June 11, 1940

EUROPEAN WAR

PROCLAMATION DECLARING A STATE OF WAR BETWEEN CANADA AND ITALY

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

As the house will proceed in a moment to government notices of motions in order to take up the motion standing in my name respecting the defence of Canada regulations, I might perhaps be permitted to

Greenland-Canadian Representatives

give hon. members one or two communications and statements which I believe they would wish to have immediately and which otherwise might not be reached in the course of the afternoon.

The first communication is one received this morning from the High Commissioner for Canada in Great Britain stating that His Majesty the King had given his approval at Buckingham palace at 10.55 a.m. British summer time to-day to the proclamation declaring that a state of war exists between Canada and Italy as and from the 10th day of June. The proclamation has since been published in the Canada Gazette, and I would ask the permission of the house to allow it to be printed in Hansard:

Proclamation

Topic:   EUROPEAN WAR
Subtopic:   PROCLAMATION DECLARING A STATE OF WAR BETWEEN CANADA AND ITALY
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L.P.Duff,


Administrator.



Canada George the Sixth, by the Grace _ of God of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India; To all to whom these Presents shall come or whom the same may in anywise concern, Greeting: A Proclamation Ernest Lapointe, Attorney General, Canada. Whereas by and with the advice of Our Privy Council for Canada We have signified Our Approval of the issue of a Proclamation in the Canada Gazette declaring that a State of War with Italy exists and has existed in Our Dominion of Canada as and from the tenth day of June, 1940. Now, therefore, We do hereby declare and proclaim that a State of War with Italy exists and has existed in Our Dominion of Canada as and from the tenth day of June, 1940. Of all which Our Loving Subjects and all others whom these Presents may concern are hereby required to take notice and to govern themselves accordingly. In testimony whereof We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent and the Great Seal of Canada to be hereunto affixed. Witness: Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Counsellor The Right Honourable Sir Lyman Poore Duff, a Member of Our Most Honourable Privy Council, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Chief Justice of Canada and Administrator of the Government of Our Dominion of Canada. At Our Government House, in Our City of Ottawa, this tenth day of June, in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and forty and in the fourth year of Our Reign. By Command, W. L. Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada.


THE LATE HON. NORMAN ROGERS MESSAGES OP SYMPATHY FROM HIS MAJESTY THE KING AND MAJOR-GENERAL MCNAUGHTON


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister): The house, I am sure, would wish to know that I received this morning the following telegram from His Majesty the King: Buckingham Palace, London, . June 11, 1940. Prime Minister, Ottawa. I am grieved to hear of the untimely death of Mr. Norman Rogers and sincerely sympathize with you and the members of the government of Canada in the loss of a colleague whose services were so valuable at the present juncture both to the administration and to Canada. George R.I. Hon. members, I believe, would also wish to hear the following communication which was dispatched yesterday to myself and received this morning from Major-General Andrew McNaughton, the officer commanding the first division of the Canadian overseas active service force: We have just heard of the fatal accident to the Honourable Norman McL. Rogers, Minister of National Defence, and all ranks of Canada's forces overseas join in expressing our deepest sympathy to you and to your colleagues in the government of Canada in the great loss you have sustained, and we ask that our heartfelt sympathy be conveyed to Mrs. Rogers and her family in their great loss. By a single-minded purpose, his tact and his understanding Mr. Rogers had endeared himself to all with whom he came in contact. For myself, I shall always be very grateful for his patience and for the consideration which he showed to me in the difficulties inseparable from mobilization and for the support which he continued to give.


GREENLAND

PROBLEMS ARISING OUT OF SEIZURE OF DENMARK BY GERMANY-APPOINTMENT OF CANADIAN CONSULAR REPRESENTATIVES

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I have a statement which

I should like to make to the house with respect to Greenland:

Members of the house are aware that the seizure of Denmark by the Germans created a problem for Canada as the nearest neighbour of the Danish possession of Greenland. The situation was given immediate attention.

The local authorities in Greenland are continuing to administer its affairs. The German-controlled government in Copenhagen is exercising no authority.

In view of the fact that the people of Greenland normally obtain most of their supplies from Denmark and intercourse has now

Industry and the War

been suspended, the Canadian government considered it should assist in maintaining the economic life of the island. The steamship Nascopie, which is regularly used in the Canadian eastern Arctic patrol, was dispatched on a special voyage with supplies to Greenland. It arrived last week and will shortly bring back a return cargo.

We have thought it desirable that our government should be continuously informed of the situation in Greenland and be in a position to discuss with the local authorities there any questions that might arise. Steps have accordingly been taken to appoint a consul and vice consul to Greenland. Mr. Kenneth P. Kirkwood, until recently first secretary at the Canadian legation at the Hague, has been appointed consul to Greenland and has already taken up his post there. Mr. Kirkwood, who was born at Brampton, Ontario, and is a graduate of the university of Toronto, after serving in the last war, first in the infantry and later in the air force, and working in the Far East, entered the External Affairs service in 1928. He was stationed at Washington and Tokyo before being appointed to the Hague. Mr. A. E. Porsild, who was bom in Greenland and is a member of the staff of the Department of Mines and Resources, has been appointed vice consul. The United States has also appointed consular representatives in Greenland.

I may add that subsequently to Mr. Kirkwood's ' appointment, steps were taken to have Mr. E. D. IVlcGreer at the Canadian legation in Japan, and M. Pierre Dupuy of the Canadian legation staff in France given the position and duties of consuls in addition to their existing work.

Topic:   GREENLAND
Subtopic:   PROBLEMS ARISING OUT OF SEIZURE OF DENMARK BY GERMANY-APPOINTMENT OF CANADIAN CONSULAR REPRESENTATIVES
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INDUSTRY AND THE WAR

CONFERENCE OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS WITH CABINET-SUGGESTIONS COMMUNICATED TO LONDON

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

A day or two ago my hon. friend the leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) spoke of the conference which a few days before had taken place between representatives of the manufacturers' association and the government. I intimated to him at the time that the government and the manufacturers had agreed that the best method of proceeding in the matter in which they were mutually concerned was to have a message sent to our high commissioner in London which would set forth the views both of the manufacturers and of the government with regard to Canada's capacity for producing

munitions and other essential war materials, and the desire of both to have this capacity made use of to the greatest possible extent. I should like to read to the house, in order that it may be of record on Hansard the communication which has since been sent by the government to our high commissioner. It, better than anything else, will make perfectly clear the position of both parties with respect to the matter referred to. The communication was sent by myself on June 8 and was as follows:

On Thursday, June the 6th, our government received a lar^e delegation from the Canadian Manufacturers' Association to discuss the situation with respect to the manufacture in Canada of munitions and supplies for the United Kingdom and allied governments.

The delegation expressed great concern that Canadian manufacturing capacity continued to be used to such a small degree in the supply of essential war materials for the allied governments, despite the willingness of Canadian manufacturers to utilize to the full the resources of their plants for this purpose.

As you know, the government, both prior to and since the outbreak of war, have on many occasions both directly and through yourself, drawn the attention of the United Kingdom government to the availability of Canadian industrial resources, and recently in a telegram to the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom I drew Mr. Churchill's personal attention to Canadian resources in this respect.

At my suggestion that they prepare a memorandum as to what points they felt should be emphasized in representations to the United Kingdom government, the delegation from the Canadian Manufacturers' Association have sent me on June 6th the following communication:

The communication is then quoted in full as follows:

Dear Mr. King:

On behalf of the members of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, I beg to thank you and your colleagues for receiving their delegation to-day. ,

We realize fully the burdens which members of the cabinet are bearing and the many demands on their time and only the vital importance of war production would have caused us to seek an interview with you at this critical time. We are very grateful to you and your colleagues for the patient hearing which was given to us and also for the extremely interesting and valuable information that we received.

You were kind enough to offer to cable immediately to the Hon. Vincent Massey, High Commissioner for Canada in the United Kingdom. to ask him to take up with the British government the matters we discussed with you. You suggested that we prepare some notes which might be of some assistance in the drafting of your cable and we are glad to take_ advantage of the opportunity which you have kindly given us, and beg to set forth the following suggestions:

The suggestions are in quotations as follows:

"At the annual meeting of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association in Winnipeg, May 29, 30 and 31, manufacturers from all parts 9f Canada expressed themselves very strongly in

Defence of Canada Regulations

favour of mobilizing immediately the intelligence, skill, equipment and capacity of Canadian industry. They offered every possible cooperation to the Canadian, British and French governments in this terrible emergency. They expressed surprise and disappointment that, following the visit of their mission to England last summer and the presentation of Canadian industrial capacity, which was so well received in England, and the prompt appointment of a British mission to Canada, Canadian industry is being used so little up to date.

"To-day, a representative group of leading Canadian manufacturers met the Prime Minister and eleven other members of the cabinet in Ottawa and had a very helpful conference.

"Will you kindly discuss with the British government the following points which were made by the representatives of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association to-day:

1. Canadian manufacturers made war supplies to the value of $1,200,000,000 for the Imperial Munitions Board during the last war. This fact proves the capacity of Canadian industry. Canadian industrial expansion since then has made possible vastly increased manufacturing facilities, and a wider range of products, involving greatly improved technique. Full particulars were presented to the service departments of the British government by the association's mission to England last summer. This is in your possession.

2. Canadian industry again extends every possible cooperation to the British, French and Canadian governments.

3. There is available in Canada a great amount of industrial capacity, especially in the engineering, machinery and metal working trades with highly skilled technical staffs. Over a year ago, a survey of one hundred plants showed that these had available 3,000,000 square feet of floor space. Very little of this is in use now.

4. There is a great deal of machinery, equipment and tools used in peace time manufacturing, that can be adapted quickly to war manufacturing with good results in a general mobilization of industrial resources.

5. The time for placing small experimental orders is past. The British and French governments should advise immediately what they want in large quantities, and give Canadian manufacturers an opportunity to learn what is expected of them. On receipt of this information Canadian manufacturers will make their plans accordingly so as to use their plants to the best advantage."

That is the end of the suggestions which appear in quotations. The letter continues:

Permit me to assure you that the members of the delegation who met you to-day keenly appreciate your kind offer to cable Mr. Massey asking him to take up our suggestions with the British government.

Thanking you on their behalf, I remain, Yours faithfully,

(Sgd.) Harold Crabtree, President,

Canadian Manufacturers' Association.

Then my telegram to Mr. Massey continues as follows:

The government continue to be of the opinion that Canadian plants might be utilized to a far greater extent as a source of supply for the

allied governments, relatively free from the danger of hostile action, and you are accordingly directed to bring this matter once more to the attention of the appropriate authorities in the United Kingdom, setting out in particular the representations of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association as quoted in paragraph five of this telegram. I shall be obliged if in so doing you will inform the government of the United Kingdom and the heads of the departments concerned that our government concur in the views expressed by the association and repeat the assurance of our willingness and readiness to do everything possible to assist in the development of increased production in this country to meet essential war needs.

Topic:   INDUSTRY AND THE WAR
Subtopic:   CONFERENCE OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS WITH CABINET-SUGGESTIONS COMMUNICATED TO LONDON
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MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY

REPORTED CONSTRUCTION OF TWO MUNITIONS PLANTS IN CANADA BY CANADIAN, FRENCH AND BRITISH GOVERNMENTS


On the order for motions:


?

Thomas Miller Bell

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   REPORTED CONSTRUCTION OF TWO MUNITIONS PLANTS IN CANADA BY CANADIAN, FRENCH AND BRITISH GOVERNMENTS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I was going to ask my colleague the Minister of Munitions and Supply to reply to that question. As a matter of fact I think he has already made a statement in the matter.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   REPORTED CONSTRUCTION OF TWO MUNITIONS PLANTS IN CANADA BY CANADIAN, FRENCH AND BRITISH GOVERNMENTS
Permalink
NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Yes, he did.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   REPORTED CONSTRUCTION OF TWO MUNITIONS PLANTS IN CANADA BY CANADIAN, FRENCH AND BRITISH GOVERNMENTS
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June 11, 1940