May 30, 1940

PRIVILEGE-MR. CHURCH REFERENCES TO CANADIAN NAVY IN DEBATE ON NAVAL SERVICE BILL

NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

I rise to a question of privilege in connection with my remarks in the debate yesterday on Canada's navy. My remarks related to a return that I was about to read when the minister replied. This return is dated February 14, 1938, and is found on page 392 of Hansard for that year. It contains particulars of what the navy consists of, where it was located, whether any of the fleet had gone to Sino-Japanese waters, and the goodwill cruises for that year.

The minister replied on that occasion that the destroyers had left for a winter cruise in January and that the schooner Venture would cruise in West Indies waters. The programme for the visit was released to the press on January 4 and 5 of that year. That report is what my address was based on. I never made any reflection on the great body of men of the navy, As I said in this house yesterday and on other occasions, Canada has cause to be proud of her men of all ranks in uniform, in the army, the navy and the air force. They are the real people to be proud of and what they are doing to win the war. Their history is a history of courage. Yesterday and for the past ten years I have supported a policy of rearmament, which the minister brought down in 1938. I have known the minister who spoke yesterday for many years and until yesterday have always found him very courteous. I should probably have used the expression "goodwill navy" instead of "show navy." I try to cooperate with the government, and there is one thing I can say because I have known him a long time, that the Prime Minister has always shown courtesy and politeness to members of the opposition.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. CHURCH REFERENCES TO CANADIAN NAVY IN DEBATE ON NAVAL SERVICE BILL
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


BREN MACHINE GUN CONTRACT

CCF

Mr. WRIGHT:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What is the total amount paid to date, under the terms of the Bren machine gun contract with the John Inglis Company?

2. What is the estimated remaining amount which the government will have to pay before the terms of the contract are fulfilled?

3. On this basis, what is the estimated cost to the Canadian government for the Bren machine gun, per unit?

Topic:   BREN MACHINE GUN CONTRACT
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LIB

Mr. ROGERS: (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. $1,882,997.56.

2. Estimated amount: $3,725,826.62.

3. The above total of $5,608,824.18 includes capital costs of $1,600,708.18. On this basis the estimated unit cost per gun and spare parts (per set), exclusive of capital costs, is $572.59. (Gun $368.30; spare parts $204.29).

Topic:   BREN MACHINE GUN CONTRACT
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FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL-FREE AND OFFICIAL RATES

CON

Mr. HARRIS (Danforth):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What was the free market exchange rate between the Canadian dollar and the United States dollar and the British pound September 1, 1939; October 1, 1939; November 1, 1939; December 1, 1939; January 1, 1940; February 1, 1940; March 1, 1940; April 1, 1940; May 15, 1940?

2. What was the exchange control rate at the same dates?

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL-FREE AND OFFICIAL RATES
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LIB

Mr. RALSTON: (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. Note-The so-called free market for Canadian dollars in the United States simply represents scattered transactions between nonresidents, when a non-resident may happen to have Canadian dollars to sell. Wide fluctuations in rates take place and it is difficult at any time to establish an accurate measure of prevailing rates as the volume of transactions of this kind is relatively small. In these circumstances the rates published by the federal reserve bank of New York probably represent the best approximation of prevailing rates based on the comparatively small volume of transactions of this kind.

Exchange rates in the so-called free market referred to above for Canadian dollar and British pound in New York, as published by the federal reserve bank of New York:

Exchange rate for British

Canadian British pound in dollars pound Montreal

Sept. 1, 1939... 95-625 4-21 4-4625Oct. 2, (( 88-875 4-015 no free marketNov. 1, (( 89-625 4-00 UDec. 1, (( 86-9375 3-895 (tJan. 2, 1940... 88-625 3-955 UFeb. 1, (( 87-4375 3-96 itMar. 1, (t 86-125 3-93 liApr. 1, (( 81-50 3-56 uMay 15, U 81-8125 3-24 u2. Foreign exchange control was not instituted in Canada until September 16, 1939. The official rates set by the foreign exchange control board on that date were as follows: Sterling-4.43 buying-4.47 selling United States dollar-1.10 buying-1.11 selling

Questions

which is equivalent to quotation of 90.91- 90.09 for the Canadian dollar in the United States.

These rates have not been changed since September 16, 1939.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL-FREE AND OFFICIAL RATES
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ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE

CADETS AND EX-CADETS IN ACTIVE SERVICE

NAT

Mr. BRUCE:

National Government

1. Has the Minister of National Defence called up for war service the hundreds of cadets and ex-cadets of the Royal Military College?

2. If not, is he prepared to tell the house whether he contemplates doing so in the near future?

Topic:   ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE
Subtopic:   CADETS AND EX-CADETS IN ACTIVE SERVICE
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LIB

Mr. ROGERS: (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. (a) Under the regulations, all gentlemen cadets on leaving the college with a diploma of graduation or a certificate of military qualification, who have not obtained a commission in the royal navy, or in his majesty's regular land or air forces, or in the corresponding naval, land or air forces of the other portions of the empire, are required to accept combatant commissions in the R.C.N.V.R., or the non-permanent active militia or the non-permanent active air force. Having thus become established in the various arms of the service, full scope is provided for their appointment to active service units.

(b) According to available information there were, as on the 17th May, 1940, 534 ex-gentlemen cadets of the Royal Military College serving in the active service components of the sea, land and air forces of Canada and Great Britain.

The total output from the Royal Military College in the past twenty years has been about 900. This means that in the 9th month of the War, 60 per cent of the entire output from the Royal Military College in the past twenty years is already serving.

2. Action has already been taken through appropriate channels to inform district officers commanding of other ex-gentlemen cadets who are anxious to serve in the Canadian active service force.

distribution of copies of bills to members

Topic:   ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE
Subtopic:   CADETS AND EX-CADETS IN ACTIVE SERVICE
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

Will the government consider having a copy of all bills of the House of Commons placed in the post office boxes of members on the day on which they are filed in the chamber?

Topic:   ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE
Subtopic:   CADETS AND EX-CADETS IN ACTIVE SERVICE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

As hon. members are aware, immediately after the bills are printed they are distributed by the pages to the desks of all hon. members. If however there is a general desire that there should be further distribution, that copies of bills should

be put in the post office boxes, His Honour the Speaker is quite agreeable that that should be done. The government is also agreeable. It might however be advisable for the whips to confer in reference to what it will mean in the way of additional distribution.

Topic:   ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE
Subtopic:   CADETS AND EX-CADETS IN ACTIVE SERVICE
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BATA SHOE COMPANY-MACHINERY IMPORTS

CON

Mr. HARRIS (Danforth):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What was the value of machinery imported into Canada by the Bata Shoe Company of Frankford, Ontario, during the fiscal years ending March 31, 1938; March 31, 1939; March 31, 1940?

2. Did the Bata Shoe Company, Frankford, Ontario, pay duty on all machinery imported into Canada?

3. If not, what was the value of the machinery imported duty free by the Bata Shoe Company, Frankford, Ontario?

4. Did the Bata Shoe Company, Frankford, Ontario, pay a sales tax on all machinery imported into Canada?

5. Under what tariff items was the machinery imported into Canada by the Bata Shoe Company ?

6. Through what ports of entry was the machinery of the Bata Shoe Company imported into Canada?

Topic:   BATA SHOE COMPANY-MACHINERY IMPORTS
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LIB

Mr. ILSLEY: (Postmaster General; Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

1. It is contrary to established practice to give information which would disclose the private business of any individual or concern.

2. Yes.

3. Answered by No. 2.

4. Yes, where exigible.

5. Under various tariff items.

6. The principal ports of importation were Belleville, Trenton and Montreal.

Topic:   BATA SHOE COMPANY-MACHINERY IMPORTS
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NATIONAL DEFENCE-USE OF SERVICES OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS

May 30, 1940