March 10, 1941

THE LATE JOHN HALL KELLY TRIBUTE TO MEMORY OF CANADA'S FIRST HIGH COMMISSIONER TO EIRE

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I have to-day received the following cable from Premier de Valera of

Eire:

I wish to express my sincere sympathy with you and the Canadian government on the death of Mr. Hall Kelly, your distinguished representative in Dublin. He has endeared himself to all who knew him, by his personal qualities, and by his zeal and devotion in fostering close and cordial relations between Canada and Ireland.

I am sure that hon. members of this house will have learned with deep regret of the passing of Canada's first high commissioner to Eire. The career of Mr. John Hall Kelly is a record of industry, charity and devotion to the public interest. With few early advantages, Mr. Kelly gained for himself a high place in his chosen profession of law and success in the businesses in which he was engaged. As a member of the legislature of the province of Quebec, as an appointed member of the legislative council, and as minister without portfolio in the government of Quebec, he gave to his native province long and unselfish service. In him were joined the traditional eloquence of the Irish race and an ever present and kindly interest in the welfare of his fellow men.

Since his arrival in Dublin Mr. Kelly quietly and effectively worked for Canadian-Irish good will. His reports to the government have been of much value and it has been a great satisfaction to myself and my colleagues to note how warmly he has been welcomed by the people of Eire. The tribute which has been paid by Premier de Valera to his personal qualities, his zeal and his devotion is, itself, an indication of the loss which both countries have suffered by Mr. Kelly's passing.

Topic:   THE LATE JOHN HALL KELLY TRIBUTE TO MEMORY OF CANADA'S FIRST HIGH COMMISSIONER TO EIRE
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

I desire to associate myself with

Questions

the words of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) with respect to the sudden, I might say the shockingly sudden death of Mr. John Hall Kelly. I knew Mr. John Hall Kelly for more than thirty years and had somewhat intimate relations with him extending over that period. I learned to value highly the many good qualities which he possessed, not the least of them being his fine Irish sense of humour.

Topic:   THE LATE JOHN HALL KELLY TRIBUTE TO MEMORY OF CANADA'S FIRST HIGH COMMISSIONER TO EIRE
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


CANADIAN ARMY (RESERVE)

NAT

Mr. ROSS (Souris):

National Government

1. How many regiments are now included in the reserve army of Canada?

2. What is the annual cost to Canada of pay and allowances of reserve army who are on full time pay?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMY (RESERVE)
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

If the hon. member will permit me, I should like to make a verbal answer to this question, because I conferred with him and I want to give him the information I have at the earliest possible moment. I have not all the information which he asks for.

To the first question, the answer is as follows:

493, composed of regiments of cavalry, batteries of artillery, engineer and signal formations, battalions of infantry, army service corps, medical corps, dental corps, ordnance corps and postal corps units, and Canadian officers training corps contingents.

The answer to the second question is that there are personnel of the reserve army who are employed outside the unit, for instance, on full time duty on staffs of training centres and on district staffs. It is assumed that the inquiry relates to personnel who are performing duties in reserve army units. I have consulted with my hon. friend, and I understand that that is what is desired. There is no fixed annual cost, because the number employed is constantly fluctuating. Information is not available at national defence headquarters without reference to each military district where the pay of officers and other ranks employed full time in reserve units can be segregated from pay and allowances of those otherwise employed and those of the active army. In order to afford some idea of present payments, the military districts were asked to compile the amount of pay and allowances paid to such personnel in the month of January, 1941. This aggregated 8242,400. It would require monthly compilations by each district to make up the aggregate amount

14873-86*

paid for the calendar year 1940. If this is required, telegrams will be sent to the various military districts asking that these compilations be made, and the results will be tabled as soon as received.

I should like my hon. friend to take into consideration the answer to the question, and if he will let me know, I shall be very glad to comply with his wishes, whatever they may be, with regard to additional compilations.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMY (RESERVE)
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MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS

?

Mr. HO WE@

There are two main industries in Sorel, Quebec, engaged in contracts for the Department of Munitions and Supply and for the British government. The Marine Industries Limited are building corvettes, and the Sorel Industries Limited are engaged in work jointly required by the Canadian and British governments. We presume the questioner refers to the latter.

1. The Sorel Industries Limited is a privately owned company operating under a control committee, of which two members represent the Canadian government and two represent the original private company

2. No.

3. The original contract was entered into by the Sorel Industries Limited with the British government before the Department of Munitions and Supply was organized. The contract has since been revised to take care of Canadian requirements by the Department of Munitions and Supply, and further British requirements. Because of the joint nature of the contract, details as to its terms cannot be given.

4. No.

5. Answered by 4.

6. No. The original contract was a British government contract. The revised contract is a Department of Munitions and Supply Canadian government contract.

Questions

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS
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BUILDING OF CARGO SHIPS IN CANADA

NAT

Mr. BRUCE:

National Government

1. How many keels have been laid down in the various shipbuilding yards in Canada since September 3, 1939?

2. How many cargo ships have been completed since September 3, 1939?

3. How many of the said ships are in service?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS
Subtopic:   BUILDING OF CARGO SHIPS IN CANADA
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. Steel ships, 104; wooden, ships (from 16 feet to 112 feet), 380.

2. None.

3. Answered by 2.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS
Subtopic:   BUILDING OF CARGO SHIPS IN CANADA
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NEW BRUNSWICK TRAINING SCHOOLS-COST OF CONSTRUCTION

NAT

Alfred Johnson Brooks

National Government

Mr. BROOKS:

What has been the total cost of construction of, (a) training centre, Fredericton, New Brunswick; (b) training centre, Edmundston, New Brunswick?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS
Subtopic:   NEW BRUNSWICK TRAINING SCHOOLS-COST OF CONSTRUCTION
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

(a) $253,244.95, as of

January 31, 1941; (b) $191,712.59, as of January 31, 1941.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS
Subtopic:   NEW BRUNSWICK TRAINING SCHOOLS-COST OF CONSTRUCTION
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SUSSEX, N.B., MILITARY CAMP

NAT

Mr. BROOKS:

National Government

1. Is it the intention of the government to purchase more land in the vicinity of Susses military camp (a) for training purposes; (b) to provide for an airport?

2. What has been the total cost to date for the construction of the Sussex military camp since January 1, 1940?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS
Subtopic:   SUSSEX, N.B., MILITARY CAMP
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LIB

Mr. CASGRAIN: (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

1. (a) Under consideration

no decision irrived at. (b) No.

2. Amount committed to March 6, 1941: $2,074,000, of which $1,474,733.56 had actually been disbursed up to January 31, 1941.

cost OF THIRTY-DAY TRAINING

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-SOREL PLANTS
Subtopic:   SUSSEX, N.B., MILITARY CAMP
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March 10, 1941