March 21, 1941

THE LATE F. C. CASSELMAN

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members will have learned with profound regret and also, I am sure, with a sense of shock, of the very sudden passing last night of one of our number, Mr. Frederick C. Casselman, the member for Edmonton East.

WThen the house assembled yesterday the hon. member was in his accustomed place in this chamber, and when the house reassembled

The Late F. F. Casselman

in the evening he was again here and, I believe, remained until after the resolution respecting the war appropriation bill had been passed and the bill itself had been introduced and received its first reading. He then left the Commons to go to his place of residence in Ottawa. As he was about to enter the door of the house he was overcome by a heart seizure and passed away immediately.

The very sudden passing of one who was only in his fifty-sixth year, one who in so many ways appeared strong and well, is evidence to us all of the great strain under which men who hold positions of responsibility labour in the discharge of their duties to-day. I doubt if any of us begin to realize how great is the burden upon the heart, as well as the mental and nervous strain borne by members of parliament who seek to discharge their duties as representatives of the people in these terrible times. So momentous have been the events of the past year that it is difficult to realize that it is less than a year since hon. members in this chamber were returned to the House of Commons by the people of Canada. Mr. Casselman, a supporter of the present administration, was one of the number who were elected to parliament for the first time in the general elections of March 26 of last year. He had therefore been a member of parliament for less than a year. He was of Canadian parentage, though born in the state of Montana. Only the first five years of his life were spent in the United States. He was educated in the province of Ontario, at Queen's University, at the university of Toronto, and later supplemented his education at the university of Alberta. He held degrees in both arts and law, and in the course of service overseas was awarded the Military Cross. He had been wounded in action.

In his chosen profession of law in the city of Edmonton Mr. Casselman gained a position of real prominence in the city. He was not content to devote his time merely to his profession. He gave evidence at an early age of his desire also to serve the public in disinterested ways. He began, as many men in public life have begun, by serving on the school board, a position he held for many years. Later, in 1937, he was elected as an alderman in the city council of Edmonton This position he continued to hold up to the time of his death. The place Mr. Casselman had won for himself in the community, his character, his abilities, his attainments, all helped to gain for him the confidence of the citizens of Edmonton, who honoured him with the representation of one of the city's constituencies in this House of Commons.

As I have already indicated, Mr. Cassel-man's services were genuinely patriotic as well as public-spirited. When he went overseas in the last war as a member of the Canadian expeditionary force, he had enlisted as a private and served for two years with Canada's forces. Later he joined a regiment of one of the imperial forces and received a commission as a lieutenant.

Reviewing the career of one who was but fifty-six years of age, a career embracing public service to his municipality, to his province and to his country, both in its parliament and on its fields of battle, one feels that the nation is indeed poorer to-day through the loss of so public-spirited and patriotic a citizen. Had Mr. Casselman been spared, there is no doubt he would have played an increasingly prominent part in the public life of Canada. As it is, he has left a record of honourable services to his city, his province and his country with which his name will be long and gratefully associated.

The hon. member has left to mourn his loss, a widow and a daughter. It will be the desire of all members of this house that you, Mr. Speaker, should convey to Mrs. Casselman and her daughter an expression of the very deep sympathy which we have for them in their great bereavement.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

May I be permitted, on behalf of myself and my colleagues, to join in the sentiments of respect and sympathy which the Prime Minister has just so eloquently expressed. I had not the honour of Mr. Casselman's acquaintance but I had observed his work in the house. I understand he was a man who did his own thinking and who was capable of expressing his own view. He came, if I gather aright, from a stock that has been the very foundation stock of this country, the United Empire Loyalists. He served his country as a schoolmaster, as a professional man, as a gallant soldier and as a legislator. He must have had a full life. He himself probably would have said that he had no regrets so far as his public activities were concerned. It will be said of him that he was a scholar and a gentleman. I am sure that on this occasion the sympathy of all of us goes out to his loved ones.

I appreciate what the Prime Minister has said with respect to the strain to which public men and those in positions of great responsibility are exposed in these terrible times. I am going through that experience myself. Therefore I think we should1 all have a measure of charity in respect of each other's failings, remembering the strain and pressure that is upon every one of us.

St. Lawrence Waterway

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LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. MacKINNON (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I wish in a few words to add my tribute to what has already been said by the Prime Minister and the leader of the opposition regarding my late colleague from the city of Edmonton.

I knew Mr. Casselman for many years in Edmonton and had been intimately associated with him. I know of the high esteem in which he was held. To a very great degree he has enjoyed the trust and confidence of the people of Edmonton, and lately in particular of the constituency of Edmonton East.

Mr. Casselman took a self-effacing but very prominent part in the public life of the city, serving with great distinction for many years as a member of the Edmonton school board, and latterly as a member of the city council. He did good by stealth, and his untimely passing is a very great loss to Edmonton, to Alberta and this parliament.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

On behalf of my colleagues and myself I would join with the Prime Minister, the leader of the opposition and the Minister of Trade and Commerce in expressing regret and sorrow at the passing of another member of this house. I have often thought in the last six years, since I have been here, that the strain of public life has told in this chamber probably more than almost anywhere else. These sad occasions have brought home to me the truth of the words of the prayer book of the church in which I was brought up, the Church of England, "In the midst of life we are in death."

I would therefore on behalf of my colleagues and myself join in the expressions of sympathy and regret that have already been voiced. I little thought yesterday as I walked into this chamber with Mr. Casselman that we would be speaking of him to-day as a departed colleague.

We extend to the widow and the bereaved daughter our very sincere sympathy in the loss which they have sustained.

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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

On behalf of the members of my group I wish to associate myself with the kind words, so thoroughly deserved, which have already been spoken regarding Mr. Casselman. The member for Edmonton East was one whom this house at this time could ill afford to lose. He was a man of understanding, vision and courage. Our sympathies go out earnestly to his bereaved family. In their sorrow they can take some comfort from the fact that he died in harness, doing, and ready and eager to do, his part.

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LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. DANIEL McIVOR (Fort William):

As a humble private member may I be allowed to pay my tribute to one whom I came to know intimately. As I saw the flowers here yesterday to cheer the living, and as I see now the flowers on the departed member's desk to commemorate one living on the other side, I am reminded of the last conversation I had with him, when I said: "What difference does it make what may be our creed or our party?" And he interrupted and said, "If you shoot straight and follow the Master Workman, that is what matters."

Our colleague has gone to God's other world and now he may see better than ever what is going on in this house.

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ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY AGREEMENT RESPECTING DEVELOPMENT OF POWER AND PROVISION OF DEEP WATERWAY FROM HEAD OF THE LAKES TO MONTREAL DOCUMENTS TABLED

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I rise to table the correspondence and documents relating to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin development, 193841, which I promised the house on Wednesday last would be tabled to-day.

I am tabling the documents in the form of a white paper which comprises the following:

Part I. Agreements with the United States and with Ontario concerning the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin development;

Part II. Correspondence between the governments of Canada and the United States, concerning the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin development;

Part III. Correspondence between the government of Canada and the government of Ontario concerning the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin development;

Part IV. Correspondence between the government of Canada and the government of Quebec concerning the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin development, and

Part V. General plan.

A publication regarding correspondence and documents relating to the St. Lawrence Deep Waterway treaty, 1932, and Ogoki river and Kenogami (Long Lake) projects, and export of electrical power, was tabled in the House of Commons on February 28, 1938. A supplementary publication was tabled on March 21, 1938. The white paper now tabled includes the [DOT] correspondence and documents relating to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin development subsequent to those publications and up to the date of the Canada-United States agreement of March 19, 1941. With what is contained in this white paper and the two previous similar papers that have been tabled

St. Lawrence Waterway

the house will I believe have before it the essential documents and correspondence relating to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence waterway agreement.

I have in my hand a summary of the outstanding features of the agreement, something in the nature of a historical sketch of the events leading up to the agreement, essential features of the agreement and the like. This has been prepared by officials of the Department of External Affairs and was given out to-day as a release to the press. It might be of some service to hon. members in subsequent discussions in the house if, for purposes of reference, this statement were printed in the Votes and Proceedings of to-day. I shall table it for that purpose.

My hon. friend the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) asked me to place on the table the legal opinion of the law officers of the crown with respect to the position of the agreement as an agreement in contrast with its presentation in the form of a treaty, more particularly with relation to the binding nature of the agreement upon both countries. I now table the correspondence setting forth an opinion from the legal adviser of the Department of External Affairs and from the Deputy Minister of Justice, also an opinion of the legal adviser of the state department, and of the Attorney General of the United States. They relate respectively to the validity of an agreement passed upon the legislative authority of parliament and of congress.

I propose that this correspondence be also printed in Votes and Proceedings so that it may be available to hon. members for future reference.

Topic:   ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY AGREEMENT RESPECTING DEVELOPMENT OF POWER AND PROVISION OF DEEP WATERWAY FROM HEAD OF THE LAKES TO MONTREAL DOCUMENTS TABLED
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

Before we leave this item of business I wish to thank the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) for having sent me, just after noon, copies of these documents, except the legal opinions which he has now tabled. In the cursory glance that I was able to give them I did not see any figures showing the ultimate cost to Canada of this project. Have any such estimates been made, and if so where can they be found?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The engineering report which I tabled the other day has some data; other data will be found in the white paper tabled to-day, and in part V of the summary.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

There are data, but there is no indication what Canada's share is.

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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

EASTER ADJOURNMENT


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

I should like to ask the Prime Minister whether the government have given consideration to the question of the Easter adjournment. Easter Sunday is April 13, and Good Friday is the 11th. Hon. members of this house who live at a distance are particularly interested in any announcement the government may make. Personally it does not matter very much to me whether we have a long adjournment or a short one, but certainly it would be a great convenience if we could have a few days at Easter to look after pressing personal affairs. Therefore if the Prime Minister is in a position to make any announcement I should be grateful if he would do so.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

My colleagues and I have carefully considered what would be most advisable in the way of an adjournment at the Easter season. The choice seems to lie, as my hon. friend has just said, between a very brief adjournment possibly from the Thursday until the following Tuesday, or an adjournment sufficiently long to enable hon. members in all parts of the house to return to their constituencies if they desire to do so; and particularly, I may add, sufficiently long to enable members of the government, who have been pretty constantly in attendance in the house during the discussion of the war appropriation measure, to give much needed attention to many important matters in their respective departments, and to give us all an opportunity to catch up on arrears. In addition, I hope to secure opportunity for something in the way of much needed rest and recreation in that period of time.

In these circumstances, I have thought that if it were acceptable to the house I would suggest an adjournment from April 9, that being a half day, until Monday, April 28. As hon. members will see, that period includes three Saturdays and Sundays. Actually the adjournment will be for little more than a fortnight. Having regard to many matters to which the government must give attention I think it is important that the adjournment should be for that length of time.

War Appropriation-Mr. Hanson (York-Sunbury)

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Subtopic:   EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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WAR APPROPRIATION BILL

PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY


Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance) moved the second reading of Bill No. 19, for granting to his majesty aid for national defence and security.


March 21, 1941