December 6, 1940


Hon. IAN A. MACKENZIE (Minister of Pensions and National Health): Mr. Speaker, I had a statement prepared dealing with the general question of the programme of the government respecting the rehabilitation of ex-service men. I sent that statement this morning to the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) and to the leaders of the other groups. With the consent of the house I should like to have that statement, which is entirely informative and interpretative of the various orders in council and the policies already adopted by the government, placed upon the records of this house. The house has been informed by several of my colleagues of the tremendous scope and scale of Canada's war activities from military, industrial and financial standpoints, but we are all acutely conscious that, following the tremendous upheaval of war, there will come the even more difficult problems of post-war reconstruction, with which my own department, that of Pensions and National Health, is inevitably associated in the public mind. There is not only the problem of rehabilitating the ex-service men-that task is already with us, and in a measure has been grappled with-but that is only one aspect of the vastly greater and more complex task of reorganization and readjustment of our whole national life from a war-time to a peace-time basis. The government has established an organization for the purpose of planning and directing the country's activities during this critical transitional period. Necessarily the existing organization of the Department of Pensions and National Health has been called upon to take an important part in this programme. Now let us speak of the discharged soldiers and of the after-war problems, dealing first with those concrete and specific measures which have been already taken to provide for the welfare of the men whose services with the forces have already been terminated and with the measures taken looking towards the problem of demobilization and rehabilitation in its broader aspects after the war. On September 2, 1939, by P.C. 2491, the benefits of our Pension Act and the whole machinery of the Canadian pension commission were placed at the disposal of the members of the naval, military and air forces of Canada who, while serving on active service, suffer disabilities. In the same way, the dependents of such members of the services who met death in the performance of their duties on active service were brought under the benefits of the existing pension legislation. Later, in the light of administrative experience, P.C. 1971 was passed on May 21, 1940, providing certain regulations for the guidance of the Canadian pension commission in administering the act in its relation to men on active service in the present war. The chief principle involved in the order in council of May, 1940, was a clearer definition of the responsibility of the state, in relation to those whose service occurred in Canada. It was provided that, where the man served in Canada only, the liability for war pension should exist only when disability or death arose as a direct result of the performance of military duties. It will be realized that thousands of the men on active service in Canada are engaged in their military duties for only a limited number of hours per day and that, in the evenings and on week-ends, they are at liberty in very much the same way as the ordinary civil employees of the government. In fact, thousands of men are being enrolled in this war with the avowed intention that their service shall take place entirely in Canada. I need only mention the ground crews employed in the air training plan. These men are in uniform and. are subject to military discipline because that is the form of organization in which they are employed. Actually, many of them are living normal civilian lives except for the hours during which they are on duty. Full protection is given where death or disability arise as the



Post-War Reconstruction-Soldiers result of the performance of duty. But a number of cases arose in which men were the victims of accident while away from their military duties and under circumstances in no way associated with their service. It was not considered that any claim for war pension should arise from the consequences of accidents and incidents which come to all of us in the course of our ordinary lives. A special regulation was necessary to meet this set of conditions because the original pension act was based on the conditions of the last war, when the assumption was that every man enlisted would proceed as rapidly as possible to a theatre of war. A further amendment to the pension legislation was adopted on September 25, 1940, by P.C. 63/5079. This order in council provides that Canadians who have joined the imperial forces since the outbreak of war shall receive pension at the Canadian rates. Specifically the order in council provides that the Canadian Pension Act shall apply to persons who were resident and domiciled in Canada at the outbreak of the war and who, subsequent to September 1, 1939, have become members of the naval, military or air forces of the United Kingdom. The benefits of the Canadian Pension Act shall apply to such persons if they suffer disability or death in respect of which a gratuity or pension is awarded under the laws or regulations of the United Kingdom, provided that the benefits shall be paid to persons who are residents of Canada, and only during the continuance of their residence therein. The object of this was to provide for pension at the Canadian scale to bona fide Canadians who since the outbreak of war, have joined the imperial forces or been transferred thereto, and who return to live in Canada, or whose dependents, in the case of death, reside in Canada. The large number of Canadians who have entered the service of the Royal Air Force and of the Royal Navy are, of course, the chief persons affected. These men have offered their services in the manner in which they can best be applied to the common cause of the empire. I am sure it is the desire of all Canadians that, because circumstances have caused their services to be rendered in the forces of the United Kingdom, they shall not be deprived of the benefits of our legislation in any particular where the Canadian law provides greater or better assistance than would be received under the laws of another part of the empire. During the present month, a further order in council (P.C. 204-6613, dated November 18, [Mr. I. A. Mackenzie.J 1940) has been adopted, to meet a problem which many members have had drawn to their attention. It is necessarily and rightly the function of the armed- forces to have on their strength only men who are fit for service, or who are expected to recover from any accident or illness which they experience, and return to service. As soon as it is determined that a man is no longer fit for service, he has no place in the armed forces, and he is very properly discharged. It was found, however, that the Department of Pensions and National Health had no authority to admit men to hospital after their discharge, unless and until it was ascertained that the disability was pensionable. The new order in council overcomes a very serious difficulty. It is now provided that, if a man is in hospital under the department at the time of his discharge, treatment Shall be continued, and a special allowance equal to assigned pay and dependents' allowance .to the man's dependents shall be continued until treatment is concluded, or it has been determined whether the man is eligible for pension. If a ruling is given that the man is not eligible for pension, the allowance shall continue for a period of seven days thereafter. Treatment, however, may be continued by the Department of Pensions and National Health until completed. This order in council will, it is felt, avoid much hardship which would otherwise accrue to the families of men who are found unfit for further military service during the time required to adjudicate on the question of pension entitlement. There have been approximately 20,000 discharges from the armed services, but many of these represent persons who did some temporary guard duty in their own localities. Some served for a few days or few weeks and the majority were never far away from their own provinces. It cannot be said that their contact with civilian life was completely disrupted for a long period, and in fact the majority have been reemployed. About 1,000 men have returned from service overseas, about two-thirds of whom have been discharged to civil life. Although the tremendous amount of war industry and general commercial prosperity resulting from the large war expenditures have created a most favourable employment market in Canada, special problems have already developed in connection with the placement and welfare of these discharged men. At my personal request, one of my principal advisory officers made a tour of the chief Canadian cities investigating present condi- Post-War Reconstruction-Soldiers tions, and his observations were placed before a general advisory committee, whose functions I intend later to describe in detail. Following a most careful study of the problem, in the course of which the views and experience of many private organizations and agencies interested in the welfare of the soldier were obtained, the government has decided to create, in the Department of Pensions and National Health, a new division, to be known as the veterans' welfare division. There will be representatives of the division in all principal centres where such representation is needed and there will be a chief administrative officer at Ottawa. The duties of this division and its representatives will be as follows: (a) To interview, advise and assist former members of the forces. (b) To become conversant with all regulations relating to pensions, allowances, medical treatment, employment, training, social welfare and other policies that may be of assistance to the ex-service men. (c) To make a study of all occupational opportunities in the areas at which sub-divisions are established. (d) To encourage employers to reemploy discharged men who were formerly in their service. (e) To endeavour to secure preference for ex-service men in employment by industry generally. (f) To keep in constant touch with the employment service of Canada, with regard to available employment. (g) To obtain information from the Department of National Defence with respect to members of the forces arriving in the several areas for discharge, to arrange for notification to be sent to their families and to encourage volunteer local committees to welcome them. (h) To maintain contact with veterans' organizations, with a view to fostering interest in the rehabilitation of former members of the forces, and to keep in touch with all other agencies likely to be of assistance. (i) To develop favourable public opinion regarding the reestablishment of former members of the forces. (j) To report to Ottawa on the activities and requirements in each district, and upon the results of the various types of reestablishment activity. At the same time, I am able to inform the house that the auxiliary services of the Department of National Defence have instructed their local representatives to establish contact with all men at the time of discharge, and refer them to facilities that have been organized to assist in their reestablishment. With the creation of the veterans' welfare division to coordinate civilian activities, a complete liaison will now be established, so that the man will be informed of all measures available to assist him in his return to normal civil life. Prior to the establishment of the veterans' welfare division, measures had been taken in all chief centres to bring together the voluntary agencies desirous of assisting the ex-service men. The representative of the department, whose tour of Canada I have just described, held meetings in the following centres: Montreal, Quebec, Saint John, Halifax, Kingston, Toronto, London, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon. Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. In many of these centres he found citizens' committees already in existence, awaiting only some guidance and official machinery which would bring them into direct contact with the problem. In other centres representative groups were called together and arranged to create such committees. The form which the committees take will vary, according to the desires of the community itself. Thus, in New Brunswick it was decided to ask the Red Cross society, which has branches in every community, to undertake the formation of committees throughout the province to interest themselves in the placement of men returned from overseas. In several cities, particularly in the west, it was felt that the already established machinery of the veterans' assistance committees should be utilized and it was decided to add to the personnel of the voluntary committees to make them more broadly representative of the community at large and of those in a position to assist. In Toronto, a citizens' committee, consisting very largely of outstanding industrial leaders, was in existence and had already placed some 250 men. Other organizations, such as the greater Toronto war services advisory council, agreed to cooperate. One large industrial company has agreed to offer the facilities of its personnel division as a centre in which any official selected by the government might be trained in vocational guidance and placement work in the Toronto area, without cost to the public. I wish to express my personal appreciation of this splendid offer, because it is very evident that trained placement and vocational guidance personnel will be required by the department in increasing numbers as the problem develops. As an illustration of the type of voluntary committees now being formed, it is interesting to note that in Saskatoon there were



Post-War Reconstruction-Soldiers representatives on the committee of the Canadian Legion, of organized labour, of the government employment service, of the youth training programme, and of the board of trade. It is the desire of the government that organizations such as these shall be represented in the local committees on as wide a basis as possible and I wish to express my personal appreciation of the extreme willingness to cooperate which was found in all parts of Canada. Generally speaking, the problem of employment is not acute at the present time, although, admittedly, there are individual problem cases which can best be handled by these local committees familiar with the personal and family history of the men themselves and with the local conditions to which thev must be adjusted. At this stage, I should like to inform the house that amendments to our pension legislation have so far been enacted by order in council under the authority of the War Measures Act. This was considered essential in order that problems arising out of administrative experience might be dealt with promptly. It is intended, however, at the present session of parliament to introduce a bill incorporating into the act the amendments already adopted by order in council, in order that they may have the consideration and sanction of parliament. I am particularly anxious to bring these matters before the house in order that the whole question may be considered by a committee of the house in consultation with the government's principal advisers such as the chairman of the Canadian pension commission and the officers of the Department of Pensions and National Health. The several amendments adopted to date were the result of very careful study and deliberation by staff committees and the government as a whole. Nevertheless, there is no desire on the part of the government or the department to assume the role of omniscience in connection with this very human and complex problem, The government is most anxious to receive the cooperation and advice of this house in connection with its pension legislation, and 1 look forward with keen anticipation to the work of the committee to whom the house will be asked to refer the bill, which it will be my duty to present at an early stage of the present session. The foregoing measures just described are applicable especially to the men now being discharged, and constitute the nucleus of legislation and administrative measures out of which will be developed the nation's programme for the demobilization period, when several hundred thousands of men will suddenly be transferred from war-time to peacetime activities. It was recognized from the outset that the demobilization period calls for long range planning, and that no single government department could begin to cope with a problem of such magnitude-affecting as it must every phase of the national life. On December 8, 1939, by P.C. 406S-j, the government created a special cabinet subcommittee on demobilization and rehabilitation to study and advise upon measures which will be required to meet the problems arising from demobilization and the discharge from time to time of members of the forces during and after the war. The Minister of Pensions and National Health was designated as convener of the committee and the other members are the ministers of Public Works, National Defence, Agriculture, Labour, and the Hon. J. A. MacKinnon, who is now the Minister of Trade and Commerce. The cabinet committee was authorized to appoint advisory committees selected from the personnel of government departments and to consult provincial and municipal authorities and public service organizations generally. A general advisory committee, under the chairmanship of the Canadian pension commission, was organized and a series of subcommittees dealing with specialized phases of the problem was formed. These committees have been functioning for some months and exceedingly valuable preliminary reports have been received. However, this fall, it was found necessary to give legal status to the advisoiy committee and this was done by P.C. 5421, dated October 8. It is provided that the advisory committee shall consist of: The chairman of the Canadian pension commission, who shall be chairman; The chairman of the war veterans' allowance board, who shall be vice-chairman; And of the following members:- The chairman of the civil service commission. The deputy minister of labour and two other members nominated by the Minister of Labour. The deputy minister of public works and two other members nominated by the Minister of Public Works. The director of auxiliary services, Department of National Defence, and two other members nominated by the Minister of National Defence. Post-War Reconstruction-Soldiers Two members nominated by the Minister of Agriculture. The deputy minister of pensions and national health, and two other members nominated by the Minister of that Department. Two members nominated by the Minister of Finance. One member nominated by the Minister of Trade and Commerce. Broadly speaking, the chief governing principles which are guiding the committee in its work may be stated as follows:- 1. To avoid duplication of machinery and clashes of jurisdiction on the one hand, and to avoid gaps in administration on the other. 2. The Employment Service of Canada established under the Unemployment Insurance Act will give specialized attention to the placement of ex-service men. 3. Information, guidance and directional services to be furnished by the Department of Pensions and National Health. 4. Pension and other legislation to be extended and modified from time to time, to meet the new conditions of the present war, as may be found advisable. 5. The work of the general advisory committee to be kept strictly advisory in character -administrative responsibility being assumed by appropriate departments and branches of the executive government. Prior to the passing of this order in council, the work was being done almost entirely by government officials. But authority has now been granted to name recognized experts from outside the service to assist on the subcommittee. The general advisory committee is also authorized to bring before it persons specially qualified to advise on any matters coming within its terms of reference. A small secretariat has been established for the purpose of compiling the results of the efforts of the committee and its several subcommittees. I have already indicated very largely the extent to which action has been taken as a result of the deliberations of the cabinet committee and the several staff committees. But it will be of interest to the house to know in a general way the subjects under reveiw by the various subcommittees. Subcommittee on post discharge pay and service gratuity: This committee is by no means satisfied that the gratuity paid to every discharged man at the end of the last war constituted the most scientific and effective use of the very large sum of money involved in the interests of the ex-service men themselves, and is making a comprehensive study of possible alternative measures-taking into account the deferred pay situation, the rates payable by the unemployment insurance commission, training allowances, and similar factors. Subcommittee on vocational and technical training and retraining. There is a strong sentiment in this committee in favour of occupational training- For those who are disabled in such a way as to prevent them from returning to their former occupations; For those who have served for twelve months and whose technical, academic, or industrial training or education has been interrupted; For others, honourably discharged after twelve months' service, who are considered by competent vocational guidance officers by reason of their age, aptitudes and inclinations to be benefited from such training. In this connection, the work of the Canadian Legion war services, in affording secondary education facilities to the men while serving, has been noted with great satisfaction. The work of the committee has been divided into specialized groups dealing with allowances, a survey of technical courses, a survey of agricultural courses, training for public sur-vice opportunities, documentation on vocations and employment opportunities. In the study which this committee has already made, there has developed a feeling that the maximum use should be made of the youth training plan already established under the Department of Labour, in cooperation with the several provinces. It is also felt that provincial and local facilities should be utilized in any programme developed under this heading. Subcommittee on retraining of special casualties. This committee has been especially concerned with the Mind, the deaf, the maimed, etcetera. In this connection, definite decisions have been made affecting those who may lose their sight. An agreement has been entered into with St. Dunstan's hospital for the treatment and training of overseas casualties of this nature up to a certain point in England at the expense of the government of Canada. In connection with those suffering from tuberculosis, it has also been decided that the existing provincial sanatoria shall be utilized, and that ex-soldiers shall be provided with their treatment there on a civilian basis. There is a pronounced sentiment, among those who have given special study to the problem of amputation cases, that every effort should be made to return this type of casualty to Canada at the earliest possible moment, rather than to prolong their treatment and convalescence in the United Kingdom.



Post-War Reconstruction-Soldiers The Canadian National Institute for the Blind and the Amputations Association have rendered very valuable advice and assistance to this committee, and I wish to express my cordial appreciation of the voluntary cooperation received from these quarters. Subcommittee on home settlement. This committee has made an intensive study of the soldiers' settlement schemes of the last war and is disposed to recommend a more limited measure of assistance which will avoid the setting up of burdensome debt contracts. It will also bear in mind that the permanent settlement of the ex-service man and his family in a home whether in the town or in the country is the ultimate aim. Subcommittee on administration of special funds. Following the last war, it will be remembered that there were surpluses from the patriotic fund, canteen funds and various other sources which were devoted to the welfare of ex-service men. None of us is altogether satisfied that these funds were applied to the best advantage. It is contemplated, therefore, that a very close eye should be kept on the probable extent of any such special funds, and that the proper steps be taken to ensure that the maximum benefit shall accrue to the ex-service men in their rehabilitation. Subcommittee on preference in public employment. The chairman of the civil service commission is presiding over this committee with a view to evolving such recommendations as may be deemed to be practicable. Subcommittee on employment service. It is anticipated that the greatly strengthened Employment Service of Canada, under the Unemployment Insurance Act, will be the agency responsible for bringing together the man seeking a job and the job seeking a man. It is contemplated that there will be a special service for ex-service men in this department. This subcommittee has developed a form upon which the vocational experience and aptitudes of men in the services may be recorded, and this form has already been found to be of great value to the Department of National War Services in connection with any redistribution of labour which may be found necessary, in order that the country's man-power may be applied to the greatest advantage in our war effort. I have enumerated the subcommittees now existing, but it is recognized that these by no means exhaust the field to be covered. It is contemplated that additional committees will be formed to take up other fields of investigation, such as- Returned soldiers' insurance. Distinctive badging for ex-servicemen. Organization of voluntary effort. Cooperation of provincial governments. Urban home settlement. General family welfare. Preferences in employment and public services other than dominion and in industrial and commercial enterprise. Post-war public works. It may be found advisable to cover even wider territory as time goes on. In repaying our debt to these men we must neither patronize nor demoralize our service men. We trust we shall not make our efforts in this regard matters of political controversy. Our men of Canada will fight a great fight; our men of Canada must be given the chance to finish the course with a fair field. We at home hold all Canada in trust for their return. They must never be permitted to return to a devitalized homeland. Parochialism would be a grave disservice to men fighting and dying for this dominion and this democracy. We cherish our federal framework of government. As long as we are truly federal we can never be fascist. We are conscious that unitary government would be destructive of unity in Canada. But our men are fighting for Canada, not for any local or parochial aim, and therefore we must realize and recognize that the remaking of Canada will constitute the major post-war reconstruction into which all our rehabilitation plans must be shaped and fashioned. In all this work of planning and perfecting of rehabilitation arrangements, we must reinforce the patriotism of those whom we seek to help. Their opportunity of serving their country in war must be enlarged for service in peace, when peace comes. Consequently, home settlement, training, and employment will bulk largely in our plans and our policies. The blueprints for the main fabric are in the Rowell-Sirois report. It is fitting that at this time there should be called a dominion-provincial conference to lay the foundations of the structure in which a living democracy can grow and develop. When our young men are offering their lives as they are to-day, we who are less fortunate must not be less generous in the contribution which we should make to our nation, to the sacred cause and the unity of our nation. I have always felt that the essentials of our Canadian citizenship can be stated very simply. They involve consent-the will to live together worthily; conservation-the preservation of our liberties and institutions; cooperation-conference with one another and courtesy. Post-War Reconstruction-Soldiers But, most important of all, contribution- both individual and corporate. Our ancestors have won for us many rights -sometimes we have taken these for granted -that life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are the inalienable rights of every citizen of a true democracy. This was a banner for every man on this continent and all over the world. Now I think we must go farther. Our method has served us well but the tempo of democratic action must be speeded up, and the purpose of our whole way of life must be reaffirmed and reestablished. Let us capitalize the deficiencies of the totalitarian schemes and values. Democracy in the days to come must roll up a counterrevolution that will recall everywhere to the banner of human freedom all the resurgent elements of human progress and definite reforming purpose, all free men and free women who believe in the necessity of constant endeavour and of constant change. Harold Laski, in his latest book, has said and they are very true words: Our choice is between the dark age of privilege and the dawn of an equal fellowship among men. Progress, combined with consent, will avoid the legacy of bitterness and hatred that extremist policies would leave behind. We war to-day against a fanatical creed combined with fiendish efficiency and cosmic aims. In our life and death struggle to win, we must satisfy the craving of the ordinary man for a dynamic creed and a burning faith in a new social justice that will move the mountains of despair. Our ancestors won for us liberties which are now the great pillars of democracy- liberty of speech, thought and writing; toleration, equality before the law, and government of the people. We shall never know the meaning of these priceless liberties until they are lost to us. We must now move on to ensure that every man will have the essentials for the pursuit of happiness; facilities for training if there is aptitude and inclination, a widening range and variety of employment, with a sufficiency of food and clothing and shelter and warmth. With these rights should go minimum duties which will form a sound and solid basis of reciprocal benefit in the upbuilding of our nation. We must expect our people to serve their country to the utmost of their capacity, but with this expectation and hope there must be fashioned and formed a charter of true democracy, security without slavery, freedom without poverty, progress without violence. As I have said, we face the difficult problem of laying down equitable pension rules, of establishing ways and means of absorbing men from the armed forces back into civilian life. It is a long-term programme, as the last war has taught us, which requires our serious consideration even in the midst of this great struggle. What form of social or economic life is to be our lot following these tragic days, is, I am sure, the deep concern of every man in this assembly. It would indeed be bold to suggest now any specific system which would remedy most of the ills of the days gone by which are now so apparent. But nothing in the story of human progress is more valuable, in my opinion, than men with inquiring minds. So that perhaps it would not be amiss to put forward the view that while the "sweet red wine of youth" is being spilt to defend those constant companions along the broad highway of all human progress-yes, and all man's highest dignity, liberty and freedom- we who occupy another form of public service might spend our time at least building the fabric into which may be incorporated a sounder system which will reveal a higher conception of public service. I do not wish to condemn completely economic, monetary, social systems of the past, but surely our future society can be better built if we benefit from the mistakes of the past and preserve the fundamental principles which existed in the period that lies behind-and supplemented, strengthened and buttressed by whatever constructive thoughts we may each and every one of us contribute to the system in the future. I am not one of those who subscribes to the very much used phrases "the post-war period of economic chaos"-and-"never again in our time will we see civilization as we have known it." I believe with all my heart-as does every man in this free House of Commons-that in all adversity lies great opportunity. I believe in the capitalistic system, or rather in true and controlled capitalism. Capitalism as I understand it-and I am sure you all agree-is simply man sharing in the benefits of nature. In other words-sweat and toil applied to the natural world. Men using their hands and their muscles to create natural wealth and industry, instead of through idleness, enjoying the unearned increment of capital.



Post-War Reconstruction-Soldiers I have no prejudice against men who, through success and enterprise, have accumulated some measure of material wealth. But the principle that has been rapidly growing of living off the unearned increment of capital instead of digging and providing capital to mankind has been one of the cardinal departures from fundamental principles, which, to say the least, has caused distress, class distinction and unhappiness. May I say that, in my judgment, there is no man in this parliament who would not honestly accept his part in the honest mistakes of the past. I would consider it a great honour and privilege, in these serious days when we are bending our will to the preservation of our very lives, to work with all members regardless of political views. I assure you, Mr. Speaker, my time will be available to work in cooperation with any member of the house to explore ways of contributing to success and victory in the difficult, terrible and anxious days ahead.


NAT

Grote Stirling

National Government

Mr. STIRLING:

There are two questions I should like to ask, if I may be permitted. Is it the intention of the government to set up, when we return in February, a special committee to deal with soldiers' affairs?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

Yes.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
Permalink
NAT

Grote Stirling

National Government

Mr. STIRLING:

The second question is this. We have read on a good many occasions recently of from fifteen to twenty thousand men who have been discharged since the beginning of this war. Surely this does not represent the medically unfit.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

I shall have to get the information from the defence services with regard to the latter part of the hon. gentleman's question. I have not that information at the moment.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
Permalink
CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

I understood the minister to say, in answer to the hon. member, that a committee would be set up to deal with the affairs of returned men. Will there be a committee to deal with the general problems of reconstruction?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

No. That committee will deal only with the question of the adequacy of pensions administration and the War Veterans' Allowance Act.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
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CCF

George Hugh Castleden

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

I believe the minister assured us last July that a health committee of the house would be set up. Can he give us an assurance now that this committee will be functioning in February?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

I do not recall such an assurance, but there is an unofficial committee of the house which will act in cooperation with the Department of Pensions and National Health.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER REHABILITATION
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO PROBLEMS OP POST-WAR RECONSTRUCTION.
Permalink

SUSPENSION OF SITTING On motion of Mr. Mackenzie King the sitting was suspended until 9.30 p.m. this day. The house resumed at 9.30 p.m.


THE ROYAL ASSENT


A message was delivered by Major A. R. Thompson, Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, as follows: Mr. Speaker, His Honour, the deputy of His Excellency the Governor General, desires the immediate attendance of this honourable house in the chamber of the honourable the Senate. Accordingly, the house went up to the Senate. And having returned. Mr. Speaker informed the house that the deputy of His Excellency the Governor General had been pleased to give in His Majesty's name, the royal assent to the following bills: An act to amend the Special War Revenue Act. An act respecting the conservation of exchange. On motion of Mr. Mackenzie King the house adjourned at 9.45 p.m. until Monday, February 17, 1941, at 3 o'clock. Monday, February 17, 1941.


December 6, 1940