June 10, 1942

PRIVILEGE

MU. DOUGLAS (WEYBURN)-EDITORIAL COMMENT IN MONTREAL "GAZETTE"

CCF

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. T. C. DOUGLAS (Weyburn):

I rise to a question of privilege. An editorial appearing in this morning's Montreal Gazette, referring to a statement I made in the house a few days ago, reads:

Most amazing of all was his protest on Monday against large shipments of Canadian beer to Libya for the use of the troops who are defending him and his family and his congregation under the appalling conditions of desert warfare. It was this that roused Mr. Ilsley's ire and the minister would have been less than a man if he had held his punch.

I desire to invite the gentleman who wrote that editorial to examine the remarks I made last Monday, and he will find that at no time did I make any reference either to. Libya or to the sending of beer to that battlefront; that as a matter of fact it was the minister himself who dealt with that question. In reply to the minister I said, as reported at page 3151 of Hansard:

Then he proceeded to build up a straw man and to knock him down again, by referring to what people have said about sending beer to Libya. I was not talking about sending beer to Libya.

I have no objection to accepting responsibility for what I have said, but I do not propose to accept responsibility for straw men set up by the Minister of Finance.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MU. DOUGLAS (WEYBURN)-EDITORIAL COMMENT IN MONTREAL "GAZETTE"
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PRIVATE BILLS COMMITTEE

LIB

Thomas F. Donnelly

Liberal

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain) moved:

That the second and third reports of the standing committee on miscellaneous private bills, presented on June 8, be now concurred in.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS COMMITTEE
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Motion agreed to.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


WARTIME HOUSING-GENERAL MANAGER

NAT

Mr. CARDIFF:

National Government

1. What salary is paid to Mr. G. L. Goggin as general manager of the Wartime Housing Limited?

2. What was the date of his appointment?

3. What is the amount of his travelling expenses up to and including April 30, 1942?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME HOUSING-GENERAL MANAGER
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME HOUSING-GENERAL MANAGER
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WARTIME MERCHANT SHIPPING LIMITED

CCF

Mr. MacINNIS:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What are the names of the members of Wartime Merchant Shipping Limited?

2. What is the occupation or profession of each member and with what companies is each connected ?

3. What are the functions of Wartime Merchant Shipping Limited?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME MERCHANT SHIPPING LIMITED
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

1 and 2. H. R. MacMillan, president, president, H. R. MacMillan Export Company Limited; C. R. Redfern, vice-president, engineer, president, Redfern Construction Company Limited; Austin C. Taylor, vicepresident, president, Bralorne Mines Limited; C. L. Dewar, comptroller, engineer, The Bell Telephone Company of Canada; H. A. Stevenson, assistant to the president, vice-president, Canadian Transport Company Limited; G. D. Eccott, treasurer, chartered accountant; Wm. Mitchell, secretary, lawyer, Kearney, Duquet and Mackay; D. B. McCoy, manager, Purchasing Dept., assistant general manager, The Steel Company of Canada, Limited; C. C. Coull, manager, Engineering Division, engineer; H. T. Mitchell, manager, Labour Training and.

Questions

Supply Division, president, Mitchell Printing and Publishing Company Limited; N. Beaton, manager, Plant and Yard Expansion Division, engineer; N. Dobson, manager, Shipbuilding Division, senior surveyor, Lloyd's Register of Shipping; G. 0. Vogan, executive assistant to the general manager, engineer; J. Husband, manager, Steel Division, salesman; G. S. Burrows, liaison officer, Washington, D.C., engineer, United Steel Corporation Limited; L. J. R. Sanders, manager, Production Division, engineer.

3. (a) Supervision, direction and administration of all contracts entered into by His Majesty or the Minister of Munitions and Supply in respect of the construction and assembly of cargo vessels in Canada or the design, construction, equipment and operation of shipyards, plants, or other buildings or shipways for any such purposes, the whole in accordance with such general or specific instructions as the minister may give to the company from time to time.

(b) The conduct of negotiations looking to the making of contracts in respect of the construction and assembly of cargo vessels in Canada or the design, construction, equipment and operation of shipyards, plants, or other buildings or shipways for any such purposes and the preparation of drafts of such contracts for submission to the minister for his consideration, the whole in accordance with such general or specific instructions as the minister may give to the company from time to time and subject to his approval.

(c) The coordination and expedition, in cases in which the minister may so request, of the construction or assembly of cargo vessels in the Dominion of Canada under contracts, the performance of which is for the time being under administration by the company.

(d) The payment of accounts properly chargeable against the above-mentioned contracts.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME MERCHANT SHIPPING LIMITED
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NATIONAL REGISTRATION-SKILLED WORKERS

CCF

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What use has been made by the government of the 1940 national registration to place experienced and preferred tradesmen into war industry?

2. How many skilled tradesmen, toolmakers, metal workers, machinists and engineers are still unemployed or in non-essential industry?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL REGISTRATION-SKILLED WORKERS
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LIB

Mr. MITCHELL: (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

1. From the 1940 national registration lists were compiled of registrants who reported they were skilled in certain "specialized" occupations. These occupations were selected on a broad basis to determine the persons who, by training or experience, might be fitted for

employment in industries or services essential to Canada's war effort. From these lists requests, from government departments, from the armed forces, and from firms and individuals for names and addresses of persons skilled in designated occupations, were answered. The names of unemployed mechanics in the metal and shipbuilding trades were selected from the lists, and these men were communicated with in respect to placement in war industries. The names of those still available for employment were supplied to the most convenient offices of the employment service of Canada so that placements could be effected.

2. Information in respect to the number of skilled tradesmen, toolmakers, metal workers, machinists and engineers still unemployed will not be available until the registration of unemployed male persons, presently in progress, is completed. Information in respect to the number of such persons in non-essential industries will not be available until completion of the tabulation of the unemployment insurance commission registration of April 1, 1942.

women's voluntary services

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL REGISTRATION-SKILLED WORKERS
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UNITY

Mrs. NIELSEN:

Unity

1. What organizational plans have been carried into effect by the director of women's voluntary services?

2. What plans have been made for coordination of voluntary services of women?

3. What are the names of the organizations within the scope of the branch of women's voluntary services in each province, district or community to which women desiring to volunteer their services may apply?

4. What channels of publicity, if any, are being used by this branch to inform women of the facilities of the women's voluntary services?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL REGISTRATION-SKILLED WORKERS
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LIB

Mr. THORSON: (Minister of National War Services)

Liberal

1. The plan of organization and development of the women's voluntary services division, which is hereto attached, has been mimeographed and mailed to all the women's organizations. Four cities have appointed local committees to study the need of coordination of voluntary services and a number of other communities have made inquiries. A western trip is being made in the near future in response to requests for discussion and advice.

2. The organization of central volunteer bureaux locally is being encouraged. These serve as manning pools for voluntary effort thereby functioning as the clearing house for volunteers serving existing local organizations and acting as a reservoir for organizations to secure additional volunteers for their increased activities.

3. National Organizations: Red Cross, St. John Ambulance, Navy League, Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire, National Council of Women, Canadian Federation of University Women, Canadian Business and Professional Women's Club, national professional organizations, Catholic Women's leagues, national minority groups, Women's Institutes, fraternal organizations.

Provincial Organizations: The provincial

counterparts of the national organizations, provincial home and school clubs, provincial adult education, La Ligue de la Jeunesse Feminine.

Community: Auxiliary services (coordinating councils, citizens committees, volunteer bureaux), health and welfare services, home and school clubs, trades and labour councils, labour auxiliaries, cooperatives, church groups. Each community has a certain number of these organizations or may have additional organizations not listed.

4. Copies of the memorandum "Organization and Development of the Women's Voluntary Services" have been mailed to all the organizations named in the answer to question 3; speaking at provincial and national annual meetings of various women's organizations; press releases; radio-one radio talk; bulletin of set-up for volunteer bureaux is prepared; individual correspondence; many personal contacts with representatives of national, provincial and local organizations.

Organization and development of the women's voluntary services

World War One rallied to it a volunteer service that resulted in social service organizations being created in the period that followed. World War Two is rallying many volunteers who have had no previous volunteer experience but who are spurred on to give a maximum service in the war effort.

The women's voluntary services division gives impetus to this effort. Its objectives are:

1. To unite both voluntary war work and civilian services in such a way that the whole volunteer movement marches forward in a coordinated whole on a community basis.

2. To recognize the difference in community set-up so that the plan of coordination will vary as the structure of war work and civilian services varies.

3. To be of service in an advisory capacity so that duplication and waste of effort may be reduced to a minimum. This may be accomplished by

(a) Strengthening civilian morale by such volunteer activity as will provide satisfaction and a feeling of accomplishment to the volunteer.

Questions

(b) Stimulating women to understand total war so that organizations may be encouraged to give volunteer service that will adapt itself to the constantly changing war scene.

(c) Encouraging the development and extension of training and lecture courses so that volunteers may be more proficient in their performance; but more especially, that they may understand the reasons for changes and development in war and civilian activities.

4. To stimulate interest in needed war time projects by organizing and directing these on a demonstration basis.

5. To encourage the organizing of emergency squads to be called upon as necessary.

6. To help create a community volunteer structure that will continue as the nation passes from war to peace.

Keeping in mind communities have difference in tradition, geographic position, size, etc., each community must be studied as an entity, yet certain basic procedures apply to all. For general purposes communities may be classified into two groups.

1. The large urban community. These usually have a council of social agencies or a welfare council which sponsors a volunteer bureau and through it correlates volunteer effort and acts as a clearing house for volunteers.

In these communities the principle of cooperation and coordination is not new. The council of social agencies has for years been the planning body for welfare organizations and their civilian services while the welfare council, later in development, functions to coordinate all community endeavour for the general welfare of its citizens.

The volunteer bureau may be set up as a committee of either council. It surveys the need for volunteers and recruits them. It keeps records of their qualifications, capabilities and experience so they may be placed with the organization where they can give the most effective service.

Training courses and lectures of a specific nature given by experts in various fields should be a function of a well organized bureau.

Every community is developing auxiliary services or citizens committees to assist in the welfare, comfort and recreation of the men in training.

The volunteer effort is directed mainly through

(1) Welfare councils or councils of social agencies.

(2) Volunteer bureaux.

(3) Citizen committees and auxiliary services.

Questions

It is therefore most important that in order to prevent overlapping and wasted effort there should be coordination. This may be achieved through a coordinating council representative of councils of social agencies, national organizations and governmental bodies. The interrelation between civilian and war services might be strengthened by the secretary of the council of social agencies or welfare council acting as secretary to the coordinating council. In any event the person selected as secretary of the coordinating council should have intimate knowledge of the welfare set-up of the community.

2. The smaller community. These communities are not likely to have a council of social agencies or a welfare council, but there will be one or two social agencies such as the childrens aid society, Victorian Order of Nurses, the relief officer, or the medical officer of health or a unit of the women's institutes.

Where such is the case, it would seem possible to coordinate the volunteer effort through a volunteer bureau. As the war progresses, new committees will be set up to meet new war-time services such as consumer groups to assist in price control, salvage committees to organize the salvage of the community, rehabilitation committees to assist in the rehabilitation of the returned soldier. This effort will be most effectively directed if organized through a volunteer bureau.

The foregoing statement of the women's voluntary services division clearly indicates that its purpose is not to set up a national organization in Ottawa forcing a set plan of volunteer organization on local communities, but rather by studying a community, help it so to organize its effort that total war may be waged without waste or duplication of effort in the volunteer field.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL REGISTRATION-SKILLED WORKERS
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WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD- MRS. MCLAWS

June 10, 1942