June 17, 1942

CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

Let the hon. member go back to his own party.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

I am speaking about the hon. member's party now.

In my opinion that is not a very good record either-by a long shot. In 1937, 1938 and 1939 we fought here for national defence. Our Prime Minister had the foresight to see what was developing on the European horizon. He was thinking of the safety and security of Canada, and the development of national defence. He could see the dangerous war clouds rising on the European horizon. Were there any greater opponents to increases in expenditures for national defence than hon. members of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation?

In my own constituency in 1939 they held an organization meeting, and they asked tjiese questions: "Whom is the Liberal party going to fight? Whom is Canada going to fight? Are they going to fight Japan? Surely they do not intend to fight Germany?" It just happened that they were close to Moosonee, and they said they were "probably going to fight the Eskimos." Those are the things they were trying to say in those days. Let us keep the record straight. The condition of the world was not due to the Tory party in Great Britain; it was not due to any party. It was due to the state of mind of civilized people, of the democracies-nothing more or less than that. They all wished for and wanted peace. This is no place to try to besmirch the reputation of the British people or their government.

And now a word about social credit. They always have a wonderful bargain counter, but there is only one article on it, and that is social credit. They will cooperate with anyone or with anybody-not the New Democracy, of course, because they threw that name away a few days ago. I have nothing to say against the Social Credit party or its leader.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

Would the hon. member permit a question?

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Yes.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Sit down

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

I have never refused a question from anyone in the house. If hon.

members will not permit me the same privilege, then I say shame on them. The hon. member for Cochrane has just said that we had thrown away the New Democracy name. That is absolutely incorrect.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

I said-

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

The ACTING SPEAKER (Mr. Martin):

The hon. gentleman has asked permission to put a question and the hon. gentleman who has the floor has consented. Will the hon. member put his question?

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

I withdraw anything I said against New Democracy. For five or-six years these people in Alberta have tried out their theories. However, we will leave that aside for the moment. What puzzles me is that the leader of this party is in favour of female civil servants in his province going out and buying farms which cost $4,000 to $5,000 in some cases, and then bringing in chinchillas, mink and other fur-bearing animals. He said that to do this would increase our foreign exchange. Time after time the hon. member for Acadia (Mr. Quelch) has risen in his place to attack the gold mining industry in my section of the country and apparently he wants to destroy it. This industry produces $200,000,000 of new wealth a year, which helps to maintain the ratio of the Canadian dollar to the United States currency. What is the sense in making such an attack? Nearly

500,000 Canadians, miners, farmers and workers, are fruitfully employed in producing a commodity which has a ready market in the United States.

I want to speak now on national unity.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

It would be out of order.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Is the hon. member against national unity? I seldom interrupt the hon. gentleman when he is speaking. I have never doubted his sincerity, and I ask him to treat me in the same way.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

A little while ago the hon. gentleman said that what we were saying-

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

-was said just to poison the minds of the people.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

I was referring to the policies of his party, not to the hon. member individually.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

Our party is sincere; we are not poisoning the minds of the people.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

I will say yes definitely. The hon. member has said worse things at times about the Liberal party.

Mobilization Act-Mr. Bradette

We have just heard two hon. members from the province of Quebec. They represent an . important section of the country that voted a definite "no", but I must tell them that there are other sections of the country where the Canadian people voted a definite "yes". If the extremists of our country can find a common ground then it will be possible to maintain Canadian unity. I believe it was last session that a member on the Conservative side stated that the majority should not be governed by the minority. I never heard a more sinister statement made, because I never knew that minorities could govern majorities.

In the British empire we have a marvellous spectacle of a small British minority, as far as the British people are concerned, doing one of the finest jobs the world has ever known. This result has been achieved by their endeavouring to understand every section of that empire. Only a few days ago one Hindu leader made a statement that three out of four people in the British empire are Hindus. The fact that that little island has become one of the great institutions of the world is due to its ability to listen to the problems of the people, to understand and respect the aspirations of all its people. Here in Canada we have the descendants of two great races, the French and the English, as well as the descendants of other European races, living together and working to make a greater prosperity and a happier Canada. It was my good fortune to be born and raised in Quebec. That is my second country within my country. When I go back to the French-speaking part of Canada it is like making a pilgrimage. However, I am living now in Ontario and I must give this message to you. To you in Quebec who are an integral part in our national life, to you who have done so well in your own province, remember that the Laurentian mountains are not the border of your country. The whole of Canada belongs to you, to the French-speaking Canadians as well as to the English-speaking Canadians, indeed, as well as to all Canadians.

If we can move forward, if we can eliminate the rough spots in this time of crisis, then there is no reason to doubt the future of this country. But to run roughshod over the minorities is un-Canadian and un-British. As a loyal son of British institutions and of Canada, I believe it is my duty to repeat what has been said so well by previous speakers and by several members of the cabinet. We are not satisfied with what has been done in our war effort, we want it to be accentuated still more. This effort should not meet with derision, and Canadian unity must be maintained at all times. Would any

Canadian have the audacity to say that they are not loyal to their institutions in south Africa because their mobilization act states definitely that there will be no service required outside the African continent? No one will dare say that they are not loyal or are not ready to fight for Christianity or civilization.

Australia has been mentioned time and time again. Her sons are fighting in every section of the civilized world, but I do not think any one will dare criticize them because they have not passed legislation for service overseas. We have many things to learn from the present conflict. Anyone who has watched events in Burma during the last three months must come to the conclusion that certain racial and social problems must be dealt with.

To refer again to the Indian empire, only a few weeks ago Great Britain found it possible to send one of her greatest statesmen, a progressive in every sense of the word, to that country to attempt to deal with questions that had arisen. Sir Stafford Cripps had a mandate from his own government, and he stayed on the ground in an effort to comprehend the aspirations of every section of the population of that great Indian empire. I well remember when a newspaperman on the Ottawa Journal went to England last year to attend a press conference. When he came home he wrote a series of very fine articles. It was his good fortune, probably because his ancestors came from Ireland, to have had a personal interview with the Prime Minister of Eire.

This newspaperman wrote a series of articles in which he did not beg, because there was no need to beg, but in which he asked the Canadian people to try to comprehend the position of Eire, to realize what she had done so far and what could be expected of her. It was not necessary that those articles should be read in the province of Quebec, or, for that matter, anywhere else in Canada. So far as I know, there has not been a single adverse comment in the province of Quebec over the attitude of Eire in this war. If it is possible to analyse coolly the actions of any peoples of the British empire, surely we the Canadian people, who have had the good fortune to live together for so many years, should try to understand each other and achieve national unity in a time of crisis. We do not want indulgence; we do not want mercy. All we ask is that every section of our population take the trouble to try to understand the mentality of the Canadian people and its different racial groups.

I listened attentively last evening to the masterly address of the Minister of Justice (Mr. St. Laurent). He spoke as a true Cana-

Mobilization Act-Mr. Bradette

dian and a true statesman. His appeal was addressed to reason. A previous speaker has referred to Doctor Shields, and although we may have one or two men of that type in the province of Quebec also, who would try to arouse one section of the population against the other, I have been highly elated at the general feeling of good understanding there is between our people. It shows how easy it is for us to cooperate harmoniously in a common cause when only we try to understand each other.

I want to speak now on the plebiscite. For three solid weeks I spent all of my time in my constituency, working in cooperation with the Canadian Legion and with various political organizations. I worked almost day and' night to get a "yes" vote in my con-stitency, and I received the smallest "yes" majority given in any riding in Canada. It was almost next to "no". But I am proud of my work and of that "yes" majority, and I believe that if I had had more time at my disposal the majority would have been much greater. I was appealing to a section of the country in which we have no war industries of any kind but one in which we have always gone over the top with a vengeance in raising money for war activities, one in which I can say, without boasting, there have been the largest enlistments in proportion to population of any riding in Canada. Our young Canadians in that part of the country, regardless of their racial origin, have joined the colours of their own accord-Finnish, Polish, Russian, French speaking, English speaking, and so on. For them all there was only one common cause. Indeed at the present time our supply of man-power is so sh ->rt because of the great numbers who have enlisted, and I say that with pride, that our industries are hampered.

I have here two issues of the Daily Press of Timmins, Ontario, of the 11th and 12th of this month, and each contains a picture of the latest recruits to join the armed forces from that part of the country. I should like to read their names. The first picture shows one of the largest groups to be dispatched to headquarters in Toronto within the last month, and in the front row, left to right, are: Fernand Carriere, Harvey Kenty, Jean Belisle, Elmo Pissonnette, George Miller and Hector Madon. In the back row, left to right, are: Private J. P. McFarlane, member of the local recruiting staff, Charles Laahanem, Mansfield Francis, Alexander Gauthier, John Daly and Patrice Mone. Another recruit who had left the night before, Marcel Tichette, was not present for the picture.

In the other picture, shown in the front row, left to right, are: Reginald Forster,

James Rusenstrom, Howard Tomlinson and Augustin Langlois. In the back row, left to right, are: Sapper Hines, member of the

recruiting staff, Raoul Nadon and Private Clouthier, Canadian Provost Corps, who acted as an escort on the trip to Toronto. Edward Lynch also left with this group but was not present for the picture.

Hon. members will see from those names a representative cross-section of our people. The recruiting generally represents every section of northern Ontario. North Bay, Sudbury, Kapuskasing, Timmins, Kirkland Lake -everywhere there is the same answer to the call of duty, regardless of race or creed. They enlist freely as young Canadians, ready to make the sacrifice so that we may be victorious. In that section of the country it has been possible to create a huge melting pot in which Canadian aspirations are given full sway, and if that be possible in one part of the country, it is possible elsewhere in Canada.

Strong and injudicious statements were made by some speakers in the plebiscite campaign. One gentleman in addressing a meeting said that if we had had conscription in the fall of 1939, the war would be over by now. Such a statement did not help our cause in any way, shape or form. At another meeting a speaker said that Canada should have one million men overseas. These sweeping, far-fetched statements were no help to me in getting out a "yes" vote. But I want to say that our people, when they voted "yes" in my section of the country, were not voting for conscription. Following the lead of the Prime Minister, the leader of the opposition and the leader of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation party, I emphasized the importance-I used the very words of the Prime Minister-of a balanced war effort, the necessity for which has been so well pointed out by the cabinet ministers who have spoken in this debate. I also said that so far as I personally was concerned I would never take the responsibility upon my own weak shoulders of sending one single Canadian soldier over to Europe unless he was completely equipped with all the weapons that modern warfare demands. Nor would I take the responsibility of putting men in uniform if I believed that it would diminish the production of vital supplies that are sorely needed at the present time by dear old Great Britain. I also made it very clear that this was not just a war of infantry, but a balanced war, and my people understood.

But, and I say this in no spirit of criticism, I want no more Hong Kong. I want our young Canadians who have enlisted for over-

Questions

seas service anywhere in the world to be, as General McNaughton so well said, a real striking force, thoroughly equipped with modern weapons, so that, as was so well expressed by the Minister of National War Services this afternoon, human life may be spared as much as possible.

To-day is to me, as it is to every Canadian, a very sad anniversary indeed. It is the second anniversary of the defeat of my old motherland, France. But mind you, Mr. Speaker, it was not lack of man-power that destroyed France. It was not lack of courage, or lack of valour. It was purely and simply a lack of modern equipment-of tanks, of planes, of guns. Wherever we have met the enemy on equal terms in the matter of equipment, we have beaten him. I would not think for a single moment of sending human flesh, unprotected, against a German panzer division. I believe that our soldiers should have the very best in weapons, in food and clothing, and in equipment generally. I should be remiss in my duty if I urged anything less.

On motion of Mr. Bradette the debate was adjourned.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
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At six o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order. Thursday, June 18, 1942


June 17, 1942