November 13, 1941

ALASKA HIGHWAY COMMISSION

TABLING OF REPORT ON PROPOSED HIGHWAY BETWEEN UNITED STATES PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND ALASKA VIA BRITISH COLUMBIA AND THE YUKON

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I lay on the table the report of the British Columbia-Yukon-Alaska Highway commission, together with the evidence.

I have a statement of the main features of the report. It might be of interest to the house to have that statement on record. If it is agreeable I ask that it be placed on Hansard. It simply sets forth the main features of the report.

Report of British Columbia-Yukon-Alaska Highway Commission (Canada)

This commission was appointed by order in council of December 22, 1938. It was instructed to inquire into the engineering, economic, financial and other aspects of a proposed highway to connect the Pacific Northwest of the United States with Alaska by way of British Columbia and the Yukon.

This project had been under consideration by various official and unofficial bodies in Canada and the United States for some twelve

Alaska Highimy Commission

years or more, and reports had been made by a United States commission in 1933 and by a Canadian interdepartmental committee in 1938. This latter report was not published. In 1938 representations were made to the Canadian government by the government of the United States with regard to the desirability of providing for the construction of such a highway, and the Canadian government was informed that the president of the United States had appointed a commission of five members ''to cooperate and communicate directly with any similar agency which may be appointed in the dominion of Canada in a study for the survey, location and construction of a highway to connect the Pacific northwest part of continental United States with British Columbia and the Yukon Territory in the Dominion of Canada and the Territory of Alaska."

In the spirit of these instructions to the United States commission by the president, the Canadian commission which also consisted of five members, was instructed by the Canadian government "To meet for the purpose of discussion and exchange of information with the United States commission appointed for that purpose."

The Canadian commission, which consists of the Hon. Charles Stewart, Major General Thomas L. Tremblay, Mr. J. M. Wardle of the Department of Mines and Resources, Mr. Arthur Dixon of the Department of Public Works of British Columbia and Mr. J. W. Spencer of Victoria, with Mr. Stewart as chairman, held a series of public meetings in British Columbia and the Yukon in the summer of 1939, and, under its direction, reconnaissance surveys were carried out by the dominion and provincial engineers, both by air and on the ground.

The substance of these hearings and surveys was communicated to the government in a preliminary report in April, 1940. The commission at that time felt that further ground work by engineers would be necessary before it would be in a position to give a reasoned opinion on the respective merits of different routes that had been proposed for a highway. These additional surveys were carried out in the summer of 1940, and when the reports of the engineers had been received the commission proceeded to consider and digest all the available information. It also, in accordance with the instructions of the order in council, held meetings from time to time with the members of the United States commission, and discussed with them various problems arising out of their respective investigations.

The commission, having completed its investigation and deliberations, prepared for the information of the government of Canada the very comprehensive report which has now been tabled. This report, after surveying the results of previous inquiries, and summarizing the evidence obtained at the public hearings, describes in detail the various routes investigated by the commission, and analyses the information collected on the natural resources of the regions traversed by various proposed routes, the character of the country, its climate, snowfall, and so forth.

The commission has embodied in its report a great deal of relevant data, including estimates of costs. The commission itself reports that either of the two main routes investigated, known as the "A" and "B" routes, is practicable from an engineering point of view. It is understood that the United States commission concurs in this conclusion.

These routes, the former nearer the sea and the latter nearer the mountains, are shown on the map accompanying the commission's report. The "A" route runs roughly from the vicinity of Fort St. James, in northern British Columbia, and by way of Atlin. near the British Columbia-Yukon border to Whitehorse, and from there to the Alaskan boundary. The "B" route from Prince George extends north through what is known as the Rocky Mountain Trench to Liard River and down the valley of the Pelly to the Yukon and from there to Dawson and the Alaskan boundary. The commission, after balancing the advantages and disadvantages of each route, concludes that the "B" route would best fulfil the purposes of the proposed highway.

In its consideration of the proposed highway the commission has assumed that the existing roads of British Columbia from the international boundary north to Prince George and Fort St. James would form part of the highway whatever route might be adopted, and confines its consideration of these existing roads to an estimate of the cost of bringing them up to the suggested standard of the highway.

The commission finds that the length of the highway from Vancouver to the Alaskan boundary would vary from about 1,700 miles to about 1,900 miles according to the route adopted.

The commission estimates the cost of a highway completed to the required standard, but exclusive of paving, at from $25,000,000 to $30,000,000, but as these figures are based upon reconnaissance surveys they are only approximate. The "B" route would be somewhat shorter than the "A" route and would cost less both to construct and to maintain.

The commission expresses its appreciation of the cordial cooperation of the government of British Columbia in placing all relevant maps and engineering data at its disposal and in authorizing at considerable expense additional field surveys by its engineers.

PRIVILEGE-Mr. GILLIS

Topic:   ALASKA HIGHWAY COMMISSION
Subtopic:   TABLING OF REPORT ON PROPOSED HIGHWAY BETWEEN UNITED STATES PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND ALASKA VIA BRITISH COLUMBIA AND THE YUKON
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REFERENCE TO ARTICLE IN MONTREAL "GAZETTE" OF NOVEMBER 12

CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CLARENCE GILLIS (Cape Breton South):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of

privilege. In the Montreal Gazette of Wednesday, November 12, in the column written by Mr. F. C. Mears, the Gazette's parliamentary correspondent, the following statement appears:

Labour has its mouthpieces in the house, Angus Maclnnis and Clarence Gillis. The latter yesterday in the house sought to tell fellow-members that there would be trouble in the mining area if labour's demands were not heeded. Then he coolly informed them that he foretold to them what happened in Cape Breton. But Gillis was not just an innocent onlooker of the disruption of coal production in Nova Scotia. It wasn't that he feared there would be trouble down there; he was closely associated with those who caused the trouble.

But how long is the government of Canada to submit to the humiliation of having to listen to people who would have the world believe they are just onlookers, even shocked at what is happening, or assuming the role of the prophet and seer and telling fellow-Canadians they told them so.

Privilege-Mr. Gillis

I strongly resent the insinuations contained in this article, and I think the correspondent has violated his parliamentary privileges in classifying the elected representatives of the people as mouthpieces, a term which in the public mind is associated with those who specialize in the defence of criminals. I want to state emphatically that I am the mouthpiece of no one in this house. I am the elected representative of a constituency that is largely labour, and at all times I endeavour to represent my people as best I may.

With reference to the insinuation that I was a party to organizing the disruption of the mining industry of Nova Scotia, I should like to point out to the Gazette and its correspondent that this dispute was going on for two and a half months while I was attending the sittings of this house in Ottawa. Therefore I desire to make it publicly known that I had much less to do with those responsible for the slow-down in Nova Scotia than the newspaper for which the gentleman in question is writing had to do with some of the financial interests who have been responsible for the economic conditions that bring about labour disputes which to date have frequently disrupted industrial relations in Canada. It ill behooves any man who has already sold his pen to the financial jackals of St. James street to refer to any of his majesty's elected representatives as mouthpieces.

Topic:   REFERENCE TO ARTICLE IN MONTREAL "GAZETTE" OF NOVEMBER 12
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   REFERENCE TO ARTICLE IN MONTREAL "GAZETTE" OF NOVEMBER 12
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

I am answering the insinuations contained in this article; and the language I am using is exactly the sort of language used by the writer of this article, who has referred to his majesty's elected representatives as mouthpieces.

In the last paragraph the writer in effect recommends to the government the suppression of any minority opinions in the house and he who thinks along these lines is not too far removed from Hitler. We endeavour to avoid industrial disputes by pointing out to the government the economic injustices that exist

among the common people. We do not set ourselves up as prophets or seers. We represent the broad masses of the people, with whom we are closely in touch in their every-day life. We intend to continue to expose the manipulations of the financiers and industrialists of this country who, if allowed, will travel the same road that was travelled by the ruling classes of other countries who are responsible for Hitler's domination of Europe to-day. If trouble develops at Kirkland Lake it will not be the responsibility of the common people in that area, but the responsibility of a small group of profit-mad mining magnates who place profits above patriotism at this time.

Topic:   REFERENCE TO ARTICLE IN MONTREAL "GAZETTE" OF NOVEMBER 12
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


POSTPONEMENT OF MILITARY SERVICE

CCF

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. How many persons have been granted postponement of services under the Department of National War Services in each province?

2. How many conscientious objectors, other than Doukhobors and Mennonites, have been granted postponements in each military district?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POSTPONEMENT OF MILITARY SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS
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LIB

Joseph Thorarinn Thorson (Minister of National War Services)

Liberal

Mr. THORSON:

Statement showing by provinces the number of men whose military training has been postponed

(Not including conscientious objectors)

Province No. of Men

Ontario 9,071

Quebec 14,804

Nova Scotia 1,286

New Brunswick 1,418

P.E.1 217

Manitoba 1,743

British Columbia 3,303

Saskatchewan 1,180

Alberta 2,020

Total 35,042

Number of Conscientious Objectors, Other than Mennonites and Doukhobors, who have been Granted Postponement of Military Training in Each Division

Administrative Divisions

Period A B C D E F G H i J Iv M N Total2.... 3 3 4 i i i 28 37 783.... i 72 21 34 1284. .. . 8 8 11 6 335.... i 5 8 1 156. .. . 1 5 67.... 12 i 17 2 si 838. ... 4 i3 4 4 259... . 1 i 210.... i 1 5 1 8Totals. 16 15 6 1 13 1 l l 5 113 77 129 378

Questions

BUTTER AND MILK PRICES*

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POSTPONEMENT OF MILITARY SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS
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LIB

Mr. LECLERC:

Liberal

1. Is it the intention of the government to set a minimum price for butter this month and during the winter season?

2. Will the government control the price of milk in the different municipalities?

3. If so, will the winter price be fixed soon?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POSTPONEMENT OF MILITARY SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

This is a question as to the intention of the government, having to do with a mater of policy. I am not sure whether it is a matter with which I should deal or with which the Minister of Agriculture should deal, but in any event I think there could be only one answer, that the intention of the government will have to be made known in due course.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POSTPONEMENT OF MILITARY SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS
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OIL CONTROLLER

SC

Mr. FAIR:

Social Credit

1. What is the name of the oil controller?

2. What position or positions did he hold at the time of his appointment?

3. Is he a shareholder in any oil or other company?

4. If so, what company or companies?

5. What remuneration does he receive as controller?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   OIL CONTROLLER
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. George R. Cottrelle.

2. President, Western Canada Flour Mills. Maple Leaf Gardens. Sawyer-Massey Limited of Hamilton. Director, Canadian Bank of Commerce. Asbestos Corporation, Limited. Foster Wheeler, Limited.

3. Mr. Cottrelle is not now, and never has, been a shareholder in any oil company. No information on Mr. Cottrelle's investments in other companies.

4. Answered by 3.

5. No remuneration. Mr. Cottrelle receives actual out of pocket expenses incurred in his duties as oil controller.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   OIL CONTROLLER
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SALVAGE CAMPAIGN

SC

Mr. JOHNSTON (Bow River):

Social Credit

1. What are the names, addresses and occupations of the six salvage campaign organizers?

2. How much is paid salvage organizers as,

(a) per diem allowance, (b) travelling allowance, (c) remuneration other than salary?

3. Are any others employed in connection with salvage campaigns?

4. If so, who are they and what are they paid in, (a) salary, (b) per diem allowance, (c) travelling expenses, (d) other form of remuneration?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SALVAGE CAMPAIGN
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LIB

Mr. THORSON: (Minister of National War Services)

Liberal

1. Name Address Occupation

Roger Charbonneau 7396 St. Denis Street, Montreal,

P Q Insurance agent, Confederation

Life.

B. A. Cox 238 St. Clements Avenue,

Toronto, Ont Hydro Electric Power Commission (Accounting department).

G. II. Hummel Nokomis, Sask Farmer.

J. 0. Laird 1252 Victoria Avenue, Windsor,

Ont District representative, London

Life Insurance Co.

Andrew Sheline 902-18th Avenue West, Calgary,

Alta Auctioneer, Calgary.

H. N. M. Stanbury Room 69, 71 Spring Garden

Road, Halifax, N.S Last position - manager of

Canadian Permanent Mortgage Corporation and the Canada Permanent Trust Company.

2. (a) Nil.

(b) Nil; out-of-pocket travelling expenses, paid according to travelling regulations, authorized by order in council.

(c) Nil.

3. Yes; at departmental headquarters, Ottawa.

Questions as Orders for Returns

Salary

4. (a) Name Position

William Knightley Director. (Supervisor of stores

and plant, Department of Transport, seconded to Department of National War

Services) S3,720 per annum.

J. F. McCallum Assistant to the director $3,120 per annum.H. S. Athey, C.P.A Accountant and statistician... $2,880 per annum.A. A. Pariseau Clerk, grade 4 $1,620 per annum (plus cost of

living bonus).

Mrs. E. F. Scrim Stenographer, grade 2 $1,080 per annum (plus cost of

living bonus).

Mrs. K. Bresee Stenographer, grade 2 $1,080 per annum (plus cost of

living bonus).

Mrs. P. Liston Stenographer, grade 1 $720 per annum.... . living bonus).Miss Agnes Heidgerken... Stenographer, grade 1 $780 per annum... living bonus).(b) Nil.(c) Out-of-pocket travelling expenses, paid according to travelling regulations, authorized by order in council.(d) Nil.

(plus cost of (plus cost of

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SALVAGE CAMPAIGN
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November 13, 1941