May 13, 1939

LIB

Mr. EULER: (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. Number

Cattle, for improvement of stock

Cattle, for dairy purposes, n.o.p., weighing 175 lbs. to 700 lbs

Cattle, for dairy purposes, n.o.p., weighing over 700 lbs

Cattle, n.o.p., weighing less than 175 lbs.

Cattle, n.o.p., weighing 175 lbs. to 700

lbs [DOT] [DOT] * [DOT]

Cattle, n.o.p., weighing over 700 lbs... 27,307

Total 27,307

2. Cwt.

Beef, fresh, chilled or frozen 20,479

Beef, pickled, in barrels

Total 20,479

Topic:   BEEF AND CATTLE EXPORTS TO GREAT BRITAIN
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ROYAL VISIT

REARRANGEMENT OF PROGRAM NECESSITATED BY DELAY IN ARRIVAL OF THEIR MAJESTIES AT QUEBEC

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Topic:   ROYAL VISIT
Subtopic:   REARRANGEMENT OF PROGRAM NECESSITATED BY DELAY IN ARRIVAL OF THEIR MAJESTIES AT QUEBEC
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ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY THE KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS ARRIVAL IN CANADA

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Throughout the present week his majesty's subjects in all parts of the empire have been following with intense interest and with some moments of anxiety the voyage of their king and queen across the Atlantic from the old world to the new. On Saturday, the sixth instant, the Empress of Australia weighed anchor at Portsmouth and on Tuesday next is expected to drop anchor at Wolfe's cove, Quebec. As the hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Manion) pointed out a day or two ago, on the eve of the departure of their majesties from Portsmouth the houses of parliament at Westminster passed resolutions of loyal assurance of the affectionate interest with which both houses would follow their majesties' visit to Canada and to the

Royal Visit

United States. I agree with my hon. friend that it is most appropriate that the houses of parliament at Ottawa should pass similar resolutions to greet their majesties upon their arrival at Quebec, and I have therefore the honour to present the following motion, which will be seconded by my hon. friend the leader of the opposition:

That a humble address be presented to Hia Majesty the King, conveying to his majesty, on the occasion of his arrival in Canada, assurance of the loyal affection of this house and of the eager anticipation with which it looks forward to the presence of His Majesty and of Her Majesty the Queen in this country, and of the deep interest with which its members will follow the visit of their majesties to the several provinces and to the United States.

Hon. members will be quick to recognize that, except for the application of its wording to Canada instead of to the United Kingdom, the resolution follows very much the same language, in fact almost the identical language, of the resolutions which were passed at Westminster. I mention this feature as significant because it serves to illustrate the similarity of our political institutions and also to indicate how completely the crown symbolizes the unity of the great commonwealth of nations which is also referred to as the British empire. It illustrates as well the imporant part which the personality and character of the sovereign plays in coordinating the political relations of all parts of the commonwealth.

I need not say how greatly the people of Canada will rejoice at having the honour of welcoming in person their king and queen upon the soil of Canada itself. We are deeply conscious of how considerate their majesties have been of the wishes of their subjects in Canada in arranging to come to the dominion within two years of their coronation and in making the Dominion of Canada the first of the dominions to be honoured by their presence.

It is deeply gratifying that their majesties tour will embrace all the provinces of Canada. We are grateful that the king and queen have been prepared to assume so many onerous obligations in their desire to see as much as possible of Canada and its people. I have no doubt it will be the wish of all Canadians not only that they themselves should have as large an opportunity as possible of seeing the king and queen and giving expression to their feelings of loyalty and affection, but that their majesties should have some opportunity, in addition to receiving the welcome they will in the towns and cities visited, of seeing something of the natural beauty of our country, its varied scenery, its national parks, its countryside and its peaceful homes.

We of the Commons feel particularly honoured that His Majesty the King, by graciously consenting to give royal assent to certain bills, has afforded to hon. members of both houses the opportunity of meeting with the king in parliament assembled.

It will also be pleasing to the citizens of Canada that the king and queen should have decided while visiting Canada also to pay a visit to our good neighbour to the south. I venture to say there is nothing in the course of their visit across the sea which will appeal more to the king and queen than what they will witness of the exceptionally happy relations which exist between Canada and the United States. The example of international friendship and goodwill which the countries of this continent afford is particularly significant in these days.

Before concluding I should like to express a word of appreciation of the work performed by the interdepartmental committee in making the arrangements for their majesties' visit. As the house is aware, these arrangements have been in the hands of members of the public service in the different departments in Ottawa. They have had the very helpful cooperation of officials in the different provincial capitals, and of many municipalities. On behalf of the government I wish to express our appreciation of these efforts to those who have worked so hard and cooperated so effectively in making the visit of the king and queen to our country the very memorable and historic one which we all know it will be.

Topic:   ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY THE KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS ARRIVAL IN CANADA
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CON

Robert James Manion (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I have very great pleasure indeed in seconding the motion proposed by the right hon. the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), extending, as it does, a hearty and loyal welcome to their majesties on their first setting foot on the soil of Canada at the city of Quebec.

We Canadians are happy in belonging to the British empire and in possessing at the same time a royal family of whom we may well be proud. When I speak of the empire the word brings to my mind not only the great democracy which we call Britain-not only one-quarter of the surface of the earth and one-quarter of its population, not only that group of autonomous nations equal in status, freely associated by long friendship and ideals-but the fact that we are all united by a common allegiance to the crown; for it is the tie that binds us together.

Our empire has been blessed with many great sovereigns. My own life stretches from the great Victoria to the present ideal king- both of them constitutional monarchs, acting always on the advice of their ministers.

Electoral Matters

Among our greatest sovereigns was the father of the present king, George V, with whom was associated the beloved Queen Mary. George V did much to help foster international understanding, particularly in Tegard to the American republic, whose people learned from him much of British ideals, aims and aspirations. I join with the remark of the Prime Minister in that regard, that the visit of the present king and queen to the United States will continue to build up these fine relations existing to-day between the American republic and the British empire.

The last Christmas message of King George Y, to which we all listened with reverent affection, struck a human note which was , heard around the world; and now his son George VI is following his father's noble example.

King George VI shows the same type of greatness as that possessed by his father-a greatness displayed not in dazzling qualities but by the possession of a well-balanced mind, sound common sense, good judgment, and intense devotion to duty, combined with human understanding, sympathy for the less fortunate and downtrodden, charity for weaknesses in others, and a strong desire for peace and goodwill among the nations of the world. That is a combination of qualities rarely found in any one man.

Finally, King George VI and his gracious consort show us a noble example of home life, of happy domesticity, something for which we may be truly grateful, since the home is the very cornerstone of the nation.

For all these reasons we, the representatives of the people here assembled, whether of English-speaking or French-speaking extraction, join with one voice, one heart and one mind in welcoming His Majesty King George VI and his gracious queen to the shores of Canada. We express at the same time our fervent hope that their visit may be happy and profitable in every way and that they may return to their home in the British Isles confident of the sincere loyalty and deep affection of every true Canadian.

Topic:   ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY THE KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS ARRIVAL IN CANADA
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

The social crediters in Alberta, in Canada, and throughout the empire feel warm devotion to the British commonwealth, its unity, its greatness and its mission. For their majesties we entertain sentiments of esteem and love. With all our hearts we welcome them. Long may they happily reign.

Topic:   ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY THE KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS ARRIVAL IN CANADA
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CCF

Abraham Albert Heaps

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. A. A. HEAPS (Winnipeg North):

On behalf of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation group I wish to associate myself with what has been said by the right hon.

the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Manion), and by the leader of the Social Credit group (Mr. Blackmore). I need hardly say that we are pleased to support the motion submitted by the Prime Minister.

Topic:   ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY THE KING ON THE OCCASION OF HIS ARRIVAL IN CANADA
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Motion agreed to. Whereupon the members of the house rose and sang God save the King ELECTORAL MATTERS


CONCURRENCE IN THIRD REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE


The house resumed, from Thursday, May 4, the debate on the motion of Mr. Bothwell for concurrence in the third report of the special committee on electoral matters.


LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Hon. C. G. POWER (Minister of Pensions and National Health):

On Thursday last, in adjourning the debate on the motion standing in the name of the hon. member for Swift Current (Mr. Bothwell) for concurrence in the third report of the special committee on electoral matters, I stated to the house that the matter raised by the hon. member for St. Lawrenee-St. George (Mr. Cahan) would be further studied. We have made some further study, and although I am not prepared to say that there will be any amendment made to the report of the committee, I hope to be able to present some suggested amendments to the house when the bill which will follow concurrence in this report is brought down. Should concurrence be given to-day I shall introduce a resolution on Monday so that a bill may be introduced.

Topic:   CONCURRENCE IN THIRD REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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Motion agreed to.


POSTAL SERVICE

SUGGESTED HOLIDAY FOR STAFF ON THE DAY OF THEIR MAJESTIES' ARRIVAL IN OTTAWA


On the orders of the day:


CON

Robert James Manion (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Leader of the Opposition) :

I should like to direct a question to the Postmaster General (Mr. McLarty). I understand that the day of their majesties' arrival in Ottawa is to be a civic holiday. 1 also understand that a ruling has gone out that the postmen must deliver mail on that day. If I may be permitted to make a suggestion, I am informed that at least half- more than half-of the postmen are returned soldiers and are very anxious to take part in the reception. Most of us would be better off anyway without about three-quarters of

Foreign Wheat Purchases

the mail we receive; therefore I suggest that the postmen be given the same holiday as practically everyone else in the city will enjoy. I hope the Postmaster General will give consideration to the matter.

Hon. NORMAN A. McLARTY (Postmaster General); I shall be glad indeed to give consideration to the matter. My understanding was not that of my hon. friend. My information is that at each point, as their majesties arrive, only a mere skeleton staff is kept on in the post offices. I thought it appropriate that on the day of their majesties' arrival no service should be given. This matter is one that was dealt with by the interdepartmental committee. I believe they dealt not only with those employed in the postal service but with other government services as well. However, I shall look into the matter and give my hon. friend further information.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED HOLIDAY FOR STAFF ON THE DAY OF THEIR MAJESTIES' ARRIVAL IN OTTAWA
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CON

Robert James Manion (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

One of the postmen stopped me this morning as I came along and told me they were being tied up at work, and I thought it was hardly fair to them.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED HOLIDAY FOR STAFF ON THE DAY OF THEIR MAJESTIES' ARRIVAL IN OTTAWA
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LIB

Norman Alexander McLarty (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. McLARTY:

I agree with my hon. friend, and I will give him full information at a later time.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED HOLIDAY FOR STAFF ON THE DAY OF THEIR MAJESTIES' ARRIVAL IN OTTAWA
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May 13, 1939