February 27, 1942

PRIVILEGE-MR. POULIOT BRUCE COAL COMPANY-EMPLOYMENT OP A. E. BRADFIELD


Mr. JEAN-FRANQOIS POULIOT (Temis-couata): Mr. Speaker, if I may be permitted once more to use the traditional parliamentary language of other days and rise to a question of privilege, as a private Liberal member of this honourable house, I would bring to your attention the wording I used yesterday as reported at page 846 of Hansard: My second question is whether the secretary of that company is at present in the employ of the government, in the Department of Munitions and Supply. I was not stating, sir, that the man in question was in the Department of Munitions and Supply; I was asking if he was in the employ of the government in that department, which is altogether different. Then in yesterday's Evening Citizen, five o'clock edition, under the headline, "Pouliot Declares Bruce Company Official is Government Employee," I find this paragraph: So and so- I need not repeat the man's name. -reported by Mr. Pouliot to be secretary of the Bruce Coal Company, is not now and never had been an employee of the department, Mr. Howe told the press this afternoon. My reason for rising to-day, sir, is that private members, whether Liberal, Conservative, C.C.F. or Social Credit, are handicapped by the fact that the public accounts are lacking in detail. Therefore when some information is asked from any minister of the crown, the answer should not be misleading, and no minister has the right to split hairs in answering any question put by any member with regard to the expenditure of public funds, in salaries or otherwise. I took the trouble to write the civil service commission in order to obtain further information. My letter was written yesterday afternoon, immediately after I saw the item in the Citizen. The reply is as follows: Civil Service Commission Office of the Secretary File No. FT-MS-3206 Ottawa, February 2,7, 1942. Dear Mr. Pouliot, Replying to your inquiry of the 26th instant, I beg to advise you that the civil service commission has been notified by the comptroller of the treasury that Mr. "Albert Edward Bradfield reported for duty on January 8, 1942, in the capacity of departmental account- ant, grade 3, munitions and supply cost accounting office at Ottawa, at a salary of $2,700 per annum. The duties of the position are set out in the requisition: "To investigate costs in connection with contracts for the Department of Munitions and Supply." The civil service commission has not issued a certificate for Mr. Bradfield's employment. Yours very truly, E. Saunders, Secretary. I want you, sir, to understand my point, as I am sure you do. Technically perhaps the man was not in the Department of Munitions and Supply, but he was there in person, just the same as the accountant of the House of Commons is in this building, though he comes under the Minister of Finance. Therefore, sir, summarizing all that I have said, I do not speak very often-


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. POULIOT BRUCE COAL COMPANY-EMPLOYMENT OP A. E. BRADFIELD
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

-if hon. members think I do speak often, at least my remarks are very brief, but I try to do my work just as conscientiously as I can, and I am not a conscientious objector. I want exact answers, and I do not want any more misleading answers of this kind from any minister of the crown.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. POULIOT BRUCE COAL COMPANY-EMPLOYMENT OP A. E. BRADFIELD
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Temiscouata (Mr. Pouliot) asked his question when the orders of the day were called at the last sitting of the house. This is the first opportunity I have had to answer his question. An answer has been prepared, and I shall now read it.

Whilst A. E. Bradfield is not now and never has been an employee of the Department of Munitions and Supply, he was employed in January of 1942 by the Department of Finance, treasury branch, and is nowworking under Mr. F. E. Wood in the accounting section of that department.

This is the first opportunity I have had to give this answer. I think it answers everything my hon. friend mentioned in his speech. I do not know the purpose of the speech, but I wish to say that I try to treat hon. members as courteously as I can, and to give them the information asked for as quickly as possible.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. POULIOT BRUCE COAL COMPANY-EMPLOYMENT OP A. E. BRADFIELD
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

My information was more complete than the minister's.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. POULIOT BRUCE COAL COMPANY-EMPLOYMENT OP A. E. BRADFIELD
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PLEBISCITE ACT

CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE


Hon. N. A. McLARTY (Secretary of State) presented the first report of the special committee appointed to consider Bill No. 10, Trade Agreement* respecting the taking of a plebiscite in every electoral district in Canada and the taking of the votes of such plebiscite of Canadian service voters stationed within, and without Canada, and moved that the report be concurred in. Motion agreed to.


TRADE AGREEMENTS

CHILE, BRAZIL, AND THE ARGENTINE-MOTIONS FOR APPROVAL

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That it is expedient that the Senate and House of Commons do approve the trade agreement between Canada and Chile signed September 10, 1941, and that this house do approve the same.

He said: Mr. Speaker, it will be observed that standing in my name as Secretary of State for External Affairs there are three resolutions similar in terms appearing under government notices of motion to-day. They relate to three countries, namely, Chile, Brazil .and the Argentine. The agreements are between those three countries and Canada.

If the house will give its consent, it might be understood that the discussion on all three resolutions could take place at one and the same time. I do not believe that would confuse matters in any particular; on the contrary in my opinion it would, if anything, clarify them. If necessary I shall ask permission to introduce a special resolution for the purpose, but if it were now understood that consent had been given for discussion of the three resolutions at one and the same time I would waive that formality.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, the request is a reasonable one, to which I believe the house might properly consent. At the moment I see no objection to the procedure suggested. I should like to see a fairly general discussion, because these resolutions involve an important question, despite the fact that the trade in actual dollars and cents may not be relatively large. We are about to consider an important problem, especially in its relation to the postwar period, and, I hope that hon. members will take part in the discussions. It is my Intention to speak briefly myself, after hearing the Minister of Trade and Commerce. I am prepared personally to give consent to the Prime Minister's suggestion.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I thank the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) and other leaders of groups in the house for giving consent to the discussion taking place as indicated.

The other two resolutions are similar in form to the one with reference to Chile. They are as follows:

Resolved that it is expedient that the Senate and House of Commons do approve the trade agreement between Canada and Brazil signed October 17, 1941, and that this house do approve the same.

Resolved that it is expedient that the Senate and House of Commons do approve the trade agreement between Canada and the Argentine Republic signed October 2, 1941, and that this house do approve the same.

The first agreement, namely the one between Canada and Chile, was signed in Chile on September 10, 1941, and has been provisionally in force since October 15, 1941. The trade agreement between Canada and the Argentine Republic was signed at Buenos Aires on October 2, 1941, and has been provisionally in force since November 15 of that year. The trade agreement between Canada and Brazil was signed at Rio de Janiero on October 17, 1941, and has been in force provisionally since October 17, 1941.

The three agreements were tabled in the house at the close of the last session, and the agreements themselves appear in printed form in the Votes and Proceedings of the house for November 3, 1941. It was thought that the latter part of the last session would not be a convenient time to discuss these measures, and for that reason they were left for the approval of parliament until the present time. * Except for the purpose of enabling me to explain the formalities of procedure, it might have been preferable to have the resolutions stand in the name of the Minister of Trade and Commerce, because he is the one who was responsible for their negotiation, and the member of the administration who will explain their terms to the house. However, as the Department of External Affairs is specially charged with matters respecting treaties and agreements, and as it is in that department, that formalities of signing, ratification and the like have to be arranged and completed, it seemed appropriate that I should be the one to present the resolutions.

While the trade agreements have been in force provisionally since the dates I have mentioned, the continuance of their operation requires the approval of both houses of parliament by joint resolution, and subsequent ratification by the Secretary of State for External Affairs. That is the position so far as Canada is concerned. The same would apply in corresponding manner to the administrations in the other countries concerned.

The first question which I know will arise in the minds of some hon. members is as to how it has come about that an agreement

Trade Agreements

has been signed, and is even provisionally in operation, without parliament having had an opportunity of passing upon it in the first instance. That question invariably arises in respect to agreements and treaties that have been entered into before being presented to parliament. The explanation, of course, is that the making of treaties and agreements are executive acts. In the making of treaties and agreements the government must take into account its responsibility to parliament. It must realize that if it is not in a position to obtain the approval of parliament, then it would incur defeat and the penalty of retirement from office.

It would be impossible for public assemblies to discuss agreements between different nations before they were actually signed. Hon. members will appreciate the many questions which develop in connection with the negotiation of any agreement. Negotiations of necessity are carried on among persons appointed for that purpose. This present stage of proceedings therefore is one wherein we seek to receive* the approval of the house and, later, that of the other house, to the three trade agreements as negotiated.

The agreements themselves are all of the nature of agreements affording most-favourednation reciprocal treatment between the countries which have entered into them. They are similar to other agreements of the mostfavoured-nation type which have been entered into in recent years. Four such agreements have been signed recently. One between Canada and Uruguay was approved in the session of 1937. One between Canada and Guatemala was approved in the session of 1938. One with Haiti received approval in the 1938 session, and an agreement with the Dominican republic was approved in the session of 1940. I believe in the case of the first three agreements mentioned this House of Commons proceeded by way of bills. However, with respect to the Dominican republic agreement, the procedure was simply by way of resolution approving the agreement. The reason that no bill is required is that no statute is being amended in any way. All the agreement does is to give most-favourednation treatment by one country on its part to the other, and to ensure that the most-favoured attitude will be reciprocated by the other country. If the agreement did in any way change a statute, of course it would be necessary to proceed by way of a bill. However, in the form in which these agreements are, and having regard to their contents, approval by resolution is all that is necessary.

I had one particular object in mind in taking upon myself the introduction of the

resolutions. It was that I felt that I should like in the name of the government of Canada to express our thanks for their many courtesies to the governments of the several countries in South and Central America which were visited in the fall of last year by the Minister of Trade and Commerce and the trade mission of which he was the head. Hon. members will recall that among the countries which received my hon. friend, the Minister of Trade and Commerce, and his mission, were Ecuador, Peru, Chile, the Argentine, Uruguay and Brazil. In each of these countries the minister and the members of his party were extended exceptional hospitality and received the utmost in the way of cooperation in the furtherance of the object of the mission itself.

In the case of the three republics with which agreements with Canada have been entered into, a definite step forward has been taken in securing the advantages of improved trade relations. At this time of war the actual value in terms of trade may not be considerable, in fact may amount to very little, but there is great value in the fact that the treaties themselves serve to express friendship and goodwill between these particular republics in another part of the western hemisphere and the Dominion of Canada. I have received word from our ministers in the Argentine and Brazil since the establishment of our legations in South America that the trade mission which visited those countries has been greatly appreciated by the citizens. They felt that the mission itself had done a great deal to make Canada and its resources better known, had brought our country more to the fore than it had been at any time in the past. I might add that I have been told the same thing by the Hon. Doctor Pablo Santos Munoz, minister of the Argentine republic and the Hon. J. A. Lins de Barros, minister for Brazil, whom we are pleased to have at Ottawa as the representatives of these countries.

Hon. members will have noticed that the name of the Argentine republic has come before us recently in connection with the protection which is being given Canada's interest in Japan at the present time by that country. I mention this as indicative of the closer relations and cooperation which our country in the last year has come to enjoy with South America.

To-day, when conditions have become so much more serious in all parts of the world and where North and South America have been drawn together to a degree that has never obtained heretofore, it is particularly fortunate that we should have established diplomatic relations with these countries

Trade Agreements

through the legations which they have opened in Ottawa and which we have opened in Brazil, the Argentine and Chile. It is also fortunate that we should have established with these countries at this time of war the foundations for closer trade relations in the post-war era. When the war is over the way will already have been paved' for the immediate development of trade on as large a scale as may be possible. This service will be due in no small measure to the trade mission which my hon. friend, the Minister of Trade and Commerce, headed last fall. The house will, I feel sure, permit me to extend to him the congratulations of its members upon the success of the mission and his leadership of it. If I am not going too far, and from the response apparently I am not, I should also like to extend these congratulations to him on behalf of the government.

The leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) has suggested that if the Minister of Trade and Commerce were at this moment to make his statement, which I have no doubt will be complete, it would lay the foundation for a further discussion of the matter.

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Subtopic:   CHILE, BRAZIL, AND THE ARGENTINE-MOTIONS FOR APPROVAL
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NAT

Howard Charles Green

National Government

Mr. GREEN:

May I ask the Prime Minister what is the situation with regard to the other countries which were visited but with which apparently no treaties have been made?

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Subtopic:   CHILE, BRAZIL, AND THE ARGENTINE-MOTIONS FOR APPROVAL
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am going to leave that to my hon. friend the Minister of Trade and Commerce.

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Subtopic:   CHILE, BRAZIL, AND THE ARGENTINE-MOTIONS FOR APPROVAL
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

At some stage would it not be desirable if the house could go into committee so that hon. members might ask questions? I would not suggest that that be done at this stage, because the minister ought to have a chance to make his statement uninterrupted by questions. But it may be desirable at some stage after those who wish to do so have made extended remarks-I hope they will not be too extended-to have the house go into committee so that there may be opportunity for questions and answers.

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Subtopic:   CHILE, BRAZIL, AND THE ARGENTINE-MOTIONS FOR APPROVAL
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

As my hon. friend is aware, it is not necessary for the house to go into committee of the whole to discuss the resolution, but the house may so decide of its own accord. If it is thought to be opportune, after the minister and other hon. members have spoken in a formal manner, to have discussion in committee of the whole, I am sure that consent will immediately be given for that purpose.

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LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. MacKINNON (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

In officially submitting my report on the first government-sponsored Canadian trade mission to South America, I desire not only to give to the house the actual accomplishments of the mission but to be permitted to go beyond this, and touch briefly on our visit to each country, how and by whom we were received, something of our reception, and a few highlights regarding each country visited. I should like to have gone into these matters more fully than my time will allow, because I am sure that it is tremendously important that Canada discovers South America and learns about the great countries there and the developments that are there taking place.

The success of our trade mission was unique inasmuch as we accomplished' our objective in each country visited. The timing of the visit was fortunate, and for this good judgment the credit goes entirely to the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King).

A word about the personnel of our party. Outstanding, of course, was the Deputy Minister of Trade and Commerce, Mr. L. D. Wilgress, whose reputation for fairness, sincerity and practical knowledge had preceded us. Of Mr. Wilgress I cannot speak too highly. Mr. Yves Lamonitagne, Director of Commercial Relations in my department, was of great strength to the mission, and his inclusion in it, with his bilingualism, made a definite appeal wherever we went. Mr. Escott Reid, of the Department of External Affairs, not only ably represented that department in familiarizing himself with conditions in the various countries visited, but by his tact and courtesy made a definite contribution. The very important and exacting work of secretary of the mission was most capably handled by Mr. A. C. L. Adams.

The objective of the mission was not immediate results, although we hoped to get and are getting these, but rather the laying of the best possible foundations upon which after-the-war trade can be effectively built. It is well known that we could be shipping huge South American requirements now were it not that, most properly of course, the munitions and supplies requirements of our war programme take first place. The matter of shipping also mitigates against our exports to and our imports from South American countries at this time.

The Canadian trade mission which left Ottawa on August 14 last and returned on October 28 was a resumption of the mission commenced in November, 1940, and abandoned because of my illness. Countries visited included Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil, all south of the equator.

Trade Agreements

A short stop was made at Port of Spain, Trinidad, on the return trip following an invitation to the mission from the governor of Trinidad to visit that colony for the purpose of discussing matters pertaining to trade between Canada and several of the West Indian colonies.

The mission's visit had several aims. The general objective was exploratory. We desired to investigate opportunties for the development of reciprocal trade between Canada and the countries visited and, when and where possible, remove obstacles which hindered progress in commercial relations. Powers were conferred upon me by the governor in council enabling me to conclude most-favoured-nation trade agreements, thereby removing or preventing discrimination against Canadian products in respect to tariff matters and exchange control.

An important aspect of the visit was the furtherance of goodwill. The mission found during its tour that in all the countries visited there was the highest regard for Canada and a general desire to strengthen trade relations.

The mission was received with the utmost courtesy on its arrival in each country. We were accorded the greatest hospitality and every possible facility was extended to us.

In each country visited the press devoted very considerable space to the activities of the mission and stressed the character and importance of the visit.

We first visited the countries on the Pacific coast, Ecuador, Peru and Chile, in the order given.

Up to the time of our visit Canada possessed no trade agreements with these countries. A feature of Canada's trade common to all three countries is the fact that over the last decade their balance of trade has been favourable to Canada. The favourable balance for 1940 with the three countries was $2,181,000, and for 1941, $654,000.

Compared with Canada's trade with the world, our trade with the countries on the western coast of South America is small, but the figures assume greater significance to them because their export and import trade is on a considerably smaller scale than ours.

Trade is an exchange of goods, a two-way process, and if we are to continue to sell our products abroad we must be ready to reciprocate. To the extent at least that we can increase our purchases from all the Latin-American countries we shall make it possible for them to increase their purchases from Canada.

It is interesting to note that while the balance of trade between Canada and Argentina and Brazil was favourable to Canada in 1938, it became favourable to these two countries in 1940. The volume of trade in both directions has in fact expanded, which is a satisfactory development. In 1941 Brazil increased its favourable balance but the balance became favourable to Canada in regard to Argentina.

With respect to Uruguay, we find that taking 1939 and 1940 together, our exports and imports from that country are about balanced, whereas in years prior to 1939 the balance of trade has been in Canada's favour. In 1941 the balance was again substantially favourable to this country.

The six countries of South America visited by the mission are inhabited by 75 million people. Brazil has about 45 million inhabitants, Argentina about 13 million, and Chile a population of 5 million. The total population of this group of countries, therefore, is 63 millions or approximately 84 per cent of the total population of the six countries visited.

The total imports of these six countries amounted to an aggregate value of $956,800,000 in United States dollars in 1938, Argentina, Brazil and Chile together accounting for 88 per cent of this total (United States, $838,500,000). This gives an idea of the purchasing power available in these three countries alone. *

The aggregate exports of these six countries were approximately $1,020,000,000 in United States dollars in 1938, the Share of Argentina, Brazil and Chile being 86 per cent of this total (United States, $872,400,000).

In 1938 Canada's exports to the six countries totalled $9,961,000 (in each case United States dollars), of which $8,801,000 or 87 per cent were consigned to Argentina, Brazil and Chile. In 1940 our total exports to the six countries amounted to $14,874,000, of which Canadian exports to Argentina were $6,107,000; to Brazil $5,063,000 and to Chile $1,436,000 or 85 per cent of the total. In 1941 the total was $20,092,000-$7,172,000 to Argentina; $8,097,000 to Brazil and $1,788,000 to Chile, these three countries again taking 85 per cent of the total.

Canada's total imports from the six countries in 1940 amounted to $14,129,000 ($12,960,000 or 92 per cent from Argentina, Brazil and Chile), and in 1941 the total was $28,134,000 of which 87 per cent came from these three countries.

As a matter of reference I would like to put these figures on Hansard in tabular form, if I may have the consent of the house so to do.

Trade Agreements

Population and Trade of Six Countries Visited

Argentina

Brazil

Chile Population (estimated) Imports 1938 U.S.$ 442.600.000 292.700.000 Exports 1938 U.S.$ 437.600.000 296.100.000Ecuador

Uruguay

Peru 10.300.000 48.600.000 59.400.000 11.700.000 58.900.000 77.200.000Total (A) 956,800,000 1,020,200,000First 3 countries.... 838,500,000 872,400,000P.C. of total (A).., 88 per cent 86 per cent

Trade of Canada with the Six Countries Visited-1938 Canadian Dollars

Argentina

Brazil

Chile

Ecuador

Uruguay

Peru

Total (B)...

First 3 countries

Argentina

Brazil

Chile

Ecuador

Uruguay

Peru

Total (C)... First 3 countries P.C. of total (C)

Argentina

Brazil

Chile

Ecuador

Uruguay

Peru

Total (D)...

First 3 countries

P.C. of total (D)

Canadian exports to:

4.675.000

3.522.000

604.000

52,000

216.000

892,000

9,961,000

8,801,000(87%)

6.107.000

5.063.000

1.436.000

131.000

610.000

1.527.000

14,874,000

12,606,000

85 per cent

7.172.000

8.097.000

1.788.000 162,000 931,000

1.942.000

20,092,000

17,057,000 85 per cent

Imports Balance

from: of trade

2,149,000 + 2,526.000769.000 + 2,753,000179.000 + 425.00028,000 + 24.000137,000 + 79.0003,005,000 2,113,0006,267,000 + 3,704,0003,097,000(50%) + 5,704,0006,542,000 435,0006,243,000 - 1.180,000175,000 + 2,261,00026,000 + 105,000431,000 + 179.000712,000 + 815,00014,129,000 + 745,00012,960,000 - 354,00092 per cent 4,764,000 + 2,408,00019,444.000 - 11,347,000233,000 + 1,555,000170,000 - 8,000688,000 + 243,0002,833,000 891,00028,134,000 - 8,042,00024,443,000 - 7,386,000

87 per cent

It is only necessary that the three agreements negotiated with the countries of Chile, Argentina and Brazil be ratified by this house. The arrangement made with Ecuador was what is known as a modus vivendi and is a temporary agreement pending formal treaty. I wish, however, to give this house information in regard to our visit to Ecuador, Peru

and Uruguay in addition to particulars of the three countries with which formal trade agreements were completed.

Having given a summary of the trade position with the South American countries which we visited, I intend now to deal particularly with the situation in each country. En route to Ecuador, sailing from New York

Trade Agreements

and on through the Panama canal, we touched at the Colombian port of Bonaventura but our first formal call was at Guayaquil, the main port of Ecuador. So as to enable us to see something of the country we travelled by rail and motor car from Guayaquil sea level to Quito, the capital, which is at an altitude of some 10,500 feet.

The trip was exceedingly interesting-plantations of pineapples, bananas, coffee and cocoa-and on the higher uplands at altitudes of eight and eleven thousand feet, grain and vegetables.

In our Rockies at this elevation there is of course perpetual ice and snow, but we were almost on the equator and in the territory of the great Inca empire of pre-Columbus days. Thousands and thousands of Indians in their colourful costumes tended the crops of, in many cases, the absentee landlords. Quito for the tourist with its ancient civilization is most interesting. Churches and other buildings erected shortly after Columbus' discovery are still giving service.

The morning after our arrival we paid our official call on the president and met the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Doctor Julio Tobar Conoso, and the Ministers of Agriculture and Finance, with their officials. Arrangements were made for us to have immediate conversations in regard to a possible trade treaty.

Because Ecuador's balance of trade with Canada was unfavourable to Ecuador, that country had imposed,, in 1936, a surtax of 50 per cent on imports from Canada. This had the effect of immediately reducing the value of Canada's exports to Ecuador by one-half, and we were anxious to rectify this position.

The itinerary allowed the mission but one day in Quito, the capital, but negotiations resulted in an arrangement being made under an exchange of notes which not only removed the existing surtax, but, by placing the trade between Canada and Ecuador on the basis of most-favoured-nation treatment, extended to Canada the benefit of reductions of duties on Ecuador's minimum tariff which had been granted to the United States, under a trade agreement signed in 1938 and which affected thirty-three tariff items, the most important of which was flour.

Ecuador imports about 250.000 barrels of flour annually. In 1936, Canadian flour exports to Ecuador amounted to 18,452 barrels valued at $98,723, and since that year, because of the surtax, there have been no exports of Canadian flour to Ecuador up to October, 1941. In November and December, immediately after our visit, over one thousand

barrels of flour have been exported to Ecuador. Our flour trade is in this way now being reestablished.

In 1940 Canada exported to Ecuador goods valued at $130,721 while our imports from Ecuador amounted to $25,676 only.

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Subtopic:   CHILE, BRAZIL, AND THE ARGENTINE-MOTIONS FOR APPROVAL
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Relatively very small.

Topic:   TRADE AGREEMENTS
Subtopic:   CHILE, BRAZIL, AND THE ARGENTINE-MOTIONS FOR APPROVAL
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February 27, 1942