February 19, 1942

SPEED OF DELIVERY TO OVERSEAS TROOPS AND POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Herbert Alexander Bruce

National Government

Hon. H. A. BRUCE (Parkdale):

I would

ask the Postmaster General, with respect to the sending of airgraph letters overseas, first, whether his department has been able to ascertain the length of time it takes on the average for letters mailed in Canada to reach the troops overseas; and, second, whether this same airgraph service is being extended to the troops overseas so that they may send airgraph letters home to Canada.

Topic:   AIRGRAPH SERVICE
Subtopic:   SPEED OF DELIVERY TO OVERSEAS TROOPS AND POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION
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LIB

William Pate Mulock (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. W. P. MULOCK (Postmaster General) :

The hon. member for Parkdale was

kind enough to advise me in advance that he intended to ask for this information to-day. In reply to his first question, the shortest time is five days and the average is twelve days, which time will doubtless be materially reduced when climatic conditions are more favourable. In reply to his second question, the United Kingdom and Canadian postal administrations have already studied the establishment of a return airgraph service. Inauguration depends on the establishment of a regular, direct airplane service of reasonable frequency from the United Kingdom to Canada.

Topic:   AIRGRAPH SERVICE
Subtopic:   SPEED OF DELIVERY TO OVERSEAS TROOPS AND POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

Has any consideration

been given to the extension of the airgraph service to our men serving in the middle east? If not, will the minister give it consideration? I had an inquiry regarding that in to-day's mail.

Topic:   AIRGRAPH SERVICE
Subtopic:   SPEED OF DELIVERY TO OVERSEAS TROOPS AND POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION
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LIB

William Pate Mulock (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. MULOCK:

Does the hon. member

mean service from England to the middle east, or from Canada?

Topic:   AIRGRAPH SERVICE
Subtopic:   SPEED OF DELIVERY TO OVERSEAS TROOPS AND POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

From Canada.

.

Topic:   AIRGRAPH SERVICE
Subtopic:   SPEED OF DELIVERY TO OVERSEAS TROOPS AND POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION
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LIB

William Pate Mulock (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. MULOCK:

I shall be glad to obtain

the information and give the hon. member an answer in the course of the next day or so.

Topic:   AIRGRAPH SERVICE
Subtopic:   SPEED OF DELIVERY TO OVERSEAS TROOPS AND POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION
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PETITION

REQUEST FOR INTERNMENT OF JAPANESE ADULTS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Robert Wellington Mayhew

Liberal

Mr. R. W. MAYHEW (Victoria, B.C.):

Mr. Speaker, I have in my hand a petition signed by 1,100 residents of the municipality of Saanich which I ask permission to lay on the table at this time. Saanich is in the county of Nanaimo, and as the representative for that district is at present serving overseas,

I am laying this petition on the table in his behalf. I shall not read the whole petition but just the substance of the prayer, namely:

We therefore do earnestly petition the government of the Dominion of Canada to take immediate steps to eliminate all possibility of subversive acts by the resident Japanese in this province.

Topic:   PETITION
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR INTERNMENT OF JAPANESE ADULTS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
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GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY


The house resumed from Wednesday, February 18, consideration of the motion of Mr. Alphonse Fournier for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the amendment thereto of Mr. Hanson (York-Sunbury), and the amendment to the amendment of Mr. Pouliot.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, with respect to the amendment to the amendment which has been moved by the hon. member for Temis-couata (Mr. Pouliot) I should like to ask whether Your Honour has considered whether the amendment to the amendment is in order. I respectfully submit that it is not in order inasmuch as it deals with a future contingency with respect to which it is impossible for any final opinion to be pronounced at the present time.

First of all I would point out to hon. members that, as they are well aware, while an amendment may deal with three or four different subjects it has to be considered as a whole, and if any one part of it is out of order the amendment as a whole would necessarily be declared out of order. The amendment to the amendment is couched in language which in part would read: Your Excellency's advisers are contemplating, with regard to conscription of man-power for overseas service, a reversal of policy which is uncalled for, untimely and detrimental to the defence of Canada.

The Address-Point oj Order

How can any hon. member say what the ministry is contemplating, and contemplating with respect to a situation that may or may not arise in the future? I should like to ask whether an amendment on the following lines would not perhaps be in accord with what hon. gentlemen opposite who are smiling at the moment have not been saying right along: That the ministry are contemplating, with regard to conscription of man-power for overseas service, a continuation of the policy which has been in existence since this parliament came into being. An amendment setting forth either point of view as to what is in contemplation by the ministry would, I submit, be out of order, inasmuch as it would relate to some future action by the government which cannot be decided at the present time, and which, as has frequently been said from this side of the house, if the government is given a free hand to deal with the important matters to which this particular amendment relates, will be decided in the light of all the circumstances as they exist.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Mr. Speaker, I thank the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) for his remarks, but I regret that he has said that this subamendment has been moved for political motives. Here, sir, is the definition of the word "contemplate" in the house copy of the Oxjord Dictionary which I have just taken from the table:

Contemplate. . . . Gaze upon; view mentally; expect; intend, purpose; meditate. So Contemplation . . . (templum temple, open space for observation).

Now, no one besides the members of the cabinet knows what happens behind closed doors in the east block. But here, sir, is the speech from the throne which I hold in my hand and which contains the following paragraph, as reported in Hansard of this year, page 4:

My ministers accordingly will seek, from the people, by means of a plebiscite, release from any obligation arising out of any past commitments restricting the methods of raising men for military service.

The words "overseas conscription" are not mentioned in that paragraph. But let us see the wording of the amendment. The first paragraph reads thus:

This house regrets that Your Excellency's advisers are contemplating, with regard to conscription of man-power for overseas service, a reversal of policy which is uncalled for, . . .

The only difference between the wording of the amendment and the wording of the speech from the throne is that in the amendment the word "overseas" is included. On the other hand, if you take the warding of the speech from ithe throne, one article of the programme of the government is to seek release from any obligation arising out of any past commitments restricting the methods of raising men for military service. Very well; I believe that the amendment, which was very carefully drafted, is in line with the speech from the throne, and I will further submit that, technically, the Prime Minister can say that no one knows whait the government contemplate, but when the government come with a programme for the whole session, and when an article of that programme is to relieve the government of all restrictions concerning military service, it seems to me that it is perfectly in order 'to move an amendment with the wording of the one I have had the honour to move. I rely upon you, sir, and your knowledge-which is much greater than mine-of the English language, and your knowledge and experience of the rules and practice of this house, to render an unbiased decision. It is a matter which becomes purely legal. The whole thing is to decide whether

The Address-Point of Order

the speech from the throne indicates that the government is contemplating a change, whatever it is, regarding military service in this oountry. I leave the matter in your hands to decide whether the subamendment is in order or not.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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NAT

George Black

National Government

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

Might I, with all respect to the Prime Minister, ask him if he can give the house some precedent or ruling as to whether or not the amendment to the amendment is out of order. Has the question not come previously before this house or another' house?

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Well, I have not precedents at hand. I have no doubt that many could be found and cited. I can only say to my hon. friend that I think anyone familiar with the rules of the house with respect to amendments will agree that the point of view I have taken accords with the rules of the house as they are laid down with respect to motions in debate.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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February 19, 1942