February 25, 1942

JAPANESE NATIONALS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

IND

Mr. NEILL:

Independent

1. Did the government, on January 14, last, issue a statement of policy regarding Japanese in British Columbia?

2. Did one of the items state that Japanese nationals will be forbidden to possess or use short wave radio receiving sets, radio transmitters and cameras?

3. Was such prohibition enforced by order in council, and, if so, what was the number of such order?

4. Were instructions given to any military or police authorities to enforce the said order in council?

5. If so, ivhen and to whom ?

6. How many of the receiving sets, transmitters and cameras have been surrendered or seized up to date?

7. Why was the restriction confined to Japanese nationals and not extended to those born in Japan and since 1922 naturalized in Canada?

Mr. ST. LAURENT:

1. Yes.

2. Yes.

3. Order-in-council P.C. 365 January 15, 1942, gives the minister the power to make such prohibition from time to time, and he has made an order dated February 5, 1942.

4. Yes.

5. February 5, 1942. Commissioner, R.C.M. Police.

6. No information as yet.

7. The restriction is not now confined to Japanese nationals.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   JAPANESE NATIONALS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
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PENITENTIARIES COMMISSION

NAT

Mr. CHURCH:

National Government

1. When was the royal commission on prisons appointed, and who were i.ts members?

2. What was the total cost of this commission, including fees, salaries, travelling expenses and all other emoluments?

3. When was the report received?

4. Have any of its recommendations been carried out?

5. When will the penitentiary commission be appointed ?

6. What is the reason for the delay?

7. Who are the present chief heads operating this branch of the service, and what training have they for work of this nature?

8. Will consideration be given to giving effect to the Borstal system?

Mr. ST. LAURENT:

1. February 27, 1936. Hon. Mr. Justice Joseph Archambault, R. W. Craig, K.C., J. C. McRuer, K.C.

2. $108,719.70.

3. Tabled June 14, 1938.

4. Yes.

5. This involves a question of policy.

6. See answer to question 5.

7. (a) P. M. Anderson, K.C., senior advisory counsel, acting for the deputy minister of justice with respect to penitentiary matters. Mr. Anderson has been so acting for the last four years.

(b) Acting Superintendent G. L. Sauvant, Bachelor of Arts, university of Montreal; translator and proof reader, 1915, clerk of the crown in chancery; war service with French forces, graduate of St. Cyr Military Academy, wounded, 1917, served as interpreter during convalescence, instructor in bayonet fighting and grenade throwing; appointed second lieutenant in March, 1919; decorations, Croix de Guerre, Verdun medal; agent for Dominion Publishing Company; contributor to Revue Jeanne d'Arc of Ottawa; appointed instructor in French at Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario, 1924; appointed librarian school teacher, St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary, March 5, 1928, to November 19, 1929; promoted warden's clerk, 1st August, 1929; promoted inspector of penitentiaries, July 16, 1934; sent to St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary as acting warden, October 1, 1937; appointed acting superintendent of penitentiaries, July 27, 1938; (Coronation medal).

(c) Inspector E. L. O'Leary, O.A.S.: education received at Richibucto, N.B., and St. Dunstan's college, Charlottetown (commercial course); 1910-13, Royal Bank of Canada; 1914, bookkeeper, R. Sullivan & Co., St. John, N.B.; 1914-19, with C.E.F. and R.A.F.; granted commission C.F.A., 1916, awarded military cross, 1918; 1920-23, with Soldier Settlement Board in Edmonton; 1923-27, accountant with Abitibi Power and Paper Co.; 1927, assistant paymaster with Lake St. John Power and Paper Co. Ltd.; 1928, office manager, power plant, with P. Lyall and Sons Construction Co. Ltd.; 1930-32, chief accountant, Seigniory Club, Quebec; 1933, accountant, Watson Jack & Co. Ltd.; 1934, accountant, Benzolene Corp. Ltd.; 1935, appointed inspector of penitentiaries; 1940, granted leave of absence, without pay, for purpose of enlistment in Royal Canadian Air Force.

(d) Inspector G. E. Shortt: Bachelor of Arts (Queen's); B.L.S. (McGill); Ph.D. (university of Michigan, Ann Arbor); 1915-17, service with C.E.F. conducting officer, troop transports, north Atlantic; 1917-18 English civil service (seed oat control, England and Wales); three years business administration, including two years as executive General Motors Acceptance Corporation; five and one-half years, investigator under Combines Investigation Act; one year with royal commission to investigate the penal system of

Questions

Canada (conferences with leading prison administrators and .investigation of foreign prisons); appointed inspector and auditor of penitentiaries, July 13, 1938; Canadian civil service employment 15 years.

S. This involves a question of policy.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARIES COMMISSION
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LIB

Robert Wellington Mayhew

Liberal

Mr. MAYHEW:

Which, if any, of the recommendations of the royal commission on the penal system of Canada in its report of April, 1938, have already been, or are about to be, acted upon?

Mr. ST. LAURENT:

1. (a) A convict at present earns remission as from the date of admission instead of the seventh month of sentence as was the case previously.

(b) Remission is now allowed for holidays and also for periods of sickness.

(c) For purposes of remission, overlapping terms are considered as one.

2. A thorough inspection of penitentiary industries has been made.

3. Shaving and bathing of convicts have been made more frequent.

4. In each case recommended by wardens, convicts who are to be rearrested on discharge, or deported, have been allowed their remuneration earned during their sentences.

5. Arrangements are being made to have some penitentiary farm vegetables canned commercially for own use.

Kingston

St. Vincent de Paul

Dorchester

Manitoba

British Columbia. .

Saskatchewan

Collin's Bay

6. Wardens are now more fully consulted with regard to the advisability of improvements in connection with their work.

7. More liberal visiting and writing privileges have been accorded to deserving convicts.

8. Improved cell lighting has been installed wherever possible.

9. Kitchens have been renovated and special ranges installed in practically every institution. Cleanliness and preparation of food are receiving careful attention.

10. Contributions of convicts to the radio entertainment fund have been discontinued.

11. In several penitentiaries, young convicts are now trained in the motor mechanic trade, notwithstanding that they are. still segregated from adult class. In one institution, a new shoe shop has been opened and young convicts only are employed therein.

12. Practically all vegetables required in the penitentiary service are now produced on the penitentiary farms. Surpluses of over one million pounds were diverted to army and other government departments in 1941.

13. A dairy herd has been established in one of the penitentiaries not previously so equipped.

14. Wardens were authorized to use waste material for demonstrational purposes in convict training.

15. Many more officers have been made permanent within the limitations placed by the treasury board:

1938-39 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 Total30 20 Nil ' Nil 5039 15 Nil Nil 5426 11 Nil Nil 3715 15 Nil Nil 3027 13 Nil Nil 4010 20 Nil Nil 3024 15 Nil Nil 39171 109 28016. Certain officers were selected to proceed, to the training school, Wakefield, England, for a course of instruction. The first draft proceeded in 1939, but subsequent drafts were cancelled in September of the same year on account of the war.17. Poultry raising has been started in one penitentiary.18. Convicts are provided with lighters; convicts pay for flints only.19. More convicts are being employed in industrial labour.20. Officers' private cars now may be repaired by convict labour.

fMr. St. Laurent 1

21. More schooling is provided for young convicts at St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary.

22. Recommendations regarding the keeping of stores have been followed as far as possible and are the general practice to be observed in the future.

23. Authority for expenditures by wardens has been increased, thereby reducing the number of requests and correspondence for minor expenditures of maintenance and other routine matters.

24. In several penitentiaries, showers have been installed in the cell blocks.

Questions

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARIES COMMISSION
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INCOME WAR TAX ACT-APPEALS

NAT

Mr. STOKES:

National Government

1. How many appeals from assessment under the Income War Tax Act were made (a) by corporations, (b) by individuals, during each of the fiscal years ending March 31, 1939, 1940 and 1941?

2. How many of such appeals were determined personally by the Minister of National Revenue?

3. How many of such appeals were determined by the commissioner of income tax or by other official pursuant to authority purported to be vested in such official by the minister?

4. How many of such appeals are still pending?

5. How many of such appeals were determined in favour of (a) the appellant, (b) the crown?

6. In how many cases did the appellant serve notice of dissatisfaction with the decision and appeal to the exchequer court?

7. How many of such eases were determined by the exchequer court in favour of (a) the appellant, (b) the crown?

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INCOME WAR TAX ACT-APPEALS
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LIB

Mr. GIBSON: (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

1. (a) 1939, 163; 1940, 176; 1941, 137.

(b) 1939, 175; 1940, 146; 1941, 149.

2. No records available.

3. No records available.

4. (a) 1939, 7; 1940, IS; 1941, 43. (b) 1939,. 15; 1940, 15; 1941, 49.

5. (a) Corporations: 1939, 65; 1940, 43;

1941, 26. Individuals: 1939, 70; 1940, 40; 1941, 31. (b) Corporations: 1939, 91; 1940,

115; 1941, 68. Individuals: 1939, 90; 1940, 91; 1941, 69.

6. Corporations: 1939, 5.

7. (a) 1; (b) 4.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INCOME WAR TAX ACT-APPEALS
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DEFENCE OF CANADA REGULATIONS-INTERNMENTS

NAT

Mr. STOKES:

National Government

1. How many advisory committees have been appointed under regulation 22 of the defence of Canada regulations?

2. What are the names of the members of each such committee?

3. When was each such committee appointed?

4. How many objections to internment have been heard by each such committee?

5. In how many cases has each committee recommended (a) the release of an internee, (b) the continued detention of an internee?

Mr. ST. LAURENT:

1. Under regulation 22 of the defence of Canada regulations (consolidation), 1941-two.

2. (1) Daniel O'Connell, K.C., former county court judge; Robert Taschereau, K.C., William M. Dickson.

(2) His Honour Judge J. C. A. Cameron, Arthur Gagne, K.C., Robert Forsyth, K.C.

3. (1) June 26, 1941. (2) July 14, 1941.

4. (1) 83. (2) 136.

5. (1) (a) 43 releases; (b) 40 continued detention.

(2) (a) 76 releases; (b) 60 continued

detention.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEFENCE OF CANADA REGULATIONS-INTERNMENTS
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BUREAU OF PUBLIC INFORMATION-TOURIST AND TRAVEL BUREAUX

LIB

Mr. ISNOR:

Liberal

1. What salary, remuneration or allowance do members of the tourist development committee receive from any department of the government?

2. Wliat members of the tourist development committee, bureau of public information or Canadian travel bureau hail from the maritime provinces?

3. What is the scope of authority of the bureau of public information?

4. Does the said bureau deal with naval and military matters?

5. If so, in what manner?

6. How does the bureau distribute its material?

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUREAU OF PUBLIC INFORMATION-TOURIST AND TRAVEL BUREAUX
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LIB

Mr. THORSON: (Minister of National War Services)

Liberal

1. None.

2. (a) None; largely an interdepartmental committee. WTe have no record of the birthplace of members of the committee; representation thereon is not on a geographical basis.

(b) Miss Muriel Ann Mosley, secretary to the director of public information; Mr. E. A. Corbett, speakers' division, public information.

(c) Mr. D. Leo Dolan, chief, Canadian travel bureau. Mr. H. A. McCallum, assistant chief, Canadian travel bureau.

3. To collect and disseminate to the public, information concerning the various phases of the war effort of the Canadian people and the

' activities of the government in relation thereto, and generally to coordinate the existing public information services of the government and originate or employ other means in order that the same may be used in the most efficient way for the obtaining of the utmost aid from the people of Canada in the national emergency which has arisen.

4. Only to the extent of distributing material provided by those departments and the printing of booklets and posters specifically requested by them.

5. See answer to No. 4.

6. Through the news services; photographic services; press gallery; by direct mail; through clubs, societies and other organizations; members of parliament; by radio and on the motion picture screen. Poster material is distributed through factories, firms, government offices and individuals, et cetera.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUREAU OF PUBLIC INFORMATION-TOURIST AND TRAVEL BUREAUX
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*LANCASTER MILITARY HOSPITAL-WEST ST. JOHN

NAT

Mr. HATFIELD:

National Government

1. What were the names of all employees, including medical and clerical staff, of Lancaster hospital, West Saint John, from the year 1919 to the year 1941?

2. What were their salaries per year and what were theiir pensions per year from 1919 to 1941?

Questions

3. Were any of these employees supplied with automobiles by the government? If so, how many and what are their names?

4. What were the prices of these automobiles?

5. What year were such automobiles purchased ?

6. What was the cost of operating these ears from the date of purchase to the year 1941?

7. What year was Lancaster hospital opened as a military hospital?

8. What was the total cost of the Lancaster hospital since its opening as a military hospital to the year 1941?

9. What was the cost of all repairs to Lancaster hospital since its opening as a military hospital to the year 1941?

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   *LANCASTER MILITARY HOSPITAL-WEST ST. JOHN
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

The other day I informed my hon. friend that some of this information was not available. If he will consult me or some of my officers, we shall be glad to make available What information we have.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   *LANCASTER MILITARY HOSPITAL-WEST ST. JOHN
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

It was a question of lessening the time. I undertook to see the hon. member but did not. The question can stand in the meantime.

Question stands.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   *LANCASTER MILITARY HOSPITAL-WEST ST. JOHN
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SUCCESSION DUTY

CON

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What is the total amount of succession duty under the Dominion Succession Duty Act that has been (a) assessed, (h) collected since the said act was assented to on the 14th of June, 1941?

2. How many persons deceased since the said date have left estates with a gross valuation of $500,000 or over?

3. (a) What were the names and addresses of such persons; (b) what was the aggregate value of, and amount of succession duty assessed or levied against each of said estates?

Mr. GIBSON;

1. (a) $477,218.40. (b) $3,836,890.64 as at

January 31, 1942.

2. Records not available because of six months period for filing after the death of deceased; however, the number filed is 17.

3. It is not deemed in the .public interest to give the individual particulars requested in this question.

Topic:   * QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SUCCESSION DUTY
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EAST AND WEST BLOCKS, OTTAWA-FIRE PROTECTION

February 25, 1942