June 17, 1942

CONDITIONS WITH RESPECT TO HOUSEHOLD


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Mr. Speaker, I promised to make a statement to-day on the oil situation, and I will do so now.

On May 20, as reported in Hansard, page 2845, in reply to a question by the hon. member for Waterloo South (Mr. Homuth) I stated that no fuel oil would be available for heating in private residences during the coming winter. On the following day I amplified this statement somewhat, by indicating that every effort would be made to provide fuel oil for heating purposes in private homes where conversion to coal burning equipment was impossible. Since that time we have given very thorough study to the problem, in an effort to determine a definite line of policy, in the light of existing and prospective supplies of oil.

There are many thousand private residences now heated by oil. We find that conversion op a large scale would involve the use of materials, particularly steel, which are in very short supply. There is the further difficulty of transporting coal in sufficient quantities to ensure that the converted units will have sufficient fuel to see them through the winter. Consequently, we have had to explore ways and means of making available more supplies of fuel oil from existing and prospective supplies of crude.

There is no reasonable hope that we can augment our existing supply of crude oil. Therefore if we are to refine more fuel oil we must do so at the expense of automobile gasoline. Accordingly, refiners of crude oil have been ordered to change their refinery runs so as to make more fuel oil, and less gasoline. By doing this, we hope to build up sufficient stocks of fuel oil between now and October first to provide for household heating equipment during the winter months. It must be understood, however, that even after these

steps have been taken, no guarantee can be given that fuel oil for domestic heating equipment will be available to meet normal requirements, because it is impossible to say at this time whether sufficient tankers will be available to maintain a continuous supply of crude. If there is a decrease in the anticipated supply through a loss of tankers, we shall have to draw on these reserves of fuel oil to take care of the armed services and war and essential industries. Therefore, my advice to those who heat their houses by oil is to convert their equipment if at all possible. Those who are in a position to convert, and do not do so, run the risk of having no fuel in the coming winter.

In so far as the commercial and industrial user is concerned, it will still be necessary for all those using fuel oil for the heating of commercial and industrial buildings, including apartment houses, hotels, institutions, stores, et cetera, to give up the use of fuel oil for heating as of July 31, 1942. This also applies to all those using fuel oil for the production of steam.

As I have pointed out, the building up of reserves of fuel oil for the winter months means the refining of less automobile gasoline. Accordingly, it has been decided that in the provinces of Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia, the value of the unit must be cut from five gallons to four. The unit will remain for the present at five gallons in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, and at two gallons in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. We hope to be in a position to raise the unit to three gallons in the maritimes as of midnight June 30. The changes in the value of the unit in the provinces of Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia will become effective at midnight to-morrow night.

After the ration system had been in operation for a short time the gravity of the supply situation made it necessary to re-categorize many thousands of those who were originally placed in higher than A categories. Many of these were reduced to category A. We also found that many of those originally in category A were owners of more than one car, or were using their cars almost entirely for pleasure purposes. It is obvious that these motorists should not receive as much gasoline as those who use their cars mainly in the earning of their livelihood. It has therefore been decided to establish a lower category, to be known as category A-A. The setting up of a new category takes time and I am not now in a position to state what the gasoline allowance for category A-A will be, or when it will become effective. This will be announced in due course.

Mobilization Act-Speaker's Ruling

Because there are many thousands of farmers, industrial workers and business men now in category A, the quarterly restriction of the coupon in this category will be abolished from midnight to-night. This means that the category A coupons, in any quarter, may be used at any time, regardless of the date printed on them.

Topic:   FUEL OIL AND GASOLINE
Subtopic:   CONDITIONS WITH RESPECT TO HOUSEHOLD
Sub-subtopic:   HEATING-REDUCTION IN VALUE OF GASOLINE RATION COUPONS IN CERTAIN PROVINCES
Permalink
LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

Regarding the rationing of gasoline and the categories in which owners of motor cars are placed, will the Minister of Munitions and Supply state whether there is a court of appeal other than the local court in each province to which those who believe that they have been unjustly dealt with may apply?

Topic:   FUEL OIL AND GASOLINE
Subtopic:   CONDITIONS WITH RESPECT TO HOUSEHOLD
Sub-subtopic:   HEATING-REDUCTION IN VALUE OF GASOLINE RATION COUPONS IN CERTAIN PROVINCES
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The court of appeal is the oil controller himself. If the reply of the local officer is not satisfactory, an appeal can be taken to the oil controller.

Topic:   FUEL OIL AND GASOLINE
Subtopic:   CONDITIONS WITH RESPECT TO HOUSEHOLD
Sub-subtopic:   HEATING-REDUCTION IN VALUE OF GASOLINE RATION COUPONS IN CERTAIN PROVINCES
Permalink

LABOUR CONDITIONS

EXTENSION BY ORDER IN COUNCIL OF CONTROL OVER LABOUR IN INDUSTRY


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. ANGUS MacINNIS (Vancouver East):

I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Labour. I notice in a press bulletin this afternoon an announcement that the control over labour in industry has been considerably extended. I wonder whether the minister is prepared to make a statement, or if not, will he say whether or not these regulations have been made by order in council, and will the order in council or the regulations be tabled?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   EXTENSION BY ORDER IN COUNCIL OF CONTROL OVER LABOUR IN INDUSTRY
Permalink
LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

The regulations were approved by myself under the authority of an order in council. I shall be glad to have them tabled immediately.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   EXTENSION BY ORDER IN COUNCIL OF CONTROL OVER LABOUR IN INDUSTRY
Permalink

MILITARY SERVICE

VALCARTIER CAMP-REQUEST FOR LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR BUTTER MAKER


On the orders of the day:


IND

Joseph Sasseville Roy

Independent

Mr. J. S. ROY (Gaspe):

I should like to direct the attention of the Minister of National Defence to a serious emergency which has arisen in my county. I believe that the reading of this short communication, which I translate, will explain the whole matter:

Ottawa, June 16, 1942. Mr. Jean Chaloult, Lt.-Colonel, Assistant-Commandant of District No. 5,

Post Office Building, Quebec.

Subject: E600448 Gagnon Omer Montmagny Regiment, Camp of Valcartier

Butter factory syndicate of Cap Chat county of Gasjfla is asking a leave for the above mentioned who is their butter maker. This butter factory receives daily six to eight thousand pounds of milk and is still closed at this late date.

Can you make diligence.

J. S. Roy, M.P.

Topic:   MILITARY SERVICE
Subtopic:   VALCARTIER CAMP-REQUEST FOR LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR BUTTER MAKER
Permalink
LIB

Georges Parent (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

That is a question, I think, which should be placed upon the order paper.

Topic:   MILITARY SERVICE
Subtopic:   VALCARTIER CAMP-REQUEST FOR LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR BUTTER MAKER
Permalink

MOBILIZATION ACT

AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS


The house resumed from Tuesday, June 16,. consideration of the motion of Mr. Mackenzie King for the second reading of Bill No. SO, to amend the National Resources Mobilization Act, 1940.


LIB

Georges Parent (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. member for

Vancouver East (Mr. Maclnnis) moved an amendment to Bill No. 80. I did not deal with it at the time, and I was requested by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) to deal with it to-day rather than yesterday. I have been considering the amendment, and 1 should like now to give my ruling.

On the motion of the Prime Minister that Bill No. 80, an act to amend the National Resources Mobilization Act, 1940, be now read a second time, Mr. Maclnnis moved, seconded by Mr. Noseworthy:

That all the words after "that" in the said motion be struck out and the following substituted therefor:

"This bill be not now read a second time but that it be resolved that the principle of the bill before the house is inadequate and inequitable, permits the governor general in council to conscript men for overseas service without reference to parliament and is, therefore, contrary to the peace, order and good government of Canada."

It will be noticed that the amendment, apart from the declaratory statement that "this bill be not now read a second time", takes the form of a resolution "that the principle of the bill before the house is inadequate and inequitable, permits the governor general in council to conscript men for overseas service without reference to parliament and is, therefore, contrary to the peace, order and good government of Canada."

This question is somewhat analogous to that discussed in connection with the amendment moved by the hon. member for Rose-town-Biggar on Thursday last, June 11, which I ruled out of order, as reported at pages 3281 and 3282 of Hansard. Before giving that decision I was referred to citation 775 of Beauchesne and also to citation 760, and if there had been no other feature than the principle laid down in citation 760, strengthen-

Mobilization Act-Speaker's Ruling

ed as it was by the same principle stated in May 391, I would have felt obliged to rule the amendment out of order, but as hon. members will recall there was another objection to its relevancy which admitted of no doubt that the house had already decided during this session on the same principle, and in support of that I quoted citation 304 of Beauchesne.

It is an accepted principle, both in this house and in the British House of Commons, that an amendment cannot deal with the provisions of the bill upon which it is moved, nor anticipate amendments thereto which may be moved in committee, and this amendment infringes upon that principle.

The amendment states that "the principle of the bill before the house is inadequate and inequitable". The word "inadequate" is a -general term which may in committee cover proposals in amendment of the clauses of sthe bill, but such proposals cannot be made at this stage of proceedings. The same observations will apply to the use of the word "inequitable". If amendments are contemplated by these words, they can only be moved in committee on the bill. This emphasizes the principle which I have already stated that amendments on the clauses of a bill cannot be anticipated on the second reading of a bill.

As reported in Denison's and Brand's Decisions, with respect to the British House of Commons, 1857 to 1884, we find reported at page 47 a statement by Mr. Speaker with respect to an amendment being made to the Franchise Act. I need not give the details in connection with that amendment, but in effect it dealt with certain regulations with respect to the Franchise Act. Mr. Speaker then said:

Before the hon. member moves his resolution I wish to point out to him that it exceeds the limits prescribed for such motions by the rules of the house. It is a resolution which, in reality, anticipates discussion on every clause of the bill, and on some points with respect to which notice of amendment has been already given. It seems to me to go beyond the rules laid down by the practice of this house.

That is the practice and procedure which has been followed in this house. It is, I am of opinion, a proper practice. To do otherwise would give rise to difficult and embarrassing situations. On an amendment in general terms such as this, if the house rejected the amendment and the house went into committee of the whole on the bill, the committee would be bound by the decision of the house and it would be deprived of its freedom of action in dealing with the clauses of the bill.

If the committee of the whole decided upon amendments to the bill within the terms of this amendment, the house would not be able to concur in the committee's report because the house has already decided against such amendments. The house should not approve and disapprove the same questions on the same bill in the same session.

For these reasons I rule that the amendment is out of order.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

I understand that that is your ruling, Mr. Speaker, and I realize I would not be within my rights in discussing it now. Therefore I accept Your Honour's ruling, regretting very much that I did not know it was going to be made. I had thought I would have had an opportunity of discussing the ruling before it was made.

Topic:   MOBILIZATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SECTION 3 PROVIDING LIMITATION IN RESPECT OF SERVICE OVERSEAS
Permalink

June 17, 1942