August 6, 1940

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes. The government has been considering the advisability of opening a legation in one or other of the South American republics. We have had communications from more than one republic expressing the desire to be represented in Canada. The matter will continue to receive consideration with a view of making at least one appointment in the not too distant future.

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NAT

Howard Charles Green

National Government

Mr. GREEN:

Does the Prime Minister feel free to say in which countries we shall most likely be represented?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My hon. friend has mentioned two of the largest. I should think that either would be appropriate, but as to which would be best and what arrangement would be best will need to be further considered. For example, at the present time we have one minister who is accredited to both Holland and Belgium. It might be advisable to adopt a similar arrangement with reference to one or two of the South American countries.

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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Would the Prime Minister be good enough to say how long Mr. Norman has been in Tokyo?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

He has been there since last December, I believe.

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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Before that there was

nobody among the Canadian foreign staff who spoke Japanese?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I could not say that there was no one. I believe that some of the staff have had a very distinct understanding of Japanese, although I cannot say they spoke the language adequately.

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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

I always like my chief

when he is definite in his answers. Mr. Chairman, on September 11, 1939, the member for Temiscouata spoke as follows, as reported at page 114 of Hansard:

Furthermore, it is with Sir Thomas Inskip, who recently entered the House of Lords, that our high commissioner in London, Mr. Massey, had to communicate to get acquainted with the details of the negotiations taking place between the British government and the other powers. Mr. Massey has no direct contact with the French and German embassies in London, and any news he receives originates either from the Foreign Office or the members of the British cabinet.

Supply-External Affairs

Turning to page 117:

Mr. Pouliot: May I ask the Prime Minister if the high commissioner in London gets in touch with the British government or with the embassies of the various countries?

Mr. Mackenzie King: The high commissioner in London is in touch with members of the British government, particularly the secretary of state for the dominions. Through the latter source he frequently obtains information of an inside nature which he communicates immediately to the government here. He does not however come into official relations with ambassadors of other countries.

If we have ministers in other countries they should be on the same rank as ministers of any other country and get in touch with other embassies without having to follow the example of the little fellow who drives the buggy by holding a hand on the reins. There is one who drives the horse, and says "Get up", and holds the reins, and the little fellow says, "Get up" and "Whoa!" and then he thinks he is driving the horse. It seems to me that the status of our ministers abroad is similar to that. I do not see why they are dressed sartorially in beautiful uniforms when they have to get their information through Sir Thomas Inskip or his successor in office. It is the old stop' of the colonial office. That office is now divided into two sections dealing with the dominions and the colonies, but there is no difference. The only difference is in the name and staff. The Prime Minister should see to it that the status of our relations abroad is raised so that our ministers will not be considered by the powers there as country cousins. It is a great humiliation to me to hear that Mr. Massey has not the right to speak officially with any ambassador or minister of any other country except through the medium of the dominions office. I am sure my chief agrees with me in -that regard and I hope the necessary changes will be brought about as soon as possible.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My hon. friend is -confusing two -positions. He speaks of legations and he speaks of the position of the high commissioner. As far as the legations are concerned, our ministers have all the privileges that any representative of a foreign country would have in another, holding a similar position. With respect to the position of high commissioner in the United Kingdom, he is not an ambassador or minister in the sense in which ministers in foreign countries are so designated and who represent the crown. He is a representative of the government of Canada and the government of Canada has more than one means of obtaining information and of communicating with different departments of the British government. It would only confuse matters to have -the High -

Commissioner for Canada in the United Kingdom play at once the role of representative of the government of Canada and the role of representative of the king. That distinction should be kept in mind.

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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

That is why it would have been appropriate last year for the government, instead of presenting their majesties with a gold flower bowl, to give a crown to the king of Canada.

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CON

Agar Rodney Adamson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ADAMSON:

There is an increase of $127,000. This is for representatives to Canberra, Wellington, Pretoria and Dublin. Are

these new this year?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes.

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CON

Agar Rodney Adamson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ADAMSON:

It is a new departure of the government to have high commissioners in other empire capitals?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes. At the special session of parliament after the beginning of the war I said I thought there would be distinct advantages in having Canadian representatives in other parts of the British empire and that we proposed to make appointments immediately to Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Ireland. We already had our high commissioner in the United Kingdom, and these appointments have been made since the outbreak of war. This past year their salaries have been paid under the War Appropriation Act but for the present fiscal year they will be paid out of the vote which parliament is now asked to make.

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CON

Agar Rodney Adamson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ADAMSON:

In view of the growing importance of India, would the Prime Minister consider sending one of the men from the occupied countries to India? I should like to have the names of the high commissioners in these empire countries. I feel strongly about the Indian situation, because India has rather looked to us. There is so much talk about dominion status and if we had a representative in India we might prove to be of great assistance to the British government in discussions of confederation, which we know so much about, and matters of that sort. We might definitely play a great part and be of great help by having a representative there.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am wholly in sympathy with my hon. friend's remarks. Everything would depend upon the person who might be selected for such a post. It is possible that the ideal man will come along, and if we get the right person first there will not be much difficulty about arranging for the creation of the position. At any rate I am obliged to my hon. friend for bringing up the matter and I promise it will be given

Supply-External Affairs

careful consideration. As to the high commissioners appointed, Mr. C. T. Burchell of Halifax has been appointed to Australia; Doctor W. A. Riddell, who was at Washington at one time and had previously been at Geneva, has been appointed to New Zealand; Mr. Henry Laureys of Montreal has been appointed to South Africa and Mr. John Hall Kelly of Quebec has been appointed high commissioner to Ireland. Mr. Massey of course is high commissioner in the United Kingdom.

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Item agreed to. 1,3. To provide for hospitality in connection with visitors from abroad, $5,000.


LIB

John Gordon Ross

Liberal

Mr. ROSS (Moose Jaw):

I understand

that some time ago arrangements were made that no alien could cross the border with dreams. For many years past many American tourists have been coming to Canada during the shooting season and have been allowed to cross the border with shotguns, and in the big game season with rifles. Have the departments made arrangements under which aliens from the United States-not enemy aliens but aliens with proper credentials-may be allowed during the shooting season to bring their firearms into Canada?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The government has been fully alive to the importance of the tourist trade in Canada and particularly to that phase of it which is represented by the type of persons just mentioned, those coming to participate in the shooting of game. An order in council was passed a short time ago giving to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police authority to grant to persons coming to Canada from the south permits for the right to bring in firearms, provided the authorities were satisfied in all particulars as to the wisdom of granting such permits.

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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

A number of big game hunters have been coming by plane in the last few years. What procedure will they follow?

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August 6, 1940