June 11, 1942

UNITED KINGDOM-U.S.S.R. TREATY ALLIANCE IN WAR AGAINST HITLERITE GERMANY AND COLLABORATION AND MUTUAL ASSISTANCE THEREAFTER

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I wish to lay on the table a copy of the treaty between the U.S.S.R. and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland of alliance in the war against Hitlerite Germany and her associates in Europe and of collaboration and mutual assistance thereafter.

A copy of this treaty was to-day, I believe, tabled in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom. The government of Canada has sent the following message, through myself, to Mr. Churchill, the Prime Minister of Great Britain:

The Canadian government are very much pleased that the negotiations which have been proceeding between the governments of the United Kingdom and the U.S.S.R. have reached a successful conclusion. We believe that the new treaty will greatly contribute to the successful prosecution of the war and to the realization after the war of the principles of the Atlantic charter.

Topic:   UNITED KINGDOM-U.S.S.R. TREATY ALLIANCE IN WAR AGAINST HITLERITE GERMANY AND COLLABORATION AND MUTUAL ASSISTANCE THEREAFTER
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POOLING OF RESOURCES

ESTABLISHMENT OF JOINT UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM BOARDS ON PRODUCTION, RESOURCES AND FOOD

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I promised my hon. friend the leader of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (Mr. Coldwell) that I would give him a brief statement to-day with respect to closer coordination of United Kingdom and United States production programmes, to which he made reference yesterday.

The Canadian government cordially welcomes the new arrangements for the closer coordination of the United Kingdom and United States production programmes, which were announced in Washington on June 9. The United Kingdom-United States combined production and resources board and combined food board should help greatly in the vitally important task of integrating, for war purposes, the productive capacities of both countries.

The Canadian food production programme has been geared to the needs of the war situation for two years now. From the outset of the war we have been proceeding on the policy that the entire food resources of Canada and the United Kingdom were in a common pool, about which the fullest information has been exchanged. We have, for example, been working for more than two years on a programme of increasing our bacon and cheese production to meet the United Kingdom's war requirements, and have been cutting down our domestic consumption of such essential products to make sure that the basic requirements of the United Kingdom were met. More recently, through the medium of the Canada-United States joint economic committees, the two governments have been working out a war-time agricultural programme under which each country can devote its energies to expanding the production of those farm products which it is best equipped to contribute to the common cause.

Similarly, in the field of industrial war production, Canadian capacity has been expanded and developed in the closest possible cooperation, first with the United Kingdom and now with the United States as well. Through the operations of the Canada-United

Questions

States joint war production committee and of War Supplies Limited, the efficient integration for war purposes of Canadian-American productive capacity has been making satisfactory progress. The new direct arrangements for formalizing a similar United Kingdom-United States relationship should help greatly in organizing the war effort of the united nations as a whole.

The task of working out suitable working arrangements for the effective cooperation of the united nations in the job of winning the war is still incomplete. The creation of the new boards announced this week marks a long step forward in the problem of organization. Through what agencies and representatives our existing cooperation with both the United Kingdom and the United States can most effectively be coordinated with the new United Kingdom-United States boards is receiving the consideration of the government.

Topic:   POOLING OF RESOURCES
Subtopic:   ESTABLISHMENT OF JOINT UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM BOARDS ON PRODUCTION, RESOURCES AND FOOD
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

With the early part of the statement of the Prime Minister I am in agreement. But inasmuch as our food and munitions production in Canada has advanced from the low gear to the second gear stage-we hope that we are now working on all eight cylinders, and in high gear-are we to be left, with respect to these joint boards, with representation by a citizen of the United States, no matter how eminent or capable he may be? Surely Canada has arrived at the stature of a nation, and if there is to be representation it should be by a representative of this government. I am sure the Prime Minister will agree with that and insist upon that position.

Topic:   POOLING OF RESOURCES
Subtopic:   ESTABLISHMENT OF JOINT UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM BOARDS ON PRODUCTION, RESOURCES AND FOOD
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I certainly do not take any exception to what my hon. friend the leader of the opposition has said. All I would point out is that the agreement just concluded between the United States and the United Kingdom was reached within the past day or two. I have no doubt, having regard to our position and to the relationships that we have had both with the British government and with the United States government, that we shall be able to effect some arrangement in connection with food production along the line indicated by my [DOT]hon. friend.

Topic:   POOLING OF RESOURCES
Subtopic:   ESTABLISHMENT OF JOINT UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM BOARDS ON PRODUCTION, RESOURCES AND FOOD
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


MALTON AIR FIELD-ROADWAY TO TORONTO

NAT

Mr. CHURCH:

National Government

1. What steps are being taken by the government to improve the roadway leading to Malton air plant?

2. What contribution did the city of Toronto and the government make to the erection of the air plants at (a) Malton, (b) Toronto island?

3. What use is being made of these plants in connection with the war?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MALTON AIR FIELD-ROADWAY TO TORONTO
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. The construction and maintenance of roads to Malton airport is not within the jurisdiction of the Dominion government. A grant of $25,000, however, was made towards the construction of better highway connections with the city of Toronto by the Department of Transport.

2. The total capital expenditures on the Malton and Island airports are as follows: Expenditure by the city, $986,000; grant from province of Ontario, $450,000; expenditure by Department of Transport, $690,345; expenditure by Trans-Canada Air Lines for hangar, $135,000.

3. The following use is made of Malton airport: 1. Normal civil air transport services

by Trans-Canada Air Lines and American airlines; 2. No. 1, air observer school, and No. 2 elementary flying training school, under the joint air training plan; 3. Testing of aircraft manufactured in the adjoining factories.

The following use is made of Toronto Island airport:

1. The training activities of the Royal Norwegian Air Force.

2. The communications section of the Royal Canadian Air Force for transporting their own personnel.

3. Non-scheduled operations by seaplane and landplane operators.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MALTON AIR FIELD-ROADWAY TO TORONTO
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SASKATCHEWAN COMMUNITY PASTURES

NAT

Mr. PERLEY:

National Government

1. How many community pastures were established in the province of Saskatchewan during the year 1941?

2. What was the cost of each, (a) acquiring of property or land, (b) fencing, showing average rate per mile?

3. Was any fencing done by contract?

4. If so, what are the names of the contractors and what was the average rate per mile?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SASKATCHEWAN COMMUNITY PASTURES
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LIB

Mr. GARDINER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Nine.

2. (a) Nil.

(b) Masefield, L.I.D. No. 17, $16,295.55, average $388.00; Lone Tree, No. 18, $21,929.30, average $395.12; Lomond, No. 37, $14,270.85, average $328.07; Val Marie extension, $39,818.50, average $355.72; Shamrock, No. 134, $17,350.80, average $301.75; Big Stick, No. 141, $14,544.98, average $309.47; Spy Hill,

Questions

No. 152, S10,546.35, average $357.50; Beaver Hills, No. 152, $30,121.13, average $327.40; Monet, No. 257, No. 2, $13,850.75, average $364.49.

3. No.

4. Answered by No. 3.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SASKATCHEWAN COMMUNITY PASTURES
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SASKATCHEWAN WATER CONSERVATION PROJECTS

NAT

Mr. PERLEY:

National Government

1. How many dugouts were contracted for and completed in each constituency in the province of Saskatchewan during the year 1941, and what was the average cost of same?

2. How many water projects, other than small dams, were undertaken and completed during the year 1941 in the province of Saskatchewan?

3. What water conservation projects are contemplated in the province of Saskatchewan during the year 1942, other than small dams?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SASKATCHEWAN WATER CONSERVATION PROJECTS
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LIB

Mr. GARDINER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Average

Constituency Number CostAssiniboia ... 77 $103 80Weyburn ... 158 Wood Mountain ... 25 Maple Creek ... 19 Qu'Appelle ... 188 Moose Jaw .. 112 Swift Current ... 91 Melville .. 449 Lake Centre .. 127 Rosetown-Biggar .... ... 50 Kindersley ... 55 Yorkton .. 237 McKenzie ... 335 Rosthern .. 69 The Battlefords ... 67 North Battleford .... Prince Albert .. 2 Humboldt .. 69 2. Eight. 3. Six: 1. Completion of Duncairn dam andreservoir. 2. Completion of Highfield dam andreservoir. 3. Comletion of drainage canal from Rush

lake to Reed lake.

4. Completion of Echo lake dam.

5. Completion of Last Mountain lake creek

dredging.

6. Completion of Cypress lake inlet and outlet canal improvements.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SASKATCHEWAN WATER CONSERVATION PROJECTS
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NOVA SCOTIA DAIRY PRODUCTS

LIB

Gordon Timlin Purdy

Liberal

Mr. PURDY:

Have arrangements as yet been made adjusting the inequalities in the prices authorized for fluid milk and other dairy products in Nova Scotia?

[Mr. Gardiner.}

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NOVA SCOTIA DAIRY PRODUCTS
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June 11, 1942