May 30, 1940

NAT

Grote Stirling

National Government

Hon. GROTE STIRLING (Yale):

Would the Minister of Transport (Mr. Howe) inform the house on a point in connection with the lists of contracts which have been tabled? Frequently under the name of the contractor the phrase appears "war office requisition". Does that mean that there has been a requisition by Canada on the war office, or that it is the United Kingdom purchasing in Canada?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply; Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Transport):

The reference means that Canada has requisitioned the war office of the United Kingdom for that particular material.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
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DELIVERIES UNDER CONTRACTS-REARRANGEMENTS WITH RESPECT TO CANCELLATIONS


On the orders of the day:


CON

Joseph Henry Harris

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. H. HARRIS (Danforth):

Inasmuch as these contracts run into many millions of dollars, and there is no notation with regard to delivery, perhaps the minister would inform the house also whether delivery is up to date. And in respect to requisitions which have since been cancelled or rearranged, has rearrangement been made for the supplies from other sources, particularly the United States? Perhaps the minister could reply to-morrow.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DELIVERIES UNDER CONTRACTS-REARRANGEMENTS WITH RESPECT TO CANCELLATIONS
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INDUSTRIAL SURVEY


On the orders of the day:


CON

Joseph Henry Harris

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. H. HARRIS (Danforth):

I should like to ask the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Rogers) whether the registration of the Canadian manufacturing industry which was initiated by 'his predecessor in office has been completed, and is it up to date?

Hon. NORMAN McL. ROGERS (Minister of National Defence): I received notice of this question only a moment or so ago. I shall be glad to Obtain the information for the hon. member.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   INDUSTRIAL SURVEY
Sub-subtopic:   TABULATION OF AVAILABLE MANUFACTURING RESOURCES FOR PRODUCTION OF MILITARY REQUIREMENTS
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NATIONAL DEFENCE


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Alan Cockeram

National Government

Mr. ALAN COCKERAM (York South):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of National Defence. Is there a shortage of -303 ammunition in Canada at this time?

I understand instructions have been given to military headquarters in the various districts restricting the use of -303 ammunition to infantry battalions of the third division in training centres and machine gun battalions-

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   USE OF -303 AMMUNITION POSTPONEMENT OF CERTAIN RIFLE PRACTICES
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Hon. NORMAN McL. ROGERS (Minister of National Defence): I wonder if the hon. member feels that he is serving a useful purpose by putting a question of the kind at this time. .

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   USE OF -303 AMMUNITION POSTPONEMENT OF CERTAIN RIFLE PRACTICES
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NAT

Alan Cockeram

National Government

Mr. COCKERAM:

I do.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   USE OF -303 AMMUNITION POSTPONEMENT OF CERTAIN RIFLE PRACTICES
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LIB

Norman McLeod Rogers (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. ROGERS:

I will answer, although I entirely disagree as to the usefulness of the question at this time. Certain rifle practices have been postponed only as a result of new mobilization arrangements arising out of the decision to call up the third division and additional rifle battalions of the fourth division.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   USE OF -303 AMMUNITION POSTPONEMENT OF CERTAIN RIFLE PRACTICES
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LOAN OF $750,000,000 TO MEET LOANS OR OBLIGATIONS, TO PURCHASE UNMATURED SECURITIES, AND FOR PUBLIC WORKS AND GENERAL PURPOSES


The house resumed from Wednesday, May 29, consideration in committee of the following resolution-Mr. Ralston-Mr. Vien in the chair: That the governor in council be authorized to raise by way of loan under the provisions of the Consolidated Revenue and Audit Act, 1931, an amount not to exceed in the whole the sum of seven hundred and fifty million dollars for paying or redeeming the whole or any portion of loans or obligations of Canada and also for purchasing unmatured securities of Canada and for public works and general purposes.


NAT

William Earl Rowe

National Government

Mr. ROWE:

The attempt to comprehend the meaning of this resolution to borrow $750,000,000 further emphasizes the gigantic task that lies ahead of this country. It is a challenge to our national credit, which fortunately is high enough to sustain it. The future will test our ability to pay, and that test will be met by an energetic people in a country of vast and rich resources.

This stupendous financial provision is only one more shocking indication of the extent of the effort which will be necessary to carry out our high purpose to defend religious and individual freedom. Events of to-day and shadows of the events of to-morrow consolidate our people as nothing before has done in one common bond of effort for one common purpose. Our people, of different religions, races and languages, are standing shoulder to shoulder in the face of a peril that is common to the members of our commonwealth and to the countries which have already been overrun. While we stand by we are inspired

Government Loan-Mr. Rowe

by the actions of those gallant men of the British expeditionary force who are maintaining the finest traditions of the empire in an unexpected emergency caused by the desertion of an allied king. We are also fortified by the courage, determination and skill of the great French army. We have the further assurance of the well-grounded and lasting friendship of the great nation to the south, their president one of the greatest of world statesmen, who has struggled so earnestly to save his people from the disaster of war and is at the same time a great force in preserving democratic freedom.

Therefore while our hearts may be heavy and sad to-day, realizing the difficulties which confront us, and knowing that the way we have to go is hard and long, we believe that with God's help and by doing our duty we shall win. Closely allied with the mother countries of Britain and France we must now face fearlessly and by swift action the greatest conflict in the history of our Christian civilization. No other people in the world are more capable of accomplishing so terrific a task than this enterprising and free people, if they have courageous leadership. No people in the world have greater resources behind them, and we must be prepared to offer an ever-increasing variety of services and sacrifices if we are to meet the necessities that arise from day to day. I am sure they will challenge almost to the point of weariness the mental capacity of the government which sits to your right, Mr. Chairman, just as the physical attacks will challenge the capacity of our gallant, youthful and vigorous army which must meet them in the field. We must gird ourselves to meet this task on one common front. We must strengthen our determination, without fear or favour. No one is worthy of being in this house if he would play politics with this crisis.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   LOAN OF $750,000,000 TO MEET LOANS OR OBLIGATIONS, TO PURCHASE UNMATURED SECURITIES, AND FOR PUBLIC WORKS AND GENERAL PURPOSES
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   LOAN OF $750,000,000 TO MEET LOANS OR OBLIGATIONS, TO PURCHASE UNMATURED SECURITIES, AND FOR PUBLIC WORKS AND GENERAL PURPOSES
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NAT

William Earl Rowe

National Government

Mr. ROWE:

Indeed, Mr. Chairman, I feel that anyone who would hint that politics were being played can scarcely realize the seriousness of the situation. On the other hand we on this side are equally weak and guilty if we withhold anything that may assist to bring about a common victory. We are now a nation at war. We have a War Measures Act which contains wide and effective powers. It is now our duty to establish this country on a war basis. Our man power and resources must be rapidly mobilized to their maximum. We are told that a record has been made of our industrial capacity. That is encouraging, because it may be needed soon to replace the output of British factories. The subversive

influences that have already opened the gates of other nations in advance of the swiftly moving hordes of Hitler must be dealt with by quick and forceful means. This can be effectively accomplished, just as our forces can be effectively and successfully organized, only by an immediate registration of every man and woman in Canada. We must meet a swift aggressor with swift action. We must develop mass production to withstand a mass destroyer.

When our government fears that it will take a year or two before we can begin to produce tanks, let them talk to Mr. Henry Ford, who says that within six months he can produce a thousand aeroplanes a day. Let our government tell the people that the events of the last few years have aroused them and that now their policy is not the slow and steady mobilization of eight or nine thousand men, as it was the other day, but a rapid and vigorous recruiting of at least forty thousand men for the immediate future. The mobilization at once of a home defence army of fifty thousand men might well be considered and put into operation by the present government. The militia guards at many points, such as bridges and hydro plants, might be replaced by experienced war veterans who are not at present on the strength of the militia. To furnish supplies for these men and thousands more who may be required in the near future, our factories must not wait and run part time, as many are doing to-day. They must be speeded up and kept producing twenty-ifour hours a day.

These and many other measures are necessary, as I think everyone within sound of my voice will agree. The confidence of our people, which is necessary for the achievement of our war objectives, must be inspired by government action and government policies. The old middle-of-the-road speed, no slower or faster than the people will enjoy, is not good enough to meet a crisis such as we are facing to-day. The wait-and-see policy, politically popular in days of peace, cannot meet this situation. Economic appeasement, often mentioned in fireside chats, was a sweet phrase in days of tranquillity, but it is useless to-day. Deferred military cooperation with Britain, practised before the war, now constitutes a dangerous policy, threatening the speed which must be made in this crisis which now menaces our freedom.

I should be derelict in my duty to this house and to this country if I failed to offer these considered suggestions before we pass this gigantic expenditure which future generations will have to meet. The light of our immediate past does not reflect much encouragement in regard to the action necessary to secure

Government Loan-Mr. Rowe

our immediate future. It is a past strewn with blunders, failures and, I say again, complacencies that are almost inexcusable. Our allied forces must be supported. Those forces defeated Germany twenty-five years ago and this time those forces will not only defeat but will conquer Germany. We are not afraid; we are not downhearted, but if as a people we are going to meet a swift aggressor, hasten our victory and save the lives of many of our gallant young men, I urge upon the government to do what other governments have done when facing a crisis such as this.

I say this, Mr. Chairman, with the very deepest respect for this government and especially for my good friend the Prime Minister, whose friendship I enjoy, whose personality is delightful and whose integrity I would never allow anyone to challenge.

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   LOAN OF $750,000,000 TO MEET LOANS OR OBLIGATIONS, TO PURCHASE UNMATURED SECURITIES, AND FOR PUBLIC WORKS AND GENERAL PURPOSES
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May 30, 1940