July 24, 1940

NAT

Mr. HATFIELD:

National Government

1. What action, if any, has been taken by the Minister of Agriculture regarding the many requests made to him by various farm organizations and county councils in the maritimes, relative to the granting of export freight rates on grain and grain by-products, to maritime farmers, to relieve their high cost of pork and dairy products production?

2. How many tons of mill feeds (bran shorts and middlings) have been exported to the United States of America during the past nine months and what was the average selling price per ton in Canadian dollars?

3. Do such exports of mill feeds receive the benefit of Canadian export freight rates similar to those enjoyed by exporters to Atlantic ports?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-CONTRACTS
Subtopic:   QUESTION PASSED AS ORDER FOR RETURN
Sub-subtopic:   EXPORT FREIGHT RATES ON GRAIN AND GRAIN BY-PRODUCTS
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

MORNING SITTINGS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That on and after Thursday the 25th of July until the end of the session the house shall meet at 11 o'clock in the morning of each sitting day and that in addition to the usual intermission at 6 o'clock p.m. there shall also be an intermission every day from one to three o'clock.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, before the motion is adopted I should like to point out to the Prime Minister on behalf of our small group of members that we are finding it very difficult indeed even now to attend to the business that has to be dealt with. There are three committees sitting on which we are represented; the committee on the defence of Canada regulations, the banking and commerce committee, and the unemployment insurance committee. This morning I sat in one of these committees from ten to one o'clock and the committee meets to-morrow again at ten o'clock. These three committees are sitting also in the afternoon and evening. There are in the estimates a number of items in which we are interested and in connection with which we wish to bring forward certain matters, but with the house sitting at eleven o'clock in the morning it will be impossible for us to do properly the work we are supposed to do, and I think our

whip conveyed that information to the chief whip of the government before the motion was introduced. We are willing to do all we can to facilitate the business of the house, but we feel that as private members we are unable to cope with the business we are expected to do if the house is to sit at eleven o'clock in the morning.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

May I say to my hon. friend that I think all of us are beginning to feel the pressure of committees, the sittings of the house and other duties, and may I venture to say no group more than the ministry itself. My hon. friend will realize that if the house sits in the morning, afternoon and evening, the only time the cabinet has left to hold its daily meetings is between the morning and afternoon sessions, and we shall have to arrange possibly to forego luncheon altogether in order to cover the day's work. But we are prepared to do that if it is going to help members generally to complete the work of the session. I do believe that by some adjustments and mutual cooperation it should be possible for the members who are obliged to do so to attend the committees to finish what work remains to be done, and a sufficient number of other members to remain in the house to look after questions that others may wish to ask and to follow the proceedings. I would say to my hon. friend that the government will try to arrange the business of the house in a way that will inconvenience his group and others as little as possible. If some matter should come up in the house when an hon. member who may wish to speak on it is absent, and someone on his behalf asks that the matter be allowed to stand, we shall try to meet the convenience of hon. gentlemen in that way. If there is that spirit of cooperation generally, as I am sure there is, we shall gain in the end by beginning morning sittings to-morrow. I have not suggested taking this Wednesday evening and I refrained from so doing purposely, also from asking to take Saturday of this week. With morning sittings of the house on Thursday and Friday we shall have Saturday and Sunday intervening before continuing with three sittings a day next week. If we begin morning sittings tomorrow I will .put a notice on the order paper to take next Wednesday evening and also the Saturday following in case we should run on that far, but I think we might be able to get through the business of the house early next week if we start morning sittings to-morrow.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

Is it the intention to sit in the morning next Saturday?

Prairie Farm Assistance

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Not this

Saturday.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

If there is any general disagreement with the object of the resolution I should think the Prime Minister would be wise not to press it, but if there is substantial agreement I think we ought to pass it. We are all anxious to conclude the work of the session. It is true there will be inconvenience once morning sittings start, but I am in accord with the principle of the resolution, and unless there is substantial opposition I think it ought to be passed.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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Motion agreed to.


PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE

AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW


Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) moved that the house go into committee to consider the following resolution: That it is expedient to introduce a measure to amend the Prairie Farm Assistance Act, 1939, to provide for the establishment of a board of review to determine the average yield in townships and the eligibility for assistance, and to make provision for the payment of administrative expenses incurred under the act. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject matter of this resolution, recommends it to the consideration of the house.


CCF

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. DOUGLAS (Weyburn):

This is just a notice of motion, is it not? It appeared only in yesterday's votes and proceedings.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of National War Services; Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

With the consent of the bouse we should like to advance the measure one step to-day. Everything which can be discussed on the resolution can be discussed on the second reading.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

Mr. Speaker, we are not going to object to that, but we do object to the thing being done without the consent of the house having been asked; that is all. We are glad to facilitate business, but if the minister wishes to expedite something he should ask the permission of the house.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of National War Services; Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

I apologize for not

having done so before. I now ask the consent of the house.

Motion agreed to and the house went into committee, Mr. Vien in the chair.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

I think the minister ought to make some explanation before this resolution carries.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of National War Services; Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

When the Prairie Farm Assistance Act was under discussion a year

[Mr. Church.J

ago, when it was first introduced, the suggestion was made by some hon. members, I believe on both sides of the house, that it might be advisable to place in the hands of a board some of the authority which was being placed in the hands of the minister. I stated at that time that we should like to have a year's experience of the act before deciding definitely what form of board might be used for that purpose. It will be recalled by hon. members that during the year, having advanced to a certain stage under the administration of the minister only, we appointed a committee of review, to review the evidence which had been gathered with regard to yield. We are recommending that the act be amended this year to provide that a board, instead of a committee of review, be set up under the act, which will be empowered to do many things *which were done last year by the minister.

So far as the sections of the act are concerned which make provision for the entrance of different provincial areas under the terms applicable to crop failure, it was provided last year that Saskatchewan came in with 135 townships; Manitoba and Alberta or either one of them, was required to have 100 townships each under five bushels to the acre in order to qualify. This year we are changing those figures, making for Saskatchewan 171, which is an increase of 36 townships or four municipalities: we are decreasing Manitoba from 100 to 54, and we are decreasing Alberta from 100 to 90. We regard these as constituting a better distribution of the numbers of townships which would suffer crop failure before effect is given to the act in any one of the three provinces.

Another section of importance provides that along the borderline of areas which are coming in under any of the categories, municipalities will have something to say with regard to where a boundary line will run. To-day the act provides that the boundary lines run at right angles on the township boundary line. We are now making provision, in consultation with the municipal council, that the line shall run where the deviation actually takes place as between an area of crop failure and an area which is better than a crop failure, or an area in the 8-bushel to the acre category and an area in the 12-bushel to the acre category, as the case may be.

Another provision restricts the payment to persons who have not more than 3,000 bushels of wheat, provided that their yield is not over 8 bushels to the acre. In other words, the only persons having over 3,000 bushels of wheat who are entitled to payments under the act are those wTho have yields of less than 8 bushels to the acre.

Prairie Farm Assistance

These are the most important features of the amendments.

Mr. PERLEY': I believe it is commonly agreed that the administration of the act last year was most unsatisfactory, for instance as regards inspections and the delay in payments. There are many ways in which the act could be amended to make it operate better and in particular to ensure that the payments due are made in the proper time. I understand that municipalities have made suggestions, and that at the recent convention of reeves and secretaries of municipalities they offered their services to the government this year to assist in arriving at average yields and yields per acre, so to speak, within their areas.

At this stage I do not propose to detain the committee, but when the bill itself is in committee I shall have one or two suggestions by way of amendments which I believe are worth while. If the minister will agres to give them consideration at that stage I will refrain from delaying the proceedings at this time.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW
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CCF

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. DOUGLAS (Weyburn):

There are a number of matters I desire to raise when this bill comes before the house, but I am quite willing to leave them until then, so as to prevent discussion straggling over a period of time.

There is, however, one suggestion I should like to make to the minister before the bill comes down in order that it may be incorporated if it be regarded as at all feasible. Under section 3, in what is called a national emergency scheme, payment of a bonus is contingent upon the price of wheat being less than 80 cents a bushel. The minister will remember that this question was discussed last year. At the moment it is, perhaps, not a very pressing problem, but had the price of wheat stayed where it was two or three months ago-and circumstances might arise to bring it up again; for this is not a field in which a person can prophesy with any degree of certainty-or if wheat were to reach a price in excess of 80 cents, the people who would qualify under section 3 of the present act would not be able to qualify, not because they have not a small enough crop, not because they are not entitled to it, but because the price is more than 80 cents. I know that if 135 townships in Saskatchewan had crop failures they would come under the assistance scheme, but if the number were only 60 or SO or 100 the farmers in those areas would be debarred unless some change were made in this act.

I would ask the minister to give some consideration to incorporating that idea in the

bill. It might not cost the government anything, but it would be very wise to enact that the provisions under section 3 would apply to those who qualified if their crops run into the 4 or 8 or 12 bushel classification, irrespective of what the price may be basis Fort William.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF 1939 ACT TO PROVIDE FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF BOARD OF REVIEW
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July 24, 1940