July 23, 1940

NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

I desire to ask a question of the Minister of Munitions and Supply (Mr. Howe).

The press of Canada yesterday carried a report of an announcement made on Monday last by the minister of munitions of the immediate construction of twelve munitions plants at a total cost of approximately $19,000,000. I make no observation with respect to the place of announcement. I think it is the sort of thing which ought to be done in parliament. I have consistently maintained that such announcements should first be made here.

The report indicates that the largest of these plants will be located "somewhere in western Canada", where existing facilities are being extended to produce a large tonnage of ammonia and ammonium nitrate. It is further indicated that some of these expenditures are for the account of the British government. Nowhere in the statement is it indicated that any one of these plants will be located in the maritime provinces.

I hope I am not sectional in my outlook. I have tried to avoid anything of the sort, but the people of the maxitimes, and in particular the people of my own province, are beginning to think and to give expression to the view that the government in establishing new projects of the kind indicated is entirely overlooking the maritime provinces.

May I ask the minister if any of the proposed new plants are to be established in the maritimes, and if so, which and at what points? As a substantial portion of the products of these new plants must necessarily be for export to the United Kingdom, it would appear to me to be of advantage, especially with respect to transportation, if some of these plants were to be established near tidewater in these Atlantic coast provinces. If some consideration is not given to this point of view, there will be continued dissatisfaction down there when unemployment is acute, especially in the city of Saint John.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION OF TWELVE MUNITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   PLANTS-QUESTION OF REGIONAL ALLOCATION
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Mr. Speaker, I would first beg to differ from my hon. friend the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) as to the place of making announcements from the Department of Munitions and Supply. The announcement in question was made by the publicity staff of the department. I did not see it prior to its being made. It was made in the ordinary course of routine.

We have undertaken in the Department of Munitions and Supply to conduct the purchasing of war supplies free from political pressure; and that means pressure from any group or any province, just as much as it means pressure from any particular manufacturer to obtain preference. Due regard has been had to distributing the work as well as possible across Canada. Whether or not that is possible depends upon the location of raw materials involved, transportation costs to delivery points, and available supplies of labour.

The item to which the hon. member has referred mentions the location of a plant in western Canada. This plant was located where it was purely for the reason that in western Canada we have natural gas, a wasting asset, which to a great extent may be used to replace coke from the United States in the production of the particular type of product ;o be developed by this plant.

Locations of all plants have been determined only on the basis of economy. Part of the production programme-not necessarily the particular programme to which the hon. gentleman has referred-is being located in the maritime provinces. Again it is being located there for reasons which would appeal from a business rather than a sectional point of view.

I think the province of New Brunswick is working very close to capacity. We are trying to step up production of some industries in that province, and we should be very glad indeed if we could step those industries up to the amount of material we require. We are investigating the possibility of other types of production there. I would point out to the leader of the opposition that we are just as anxious as he is to use all the industrial facilities of New Brunswick, but so far we have not seen our way clear to locate a plant at any point where the cost of production would not be economically sound from the point of view of all parts of Canada.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION OF TWELVE MUNITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   PLANTS-QUESTION OF REGIONAL ALLOCATION
Permalink
?

Thomas Miller Bell

Mr. COLD WELL:

Are these plants to be operated under public ownership and control, or is the work to be let out on a cost plus basis?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION OF TWELVE MUNITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   PLANTS-QUESTION OF REGIONAL ALLOCATION
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The policy has been for the federal government to retain ownership where a new plant is required. Where the operation of a plant requires a degree of technical skill and the operation is such that it can be conducted under government auspices, it is done in that way; but on certain occasions we have entered into a management contract with a firm specializing in the particular type of production, and the plant has been so operated.

Elections-Soldier Vote

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION OF TWELVE MUNITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   PLANTS-QUESTION OF REGIONAL ALLOCATION
Permalink

FARMERS' CREDITORS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Roy Theodore Graham

Liberal

Mr. R. T. GRAHAM (Swift Current):

Mr. Speaker, would the Minister of Finance (Mr. Ilsley) state whether the government has taken any steps to appeal the decision of the court of appeal of the province of Saskatchewan in the Berg case, which dealt with the authority of the board of review under the Farmers' Creditors Arrangement Act?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   FARMERS' CREDITORS
Sub-subtopic:   APPEAL FROM DECISION OF SASKATCHEWAN COURT OF APPEAL RESPECTING AUTHORITY OF BOARD OF REVIEW
Permalink
LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

I am informed that an appeal has been taken from that decision to the Supreme Court of Canada.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   FARMERS' CREDITORS
Sub-subtopic:   APPEAL FROM DECISION OF SASKATCHEWAN COURT OF APPEAL RESPECTING AUTHORITY OF BOARD OF REVIEW
Permalink

DOMINION ELECTIONS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Associate Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. C. G. POWER (Minister of National Defence for Air):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday on the orders of the day the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) asked what provisions were being made to extend the franchise to soldiers, now under active service conditions, who are electors of the constituencies in which by-elections are about to be held.

Two questions are involved, the first being the right of a member of the Canadian active service force or the armed forces of the dominion to vote. There is no question whatsoever that he has a right to vote. This will be seen to be covered by section 16, subparagraph 4, of the Dominion Elections Act, which reads:

Any person on active service with the naval, military or air forces of Canada shall be deemed to continue to ordinarily reside in the polling division in which he was ordinarily resident at the time of enrolment for such active service, unless he has thereafter established some other ordinary residence in Canada.

In view of this provision any person now on active service, who was ordinarily resident at the time of his enrolment and is still ordinarily resident in an electoral district in which a by-election, has been ordered, is entitled to have his name entered on the list of electors and to vote at such by-election.

The real point raised by my hon. friend was whether it was possible or practicable to take any steps to provide facilities for this soldier to poll his vote if he 'has a right to vote. On consultation with the office of the chief electoral officer I found that it was impossible

in practice and utterly impracticable to endeavour to provide a soldier in Greenland, Iceland, the old country or at some point across Canada with facilities to exercise his right to the franchise. Hon. members of the house and you, Mr. Speaker, know that the regulations drawn up to provide for the taking of the vote of soldiers in Canada and overseas were somewhat complicated. The work required the services of a fairly large personnel and the attention of members of the naval, military and air forces. I suggest to my hon. friend and to hon. members that the men in our military services are occupied with other things at the present. time and it would be extremely difficult to take them away from their work in, order to set up the machinery necessary to provide for the taking of what after all would be a small number of votes when compared to the large number of men in the expeditionary forces, at home and abroad.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink
NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition):

That answer is hardly good enough.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink
LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Associate Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

Too bad.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink
NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

The minister as yet has not given a real reason why this vote should not be taken. The gist of the matter is that the government are so anxious to get on with these by-elections that they are not willing to extend the time between the issuing of the writs and the actual polling, nor are they willing to expend the money necessary to get these votes. This could be done if there was the will to do it.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink
LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Associate Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

The answer I make to my hon. friend is that if he wants to play politics, he can do it. Hon. members know that the military regulations governing the taking of the last military vote were the best ever enacted in Canada.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink
NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

I never denied that.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink
LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Associate Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

They gave the right to a free and untrammelled exercise of the franchise by every soldier. Those who prepared those regulations have come to the conclusion that it would be utterly impracticable to ask the officers of our armed forces in the West Indies, in Iceland, in the United Kingdom and throughout Canada to set up polling booths in each unit at all points where Canadian soldiers, sailors or airmen are now stationed or operating, on the chance there would be someone there entitled to vote at Saskatoon or Kingston or the two other constituencies in which by-elections are to be held.

Special War Revenue Act

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

May I just say a word to my hon. friend about the government's alleged anxiety to have these by-elections over speedily. The criticism which has been directed against the government from many sources has been that we have delayed the bringing on of the by-elections, the vacancies having occurred in most of the constituencies a couple of months ago. Further, if we had been anxious to hasten the by-elections in any way, we could have brought in a special amendment to cover the holding of a byelection in war time.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION OF TAKING SOLDIER VOTE IN FORTHCOMING BY-ELECTIONS
Permalink

DAIRYING INDUSTRY


Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) moved the third reading of Bill No. 89, to amend the Cheese and Cheese Factory Improvement Act. Motion agreed to and bill read the third time and passed.


July 23, 1940