. The hearts of those of us who must serve in more mundane fashion go out to these men. So far, the task of the Canadian army has been one rather of preparation and training than of action, but there is no doubt when the great offensive comes, without which victory cannot be achieved, the Canadian army will not only live up to the high traditions of the past but create a new and glorious record for our future history. The Canadian army will prove, as General McNaughton has said: "A dagger

The Canadian Confederation

pointed at the heart of Berlin." We all hope that the time is not far distant when that dagger may be plunged at its objective.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN CONFEDERATION
Subtopic:   SEVENTY-FIFTH NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY-CANADA AND THE WAR-ARMY WEEK
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, I was unaware of the fact that any recognition was to be given in the house this afternoon to the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Canadian Confederation, but I think it is quite proper that it should be done. A little less than one hour ago I was joining, through the magic of radio, in a service being held in Westminster Abbey. The Archbishop of Canterbury preached the sermon; the High Commissioner for Canada read a brief scriptural lesson, and representatives of many nations took part in the service. I listened to the tribute paid to this country by the archbishop, and to his expression of deep conviction that the British commonwealth of nations as it is to-day may be the forerunner of a development in the future of a free association of all nations all equal; none subservient ' to the other. As he said this afternoon, the British empire is no longer an empire in the old sense, but a new form of association, typifying something far greater and far better than any ancient empire ever was.

This afternoon we are paying a tribute not only to those who founded this dominion but also to the young men who are standing guard along our coasts and across the seas. In my opinion the greatest tribute we can pay, both to our forefathers and to those who to-day are bearing the brunt of battle, is to determine in this chamber, first, what shall be done now to make our contribution to a great cause the most effective that we can make, and, second, how best we may lay now the foundations in this country to the end that the men who are serving across the seas may return to a land in which they may live in security and in peace; in which they may build for themselves and for coming generations something better than we or they have ever known. If on this occasion I might leave one thought with the house, and particularly with the government, it would be this: Let the government come before this house without any further delay and tell us exactly what the situation is, and thus share with the members of the House of Commons, representing the people of Canada, the entire responsibility for all that we may have to do to ensure our maximum contribution to the cause of world freedom and universal peace.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN CONFEDERATION
Subtopic:   SEVENTY-FIFTH NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY-CANADA AND THE WAR-ARMY WEEK
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, the members of the group that I have the honour of leading, and the great body of

people whom we represent in this chamber, will be happy to join with those who have expressed the noble and lofty sentiments to which we have just- listened. We love Canada, we love the British empire, the British commonwealth of nations, or association of nations, or whatever people choose to call it-that great body of British peoples and associated peoples who at this critical time are fighting for their existence as a unit and the right to continue to endeavour to lead the world.

I was thinking while the others were speaking how greatly disappointed the fathers of confederation must feel as they look down upon Canada from their high places and reflect upon how much unhappiness there is and has been in our country during the last twenty years. I was thinking that the finest resolution we could make here now, all of us together, would be that to the extent to which we are called upon so to do, we should consecrate our lives to the high task of making this nation what the fathers of confederation intended it should be-a great union of majestic states called provinces, each of which, while daughter in her mother's house, is mistress in her own; a union of states in which all enjoy equal opportunities. There is no reason why there should not be in Canada the greatest happiness. There is no reason why this nation should not in every sense become one of the greatest nations in the world. It is our task now to dedicate ourselves to the accomplishment of that worthy end, so that the people of all Canada Shall have justice, prosperity, peace and joy, and shall be foremost in the making of that brighter and better world to the threshold of which the great Creator has manifestly led us. This, sir, would be my sentiment on this occasion.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN CONFEDERATION
Subtopic:   SEVENTY-FIFTH NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY-CANADA AND THE WAR-ARMY WEEK
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LIB

Pierre-Joseph-Arthur Cardin

Liberal

Hon. P. J. A. CARDIN (Richelieu-Vercheres):

Mr. Speaker, as the rules of this house have already been broken on this seventy-fifth anniversary of confederation, I would ask your indulgence and that of hon. members while I express a few thoughts, in the French language.

(Translation) Mr. Speaker, as a representative from the province of Quebec, I think it only appropriate to add my humble tribute to those you have already heard celebrating the seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of our Canadian confederation. I do so with all my strength of heart and mind because I am one of those who have believed in our Canadian confederation, in the opportuneness of its establishment and in the benefits to be derived therefrom by our citizens of all races and creeds. I rejoice with those who had the advantage of speaking earlier this afternoon in the remarkable success already achieved with regard to the development of our Canadian nation.

The Canadian Confederation

I am well content with the progress made and I sincerely hope that the results obtained to date will not be endangered by the differences of opinion and thought which [DOT] are liable to divide public opinion.

Let no one forget, Mr. Speaker that the Canadian confederation does not represent the union of the majority with a minority, but rather the union on an equal footing of the two main racial groups in Canada. At the time of confederation, the main problem was that of ensuring equal rights to all citizens, whatever their mentality or language.

Let us never forget this great truth: There is no minority, there is no majority in this country. There are only brothers joined together by a common agreement for the good of the entire community; not for the advantage of a certain class or group but for the greater good of all Canadian citizens.

There have occurred in the past, Mr. Speaker, just as there occur to-day, differences of opinion and thought on certain matters which may stir up public opinion. Human institutions can never command complete unanimity of opinion in every field. There are always different views held on every question. Despite all the good faith in the world, humanity must remain divided. Such division dates from the very beginning of time and will endure till the end. The human mind is not one; it divides itself into various points of view and there are no questions on which we may really achieve complete unanimity of thought and feeling. Such an achievement would be contrary to human nature. It would be superhuman.

It even appears necessary that these differences of opinion, these conflicts of thought should exist if only as a source of that light by which nations as well as individuals are guided.

I repeat that I share the views already expressed and I hope that now as in the future peace and harmony will continue to distinguish our mutual relations on this Canadian soil. If our opinions should differ on certain points, if we should1 not agree on the manner and means of reaching a certain goal, this does not mean that we have opposite aims. It does not mean that we from the province of Quebec do not share the same feelings, the same aspirations, the same desires, the same love of Canada that inspires those who belong to the majority.

On this anniversary day, I pray that there may come about a better understanding between all Canadian citizens and that silence be imposed on those who, in this house and

country appear inclined to sow disunity and misunderstanding which might destroy the master work of our Canadian confederation.

Let us try to understand each other, to get along better together. Granted this understanding, there is no doubt that Canada can become a great nation, without any of her different racial groups being forced to abandon their ties with the past, their traditions, in a word all that has made them great in the past and which they hold dear.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN CONFEDERATION
Subtopic:   SEVENTY-FIFTH NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY-CANADA AND THE WAR-ARMY WEEK
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


CANADIAN NATIONAL HOTELS-WAGES OF TRADESMEN

LIB

Mr. ISNOR:

Liberal

1. What were the rates of pay in effect as at May 1, 1942, at the Canadian National hotels at Ottawa, Halifax, Charlottetown, Port Arthur, Winnipeg, Brandon, Saskatoon, Edmonton and Vancouver, of the following trades, (a) carpenters, (b) plumbers, (c) pipefitters, (d) electricians, (e) painters, (f) engineers, (g) assistant engineers?

2. Have any rates been increased since the 1st May, 1942? If so, state which, and by what amounts?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL HOTELS-WAGES OF TRADESMEN
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LIB

Mr. MICHAUD: (Minister of Public Works; Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

1. The management of Canadian National Railways state that it is not in the interest of the national lines to publicize the information called for, and suggest that the hon. member get in touch with Mr. R. Somerville, general manager of Canadian National chain of hotels, whose office is located in the Chateau Laurier at Ottawa, who will be very glad to confer with him and give him such information as may be possible, having regard to the interests of the railway and its hotel system.

2. No.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL HOTELS-WAGES OF TRADESMEN
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RENTAL OF DERRICKS FROM DUFFERIN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

NAT

Mr. FRASER (Peterborough West):

National Government

1. Does the Dufferin shipyards rent two derricks from the Dufferin Construction Company?

2. If so, what is the rental charge?

3. Are these derricks in first class condition?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RENTAL OF DERRICKS FROM DUFFERIN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Public Works; Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

1 and 2. No. However, Toronto Shipbuilding Company Limited (formerly Dufferin Shipbuilding Company Limited) does rent from Dufferin Paving & Crushed Stone Limited (a subsidiary of Dufferin Construction Company Limited) the following crawler cranes at the following rentals:

Questions

No. of units Crane No. Rating Make1 18 25 ton Koehring1 10 20 ton Dominion1 1 10 ton Koehring1 11 7i ton Koehring1 14 7\ ton Erie

Monthly rental

Model Type First shift Second shift601 Gasoline $750 00 $375 00Diesel 935 00 470 00301 Gasoline 565 00 285 002-A Gasoline 510 00 255 00Gasoline 510 00 255 00

The full first shift rental is payable each month; the second shift rental is paid at one twenty-sixth of the rental shown for each day the crane is operated on the second shift.

It is the intention to retain the above equipment only pending delivery of new cranes now on order, and in fact on June 5, 1942, notice of intention to release the "Erie" crane, crane No. 14, was given and this crane will be returned to its owners on July 3, 1942.

3. All the above equipment is kept in good operating condition.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RENTAL OF DERRICKS FROM DUFFERIN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
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MILITARY SERVICE-MARRIED MEN SEPARATED FROM OR NOT SUPPORTING THEIR WIVES

LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

Are married men of military age, separated or not supporting their wives, subject to call on the draft?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MILITARY SERVICE-MARRIED MEN SEPARATED FROM OR NOT SUPPORTING THEIR WIVES
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LIB

Joseph Thorarinn Thorson (Minister of National War Services)

Liberal

Mr. THORSON:

Men married prior to July 15, 1940, are not subject to the proclamation now in force calling out men for military training under the national war services regulations.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MILITARY SERVICE-MARRIED MEN SEPARATED FROM OR NOT SUPPORTING THEIR WIVES
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July 1, 1942