March 12, 1942

RIGHT HON. RAOUL DANDURAND TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OP THE LATE LEADER OP THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SENATE

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, as hon. members are aware, shortly after sundown last night the life of the Right Honourable Raoul Dan-durand, leader of the government in the Senate, came to its earthly close. Less than twenty-four hours before, Senator Dandurand had been present in the Senate conducting its proceedings, as he had been wont to do in all but five of the last twenty years. Of the Senate itself, he had been a member for forty-four years. In years of service, he was, in fact, its oldest member. Indeed, in years of continuous service, he was the oldest living member of the parliament of Canada.

On November the 4th of last year Senator Dandurand celebrated his eightieth birthday anniversaiy. Some weeks later, when parliament had reassembled, this anniversary -was made the occasion of a presentation ceremony in the Senate, at which felicitations on his long and distinguished career were extended to him on the part of leaders and members of both houses of parliament.

Despite his great age, the Senator possessed a remarkable vitality of body and mind. He had suffered no infirmity in the course of his [DOT] life. In the early morning of yesterday he felt as well as ever. At breakfast he experienced a sudden seizure of pain, which, however, did not last for long, but left him very weak. He rested throughout the day, at times conversing with his accustomed keenness of expression, with those at his side. The end came peacefully. One might truly say it was a fitting, indeed a beautiful close to a long, a great and a good life. Having sat in the Senate since the closing years of the last century, Senator Dandurand was in himself a link with the past -with the earlier political life of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and of those others who have laboured to establish firmly the foundations of our nationhood. Like Sir Wilfrid, he strove, in public and private life alike, to promote under-

Right Hon. Raoul Dandurand

standing and cooperation between the two great races of the dominion, and on this basis to preserve and strengthen the bonds of a common nationality.

Although his own career, and many of the traditions with which it came to be identified, had its origin in an earlier generation, Senator Dandurand did not live in the past. He took a keen and active interest in the questions alike of peace and of war. To the deliberations of the war committee of the cabinet he brought a wide knowledge of international affairs, and a strong sense of practical reality. To the last, his life was characterized by a spirit of helpfulness. As a former Speaker of the Senate, as government leader in that chamber for many years and as a member of the administration, he gave exceptional service to Canada.

Senator Dandurand was first and foremost a citizen of Canada, but he was also, in larger measure, I believe, than any other Canadian of his generation, a citizen of the world. His deep and abiding affection for the people of his native province and of his native land did not preclude a kinship with mankind which so broadened his interests as to embrace other lands and other races. There will be those in many other countries, as well as throughout our own, who will deeply regret the passing of one whom they had come to regard as a personal friend and as a tireless worker on behalf of international goodwill.

For six years in succession, Senator Dandurand represented Canada at the assembly of the League of Nations, and in 1925 was elected president of the league assembly. During practically the whole three years that Canada was a member of the league council, he was a Canadian representative on the council. At the league he won for himself an enviable international reputation as an authority on social questions and as a champion of the rights of minorities. The record of his devoted labours at the league is a part of the history of international affairs.

It has been well said of Senator Dandurand that there was about him an innate distinction of manner, combined with a gentleness of spirit which made him one of the beloved as he was one of the most familiar figures in Canadian public life. He exemplified in his career the finest traditions of public service, and indeed helped, by precept and example, to add to them. His life and work may well serve as an inspiration to those of our own and of succeeding generations who seek to play a useful and honourable role in the administration of the affairs of our country.

Personally I cannot say how grateful I feel for all that the close association and friendship which I shared with Senator Dandurand has meant to me in the course of my public life.

We had been friend's over forty years. For fifteen of those years he and I shared responsibilities in the cabinet and leadership of the government, in the Senate and House of Commons respectively. During the still longer years I have had the responsibility of the leadership of the Liberal party, in opposition and in office, I doubt if I could possibly have begun to 'cope with many of the problems of one in that position without the wise counsel, guidance and loyal cooperation he so constantly and unswervingly accorded me. In all his personal and public relationships Senator Dandurand was fidelity itself.

Although his voice will be heard no more in the councils of the nations, in the hearts alike of his fellow-countrymen and of the friends of justice and peace in other lands, the memory will long endure of Senator Dandurand's continuous and untiring efforts to promote the common well-being of mankind.

Topic:   RIGHT HON. RAOUL DANDURAND TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OP THE LATE LEADER OP THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SENATE
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition) :

Mr. Speaker, this parliament and the people of Canada have been greatly shocked by the announcement of the sudden death of the Right Hon. Raoul Dandurand last evening. His death marks the passing from the political scene of one of Canada's best known public men.

Born fourscore years ago in the city of Montreal, where he made his home, received his education and practised his profession, he rose to be a national figure in the fields of finance and statesmanship.

The friend of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, he was, at the comparatively early age of thirty-seven, appointed to the Senate. There his qualifications marked' him out for advancement and he soon became a commanding figure. In 1905 he rvas appointed Speaker, and in 1921, when my right hon. friend became Prime Minister, Senator Dandurand was made a member of t'he cabinet and the representative of the government in the Senate, which position he occupied until 1930, and again in 1935 until the time of his death.

His achievements in the realm of international politics are well known, particularly in relation to the League of Nations, of which he was a warm supporter. He occupied, respectively, the position of a Canadian delegate to the League of Nations, President of the Assembly and, later on, a delegate to the council of the league, a reputation which no Canadian since Sir Robert Borden has surpassed.

Contemplating in retrospect the life and career of Senator Dandurand, one cannot help but be impressed by the realization of w*hat a full and happy life he had. Even prior to his appointment to the Senate, he

Right Hon. Raoul Dandurand

had played a leading part in the public life of his native province; and' during the forty-four years he was a member of the Senate, no one took a more important and active part in the deliberations of that body.

In July last he received the highest honour at present in the right of Canadians to receive-membership in His Majesty's Imperial Privy Council.

My own relations with him were friendly. I often met him in Ottawa and1 on the trains. He was an engaging personality and a first-rate raconteur. Many times I have enjoyed my conversations with him.

He was a vigorous champion of his own opinions and of the aspirations of his compatriots.

His passing leaves a very distinct blank in the government of the country. I desire to extend to my right hon. friend and to his followers my sincere expressions of sympathy and regret.

Topic:   RIGHT HON. RAOUL DANDURAND TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OP THE LATE LEADER OP THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SENATE
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Thomas Miller Bell

Mr. M. J. COLD WELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, we join in mourning to-day the passing of one whose life was both useful and full. That Senator Dandurand was what we seldom see in our own dominion-and what we hope we may see more of in the years to come-a Canadian statesman with an international outlook, was recognized not only in our own country but in other countries of the world. He received distinguished honours at the hands of the people not only of Canada, but of France, from whose culture he derived so much inspiration. I shall always associate the late Senator Dandurand with the noble efforts that were made following the last great war to secure world peace. He was faithful to the ideals of collective security- sometimes called a noble experiment which failed; but I believe- the day will yet come when upon the foundations' laid by him and others like him will be erected a structure which will not fall and will not fail.

I did not know Senator Dandurand well, but I often used to see him in the corridors and the picture which I shall carry in my mind as long as I remain in these associations is of a noble and friendly figure Standing beside the throne in the Senate chamber, and bringing to my mind the words of Geoffrey Chaucer, "he was a verray parfit gentil knight."

Topic:   RIGHT HON. RAOUL DANDURAND TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OP THE LATE LEADER OP THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SENATE
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, naturally when one passes who has filled for so many years so large a place in the public eye as Senator Dandurand, the first reaction is one of shock and regret. But I believe that in the contemplation of this man's life and of his passing most people will feel that he has been blessed in his going hence as he had been in his living here. He

has had a long, rich and abundant life, full of activity, full of striving for the ideals which guided him; a life crowned with a large measure of success. I do not know how anyone could ask of life anything finer. Now that he has closed that life without pain, without regret, I think there is cause for satisfaction and comfort.

We join with those who will extend sympathy to the bereaved ones, for no matter how far advanced one may be in years, when he passes there will be an empty place at the fireside and there will be hearts that are lonely because he is no longer here. To these we extend our sympathy and condolences.

Topic:   RIGHT HON. RAOUL DANDURAND TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OP THE LATE LEADER OP THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SENATE
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS YIEN (Outrement) (Translation) :

Topic:   RIGHT HON. RAOUL DANDURAND TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OP THE LATE LEADER OP THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SENATE
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CANADIAN ARMY

AMENDMENT OP SPECIAL REGULATIONS- PROVISIONS RESPECTING LEAVE AND POSTPONEMENT OF TRAINING

LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. RALSTON (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to lay on the table order in council P.C. 1916, which contains several amendments to the reserve army (special) regulations. There are amendments respecting clothing allowance, notification of change of address, and penalties for failure to report: that has to do with men called up for training under the National Resources Mobilization Act.

Several hon. members have asked with regard to the regulations, which I mentioned in Hansard at page 818, whereby we are endeavouring to secure a more uniform method of administering provisions for leave or postponement by utilizing, even though men have commenced their training, the boards which have been appointed under the Department of National War Services. An amendment to that effect is embodied in this order in council which I am laying on the table.

In order that the house may have a general outline of the provision, it is this. Applications may be made by men who are in training under the National Resources Mobilization Act for leave at any time within three months after enlistment or after the commencement of training, and those applications may be granted under circumstances similar to those under which a man would have been granted postponement of training had he applied before his training commenced; or,

as the order in council provides, leave may be granted where the circumstances show extreme hardship to dependents. The procedure is that the man who is already in training applies to his commanding officer, giving the grounds of his application, which should be verified by affidavit or by statutory declaration. The commanding officer forwards this material with his own recommendation to the district officer commanding-that is necessary in order that they may get in touch with the board-and the district officer commanding transmits that material to the board with any recommendation he has to make. The board then review the application just as they would review an application for postponement if made previous to training, and the provision in the order in council is that the district officer commanding shall give effect to the recommendation of the board, with one exception. That is to say, he has no discretion to turn down the recommendation of the board unless at that particular time the military situation is such that the exigencies require that leave be curtailed or refused; in that case he may refer the matter to national defence headquarters. Hon. members will understand, of course, that that is under special circumstances, but the general provision is that the recommendation of the board is to be accepted by the district officer commanding.

While that procedure is, under the order in council, permissive, instructions are being issued by the Department of National Defence that that is the procedure which shall be followed.

There is also a provision in the amendment whereby the boards are given specific authority to hear these cases. Another provision is to the effect that boards are given authority to hear any other cases or classes of cases which are specially referred to them by the adjutant general. That applies not only to men in training, but to the Canadian army home defence or the Canadian active army- either one.

I believe that this outline will give hon. members who have been asking about this matter the necessary information. The order in council is tabled so that hon. members may get full particulars if they desire.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OP SPECIAL REGULATIONS- PROVISIONS RESPECTING LEAVE AND POSTPONEMENT OF TRAINING
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

I take it that this applies only to those who are called up under the compulsory training plan and not to men who have voluntarily enlisted. A case came to my attention this morning of a woman in my own constituency who has four sons. One is in the army overseas, another is in the navy, a third is working on home defence, and the

Questions

fourth son, she tells me, has been called up for the air force. I do not understand that; he must have enlisted voluntarily. But she ipleads with me to do something to get her fourth and last son out of the armed forces. I have written her explaining what I understand to be the position. I suppose this amendment will not apply in a case of that kind.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OP SPECIAL REGULATIONS- PROVISIONS RESPECTING LEAVE AND POSTPONEMENT OF TRAINING
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

No. This does not apply to the air force. The general provision to which I have just referred may, however, apply to the Canadian active army or to the home defence army. That is to say, there is power in the order in council for the adjutant general to refer those cases to the board. The order in council does not provide that they must be referred to the board. As the order in council stands the only cases which are specifically provided for, in connection with which the board's decision is to be taken, are cases where men are called up under the National Resources Mobilization Act and are actually in training.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OP SPECIAL REGULATIONS- PROVISIONS RESPECTING LEAVE AND POSTPONEMENT OF TRAINING
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.) 1942 VICTORY LOAN


LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

I would ask the hon. member to be good enough to consent to this question being dropped. The information will not be available for several weeks at least and perhaps for a longer period than that. When it is available the breakdown into categories will not correspond with the breakdown contained in clause 3 of the question. If it were made an order for return it would not serve any purpose because the information available up to the time the order for return is passed is the only information that goes into the return. I think therefore the only course left is to drop the question for the time being.

Question dropped.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
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PURCHASE OF THE "SAN KATY"

CCF

Mr. GILLIS:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. From whom did the government purchase the boat San Katy'i

2. What was the purchase price?

3. What was the cost to the government of reconditioning this boat for mine laying purposes?

4. Is the said boat now in service?

5. If not, why?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PURCHASE OF THE "SAN KATY"
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LIB

Mr. MACDONALD (Kingston City): (Minister of National Defence for Naval Services)

Liberal

1. Northumberland Ferries, Limited.

2. $83,900 has been paid. There is a pending reference to the exchequer court of Canada to settle the claim of the former owner, for a larger amount.

3. $97,213.39.

4. Yes.

5. Answered by No. 4.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PURCHASE OF THE "SAN KATY"
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UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE-PERSONS HAVING SERVED IN H.M. FORCES

CON

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Since the inception of the Unemployment Insurance Act how many persons have received payments thereunder?

2. What are the numbers and occupations by provinces of such persons?

3. How many of the said recipients have been on service in his majesty's forces during the present war and of those how many are in receipt of payment under the said act as of this date?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE-PERSONS HAVING SERVED IN H.M. FORCES
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March 12, 1942