May 26, 1941

NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Take the increase in the exports to the United States; is that raw fish, or processed fish, or cured fish, or what?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

It is processed fish. It is frozen fish.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Chilled?

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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

Chilled, and frozen; but mostly frozen. It is pretty hard to place chilled fish with the exception of lobster, on the United States market. It is mostly fish treated by the modern process called "quick freezing".

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Fillets, or whole fish?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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LIB
NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Altogether?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

Oh, yes. Another factor, besides the increased consumption both on the United States and Canadian markets, is that Norway and Newfoundland, both of which were competitors of the Canadian fisherman, have been eliminated as such, Norway wholly

and Newfoundland in part. Therefore the Canadian industry has less competition and a chance to dispose of larger quantities of fish, and naturally it gets better returns.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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NAT

Grote Stirling

National Government

Mr. STIRLING:

Has the export to the United States of fish taken in internal waters

increased ?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

White fish from the

interior of Canada?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Winnipeg gold-eye, lake trout and so forth. .

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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

We are maintaining our average, and the large increase is on the Pacific coast in frozen halibut, fresh halibut, frozen and fresh salmon, and on the Atlantic coast, cod products, haddock and lobsters.

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NAT
LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

No; it is maintaining a stable market, which is fairly good in the middle states. There is not much interference on the part of other sections of the country with those markets in the middle states which are exclusive to inland water fish.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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LIB
LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

That is a matter of provincial concern. The provinces have control of their fisheries, which they regulate pretty well.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

What is the plight of the codfish industry, which was once the back-bone of the whole industry?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

We have had competition from Norway and the other Scandinavian countries which we had not before the first war, and there is competition from Newfoundland.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Which we have always had.

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LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

Yes, in a lesser degree, because they were not subsidized. When the British government began to subsidize the fisheries of Newfoundland they could compete with our fishermen, with the result that they invaded our best markets. Our industry was not subsidized. The same applies to competition with Norway, which was highly subsidized. After the last war they used their fishing vessels to full capacity and came into close competition with our fishermen, and they also invaded our markets. This competition from Norway and Newfoundland was the main reason for the falling down of our salt-fish industry. Conditions are, however, getting better. The monthly reports from our trade agents everywhere are optimistic. Orders for

Supply-Fisheries

dried fish exceed the available supply and a good season is anticipated. The fresh fish markets are brisk, and the increased domestic sale of canned and live lobsters to the United States during the past season has offset the loss of the British market. From month to month these business reports are practically along the same line.

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May 26, 1941