July 2, 1940

QUESTION RESPECTING "CALLING CANADA" ADVERTISEMENT IN NEWSPAPERS


On the orders of the day:


CON

Agar Rodney Adamson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. A. R. ADAMSON (York West):

I should like to address a question to the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe): In view of his statement to the house on June 27 with regard to "Calling Canada," what if any action has been taken; or does he propose to take action, and if so under what act or regulation? I am sorry I had not an opportunity to give my right hon. friend notice of the question before the house met.

Topic:   BRITISH CHILDREN
Subtopic:   QUESTION RESPECTING "CALLING CANADA" ADVERTISEMENT IN NEWSPAPERS
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Right Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice):

This inquiry comes just

after my having received a telegram signed by a lady and two gentlemen, saying:

You said that you were going to investigate "Calling Canada." Here is the number of our room at the Chateau Laurier. Please investigate.

It is not my purpose to investigate those highly estimable ladies and gentlemen. But what I said was that I would submit the advertisement in question to my officers, in order to ascertain whether it comes under some of the regulations respecting the Defence of Canada; that is all.

Topic:   BRITISH CHILDREN
Subtopic:   QUESTION RESPECTING "CALLING CANADA" ADVERTISEMENT IN NEWSPAPERS
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Be careful that you do not make martyrs of them.

Topic:   BRITISH CHILDREN
Subtopic:   QUESTION RESPECTING "CALLING CANADA" ADVERTISEMENT IN NEWSPAPERS
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE (Quebec East):

I won't.

Topic:   BRITISH CHILDREN
Subtopic:   QUESTION RESPECTING "CALLING CANADA" ADVERTISEMENT IN NEWSPAPERS
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NATIONAL DEFENCE

PROPOSED USE OF GAS INSTEAD OF COAL IN BUILDINGS ERECTED IN CALGARY FOR WAR PURPOSES


On the orders of the day:


SC

Charles Edward Johnston

Social Credit

Mr. C. E. JOHNSTON (Bow River):

Mr. Speaker, I have a question which I believe might be directed to the Minister of Munitions and Supply (Mr. Howe). I received a telegram from the vice-president of district 18, United Mine Workers of America. They say government contracts have been let for war buildings in the Calgary area in which the original specifications called for mechanical firemen for coal consumption. The contract required that mechanical firemen be installed. Since then I understand specifications for the contract have been changed, and the order now is to instal machines for gas instead of coal consumption. The United Mine Workers of America are very much concerned, and properly so, because of the effect it will have in the mining areas of Alberta, particularly around Drumheller, if the new installations require gas instead of coal. Will the minister please tell the house what has been done, and whether or not the specifications in this particular have been changed?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   PROPOSED USE OF GAS INSTEAD OF COAL IN BUILDINGS ERECTED IN CALGARY FOR WAR PURPOSES
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply; Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

The work in question was ordered by the Department of Munitions and Supply on the specifications of the Department of National Defence for Air, in compliance with the usual practice. I have no knowledge as to these particular specifications. In any event it seems to me that as, by either system, local products are being used, little criticism can be made. It then becomes a matter of the judgment of the Department of National Defence for Air as to which is the more efficient installation.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   PROPOSED USE OF GAS INSTEAD OF COAL IN BUILDINGS ERECTED IN CALGARY FOR WAR PURPOSES
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RATES PAYABLE BY ENLISTED MEN AND WOMEN TRAVELLING BY TRAIN


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. C. G. POWER (Minister of National Defence for Air):

On Friday last the hon.

member for Peterborough West (Mr. Fraser) asked if anything is being done "to fix special and reasonable rates for enlisted men and women travelling by train." The reply furnished by the officer of the department is as follows:

Personnel of the Canadian Active Service Force may obtain through their commanding officers special forms which will entitle them to.

Royal Canadian Air Force

obtain round trip tickets on the railways for the price of a one-way fare. Special week-end rates, when in effect, are available to soldiers as well as civilian travellers, and may be obtained upon application.

Topic:   RATES PAYABLE BY ENLISTED MEN AND WOMEN TRAVELLING BY TRAIN
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ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE

STATEMENT AS TO PRESENT POSITION WITH RESPECT TO RECRUITING

LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. C. G. POWER (Minister of National Defence for Air):

About a week ago the hon. member for Kootenay West (Mr. Esling) asked for some information with respect to recruiting in the air force. I have here a statement explaining the procedure with respect to recruiting, and I am prepared either to read it or to ask permission that it be placed on Hansard.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRESENT POSITION WITH RESPECT TO RECRUITING
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Read it.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRESENT POSITION WITH RESPECT TO RECRUITING
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LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Air; Minister of National Defence for Air and Associate Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

Very well; I shall do so.

I should like to take this opportunity to give a brief account of the present position of recruiting for the Royal Canadian Air Force. As the house knows, the requirements of the Royal Canadian Air Force for recruits can be divided broadly into two classes. First, there are the air crews, that is, those who actually will fly either as pilots, air gunners or observers, and, second, there is the maintenance personnel, both trained and untrained, using the word "maintenance" in its broadest sense as including all those whose duties are necessary to the operation of active service squadrons or training establishments. Both of these groups require training, the extent of which depends upon the qualifications necessary to perform the task to which they will be assigned. The problem of recruiting is, therefore, in large part a training problem and the rate at which recruiting can properly proceed is conditioned by the rate at which the capacity of existing training facilities can be enlarged and extended. It is obvious that recruits ought not to be called up and withdrawn from their civil occupations until we are in a position to train them to perform their duties in accordance with the plans that have been made. It is simply not possible to call them all up at once.

Nevertheless, the house will recall that, in conformity with our determination to accelerate our training effort in every way, we determined some time ago to enlist immediately 5,000 recruits who otherwise would not have been called up until some future date. I am happy to report that these enlistments have been proceeding at the rate of about

1,000 per week-a rate which, under the circumstances, must be regarded as satisfactory. .Some idea of the amount of work involved

can be gained from the fact that since September 15 last over 115,000 men have requested and obtained information from us relative to enlistment in the Royal Canadian Air Force. This is in addition to a great many informal inquiries of which no record is kept. Of course, not all who receive papers complete them and actually offer their services, but a very large number have done so and over 26,000 have passed the medical examination and been trade tested. Of these over 13,000 officers and men have been already enlisted and, as I have said, the balance are being called up as rapidly as circumstances permit. Of the 13,000 who have not been enlisted, 1,433 have made application to be trained as crew men; 7,962 desire to be trained tradesmen, while 4,000 are unskilled. With respect to the 4,000 who are unskilled, they may at any time join any other force or unit of the expeditionary forces. However, we would like to keep on the strength those men who provide good material for air or ground crews. A reserve of 1,400 is not too large for our requirements of air crew men. As a matter of fact, it is a rather low reserve to have, considering the number of future pilots, gunners and observers who will be needed very shortly for training.

So far as the selection of individual recruits is concerned, this is determined by priority of application except to the extent that there may be a special need for those with special qualifications. In the nature of things some trades are needed in greater numbers than others and thus it often happens that of two candidates volunteering at the same time, one will be called before the other. This is sometimes rather hard for the individual to understand, but the house, I am sure, will realize why it must be so. The procedure on application for enlistment is that every applicant is interviewed personally with a view to ascertaining in a general way whether he posseses the educational and other qualifications necessary. Once this is done, the applicant is assisted in filling out an application form and advised as to how he should obtain certain necessary documents, such as proof of age and education. Arrangements are then made for the applicant to present these documents and be medically examined. Once these requirements are met there is nothing further to be done until we are in a position to take him on our strength for training and he is called up accordingly.

It must be pointed out that by submitting his application and being medically examined, a recruit in no sense commits himself or prevents himself from enlisting in some other branch of the service. Until actually called

The Budget-Mr. Hanson (

to report for duty, those who have offered their services are perfectly free to withdraw their applications,-

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRESENT POSITION WITH RESPECT TO RECRUITING
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

They do

not want to do that; they want to go into the air force.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO PRESENT POSITION WITH RESPECT TO RECRUITING
Permalink

July 2, 1940