July 16, 1940

PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 91. for the relief of Agnes Dorothy Smith Bruneau.-Mr. Hazen. Bill No. 92, for the relief of John Eric Pitt.- Mr. Factor. Bill No. 93, for the relief of Dennis Calvert Kerbv.-Mr. McIIraith. Bill No. 94, for the relief of Camille Perks.- Mr. Bercovitch. Bill No. 95. for the relief of Maria Cecilia Patricia Gatien Rowell.-Mr. Tomlinson. Bill No. 96, for the relief of Lemuel Athelton Lewis.-Mr. Homuth. Bill No. 97, for the relief of Joseph Philias Hector Sauvageau.-Mr. Hill. On division.


BRITISH CHILDREN

STATEMENT OF MR. ATTLEE IN BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS ON OVERSEAS RECEPTION SCHEME


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. T. A. CRERAR (Minister of Mines and Resources):

Mr. Speaker, a question was directed to Mr. Attlee, Lord Privy Seal, in the British House of Commons to-day touching the movement of British children overseas. I shall give the question and his answer. The question was whether he could give any further information about the progress of the children's overseas reception scheme, and he replied:

Yes, sir. The house has already been made aware of the extremely generous offers for the reception and maintenance of British children during the war that have been made from Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Union of South Africa, and also from the United States of America. These offers were already sufficient to account for a very substantial number of children, and I have no doubt that they by no means indicate the limit of the hospitality which might ultimately be made available overseas.

Illegal Organizations

As regards the response in this country, the number of children for whom applications were made exceeded the number for whom responsibility had been offered. The government ivould have no difficulty in providing shipping required as sufficient tonnage could be made available. On the other hand the government feel strongly the responsibility that rests upon them to see that any children who go overseas under the government scheme should have such naval protection as would reasonably ensure the safety of their passage during the voyage. The fate of the Arandora Star shows that even a fast passenger vessel cannot always rely for safety on her speed if she is unescorted.

Unfortunately a radical change in the situation since applications were first invited has occurred as a result of the loss of the services of a large part of the French fleet. It is, therefore, in the present circumstances essential to concentrate our whole naval forces on the task of meeting the overriding demands of national security. It is this consideration alone which has forced the government reluctantly to conclude that they must postpone the operation of the scheme for transference of the children overseas until the situation at sea enables them to provide naval escort for ships employed for this purpose.

Similarly the government feel there must be a postponement of special arrangements which they were prepared to make in eases where schools here had planned to transfer pupils to schools in Canada.

Ordinary fast passenger vessels are not escorted and if children are carried on such vessels outside any government scheme the responsibility for any risks on the voyage would not be on the government. In any case the numbers of such children must be limited, since I am bound to repeat that the imperative necessity of conserving our dollar resources to meet other essential demands makes it impossible to allow remittances of funds in any form for the purpose of their maintenance in Canada and the United States.

The government realize that postponement of their scheme, although inevitable, is bound to cause great disappointment amongst parents here and also among those who in the dominion have so whole-heartedly cooperated in making preparations for the reception of the children and their maintenance. I desire to assure them that we keenly appreciate their generosity and deeply regret the inconvenience which the postponement of our scheme is bound to cause them.

To those also in the United States of America who have spared no effort to find homes for the British children I would like to express on behalf of his majesty's government our warmest thanks. I hope that our scheme is only temporarily suspended and that we may yet be able to partake of that warm-hearted hospitality so spontaneously and readily offered.

Topic:   BRITISH CHILDREN
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF MR. ATTLEE IN BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS ON OVERSEAS RECEPTION SCHEME
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SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES


REASONS FOR DECLARING TECHNOCRACY INCORPORATED and Jehovah's witnesses ILLEGAL ORGANIZATIONS On the orders of the day:


CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. ANGUS MacINNIS (Vancouver East):

Mr. Speaker, for a number of days I have had a question that I wished to ask of the Minister

of Justice (Mr. Lapointe) but I have just learned with regret that he is not likely to be in the house for some time. Consequently I would ask my question of the government in the hope that an answer may be given, if not now, at some later time. .

My question is this: Can the government give the house precise information why the organizations known as Technocracy Incorporated and Jehovah's Witnesses have been declared illegal? Since the banning of these organizations I have received many letters and communications from people who are puzzled as to why the activities of these organizations were considered illegal.

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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LIB

Georges Parent (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. member has now asked his question and-

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

I shall finish in a very few words, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Sit down.

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

I am asking a simple question of the government, as I have a right to do without all this furore being raised on the other side of the -house. I do not use many words in asking questions, and I object to this curtailment of the liberty of members of parliament in asking questions of the government.

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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LIB

Georges Parent (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

As I understood it, the

hon. gentleman had already given the gist of his question, and I think that the minister who makes reply knows exactly what is required in the way of answer. I would again bring to the attention of the house-

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

Mr. Speaker, my question consists of six lines. Surely I should be permitted to read six lines to the house.

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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LIB

Georges Parent (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Yesterday I had to draw to the attention of the house the fact that hon. members in asking questions of the government on the orders of the day should bring in nothing extraneous, that the minister should simply know what the question was about. The hon. member has now made his statement and I think an answer could be given.

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, my hon.

friend had sent notice of his question to the Minister of Justice, and the minister had a reply which he was prepared to make had he been in the house. In his absence I will read his reply:

"It is not the policy to disclose confidential information upon which a recommendation under the defence of Canada regulations is

National Registration

made by the minister. However, the literature of Technocracy Incorporated discloses, in effect, that one of its objects is to overthrow the government and constitution of this country by the use of force. The literature of Jehovah's Witnesses discloses, in effect, that man-made authority or law should not be recognized if it conflicts with the Jehovah's Witnesses' interpretation of the Bible; that they refuse to salute the flag of any nation or to hail any man; and, that they oppose war.

"The general effect of this literature is, amongst other things, to undermine the ordinary responsibilities of citizens, particularly in time of war."

Topic:   SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
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INQUIRY AS TO REPORTED LOSS IN GOVERNMENT MARKETING OPERATIONS

July 16, 1940