August 6, 1940

NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Would the Prime Minister make a statement respecting passport offices? Are all the offices which were opened still functioning, or have some been closed?

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I made a short statement yesterday respecting the position in regard to passport offices. I believe it is a fact that all passports for which applications had been made had been issued at the close of last week. I believe, too, that from day to day the passport offices are now keeping abreast of the applications which come in. There may be individual instances here and there in respect of which some particulars have been lacking where it has been necessary to obtain further information before a passport could be granted. I am advised, however, that matters are now being kept up to date. All offices which thus far have been opened are still open.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Our constituents send

applications to us while the house is in session. In view of our proximity to the department we are able to obtain prompt service. When we go home, however, there may be some question as to what would be the most convenient method of procedure. Undoubtedly the people in the constituencies will continue to make applications through local members. The question arises as to whether it would be better to send those applications to Ottawa or to the nearest passport office.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

There is no reason why from now on any constituent should trouble his representative with matters of the kind, because these matters will receive prompt attention if they are directed immediately to the passport office at Ottawa, or, if more convenient, to the nearest branch office.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

If my memory serves me correctly, I believe in the past we have had considerable discussion when the estimates for the Department of External Affairs have been before the committee. At times this discussion on foreign policy has lasted a day or even more. I recognize that at a time when the nations of the world are at war one must be extremely careful of what one says on these estimates. I think when these particular estimates are before us a member of parliament becomes more aware of his responsibilities. At times we are apt to think that those responsibilities end with representing our particular constituencies. Five years ago I received, perhaps through the courtesy of Doctor Beauchesne, a copy of Beauchesne's Parliamentary Rules and Forms. Naturally I read the entire book, and on page 6 I found something very interesting. Paragraph 21 gave me some perception of the responsibilities of a member, and I should like to read this to the committee. It reads:

Every member as soon as he is chosen becomes a representative of the whole body of the Commons, without any distinction of the place from whence he is sent to parliament. That every member is equally-

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

Will the hon. gentleman give me the connection or the relationship between what he is stating and the item under discussion?

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

If you will let me read it, Mr. Chairman, I think you will see the connection.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

The rules of the house

are binding on every hon. member. I must have the relationship of the point the hon. gentleman desires to make with the item before the committee. It would be a most tedious procedure to read the rules of the bouse in debate.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

I am not reading all the rules of the house.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. CHAIRMAN:

Will the hon. gentleman

please state his point?

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

My point is that a member of parliament represents the whole commonwealth of the British empire.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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?

An hon. MEMBER:

We know that.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

What is the relevancy of that to the item before the committee?

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

It is simply that on external affairs estimates it might be thought desirable to discuss matters relevant to the British empire. I was simply pointing out that to-day the British empire-

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

There are so many questions involved in the term "British empire." The discussion must be limited to the item before the committee.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

If you will allow me to proceed, Mr. Chairman, and then if you find I am going off the course-

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

To my mind the hon.

member is already out of order.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

I might say that-

Supply-External Affairs

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

I want to be fair to the hon. gentleman. In order, however, properly to discharge my duties and to save the time of all hon. members-I am quite sure the hon. member is as much concerned about expediting the business of the committee as I am-I must insist that the hon. member show the relevancy of the point he desires to make to the item now before us.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

I desire to bring to the attention of parliament what might turn out to be the reasons why the nations of the world are at war.

Topic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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August 6, 1940