May 10, 1939

LIB

Thomas Bruce McNevin

Liberal

Mr. McNEVIN:

The collections are about eighty millions. .

Topic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Subtopic:   POWERS OF BOARD RESPECTING THE MARKETING OF WHEAT-INITIAL PAYMENT OF 70 CENTS A BUSHEL
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

Topic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Subtopic:   POWERS OF BOARD RESPECTING THE MARKETING OF WHEAT-INITIAL PAYMENT OF 70 CENTS A BUSHEL
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LIB

John Gordon Ross

Liberal

Mr. ROSS (Moose Jaw):

Take it as read.

Topic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Subtopic:   POWERS OF BOARD RESPECTING THE MARKETING OF WHEAT-INITIAL PAYMENT OF 70 CENTS A BUSHEL
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

I am quite agreeable.

Topic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Subtopic:   POWERS OF BOARD RESPECTING THE MARKETING OF WHEAT-INITIAL PAYMENT OF 70 CENTS A BUSHEL
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LIB

William Henry Golding

Liberal

Mr. GOLDING:

Go ahead and read it.

Topic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Subtopic:   POWERS OF BOARD RESPECTING THE MARKETING OF WHEAT-INITIAL PAYMENT OF 70 CENTS A BUSHEL
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LIB

Walter Edward Foster (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Unless the hon. member has unanimous consent it cannot be placed on the official report without being read. But I think it has already been placed on Hansard by other hon. members.

Topic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Subtopic:   POWERS OF BOARD RESPECTING THE MARKETING OF WHEAT-INITIAL PAYMENT OF 70 CENTS A BUSHEL
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

I do not think this has been drawn to the attention of the house at all. I can read what remains in five minutes.

The western conference, as has already been indicated, was summoned to face facts, however unpleasant. We derive some comfort from the hope that the present situation is not permanent. Our belief is that any improvement in international relations and economic conditions in Europe will bring about a better balance between production and consumption, and must be reflected in an improvement in wheat prices.

In repeating our prior request for an 80 cent guarantee and before proceeding to analyze the published alternative proposals of the government, may we in conclusion of this portion of our submission respectfully affirm the following:

. 1- Western Canada is practically unanimous m supporting our application for a continuation of the present price protection as a minimum requirement to maintain economic stability in the west during the coming year.

They went on to say that various individual members of this delegation support this statement.

2. The organized producers of eastern Canada, knowing the special needs of western agriculture and fearful of the effects of the disorganization of the Canadian agricultural economy which would inevitably follow if reasonable wheat prices are not maintained, have, we are advised, already indicated to the government their general support of our position.

3. Representatives of industry and finance recognize their own partial dependence upon the western farmer, and are not in the main opposed to a continuance of national assistance to the wheat industry, but in general support it as a necessary national safeguarding of the national interest.

We now ask your permission to deal briefly with the proposed legislative program of the government in so far as it affects western agriculture.

Then they go on to discuss the other bill.

I do not propose to put that upon the record because I am dealing at the moment with Bill No. 63. But I wanted to place upon the record the considered opinion of the group representing many western interests, arrived at in connection with Bill No. 63. In my

Electoral Matters-Special Committee

opinion, the western prairies-and I speak not of the farmers only but of the people generally who live there-face disaster it the initial price of 70 cents should prove to be the maximum price during the coming year. The agricultural industry cannot operate on that low return, and after years of low prices the farmers were hoping that they might be able to replenish some of their depleted household necessities, clothing and so on.

So far as the limitation of 5,000 bushels is concerned, I agree with what the hon. member for Weyburn (Mr. Douglas) said earlier this evening, and would merely add that again and again in this house in these debates the cost of production of highly mechanized industry on large farms has been quoted as the basis. If we are to compete in a world in which there is to be keen competition, it seems to me that instead of fewer highly efficient mechanized farms producing a commodity for the world market we shall have more large mechanized farms producing for that market. The only alternative is that the people engaged in the production of these commodities shall accept, as I said the other day, a peasant level of subsistence-and I mean "peasant ' not in the sense in which it was perhaps taken the other day, but in the sense of the low standard of living of the land workers that is to be found in the European countries. So, if we are going to limit the delivery of wheat, we should also take into consideration this fact, that the men who over the last ten years have been tilling a section or more of land have, because of the conditions, each year sustained proportionately heavier losses than those who have been operating smaller farms in the same districts, and they ought to be entitled to some consideration. I recognize, of course, that it may be necessary to take delivery on a graduated scale up to so many hundreds or thousands of bushels at one price and, above that, at a perhaps lower price; nevertheless to throw a large quantity of non-board wheat into the open market in competition with board wheat may have a bad effect not only upon the farmers themselves but upon the experience of the government in handling this wheat through its board.

On motion of Mr. Blaekmore, the debate was adjourned.

Topic:   CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD
Subtopic:   POWERS OF BOARD RESPECTING THE MARKETING OF WHEAT-INITIAL PAYMENT OF 70 CENTS A BUSHEL
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PRIVATE BILL

PRESCOTT AND OGDENSBURG BRIDGE COMPANY


The house having reverted to the order for motions.


LIB

Ross Wilfred Gray (Chief Government Whip; Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. R. W. GRAY (Lambton West):

With the permission of the house I move:

That Bill No. 139, to incorporate the Prescott and Ogdensburg Bridge Company be now read a second time and referred to the committee on private bills.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   PRESCOTT AND OGDENSBURG BRIDGE COMPANY
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Transport):

I should like to debate this bill. Could this motion not be made to-morrow? I am expecting a report on this bill. It is rather an important one.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   PRESCOTT AND OGDENSBURG BRIDGE COMPANY
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CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacNICOL:

Has the bill been read the first time?

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   PRESCOTT AND OGDENSBURG BRIDGE COMPANY
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LIB

Ross Wilfred Gray (Chief Government Whip; Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. GRAY:

It is a senate bill; it has been debated there.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   PRESCOTT AND OGDENSBURG BRIDGE COMPANY
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LIB

Walter Edward Foster (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

This is the first instance of this kind since the motion was passed suspending the rules of the house a few days ago. Bills from the senate when reported here are supposed to be read the first time. This bill will stand for second reading; proposing it to-night will give the hon. member a chance to have the bill referred to the committee on private bills.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   PRESCOTT AND OGDENSBURG BRIDGE COMPANY
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

I suggest that it should go not to the private bills committee but to the committee on railways, where such bills have always been sent. This is rather an important bill. I think it should have a little more consideration than it is being given.

Motion stands.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   PRESCOTT AND OGDENSBURG BRIDGE COMPANY
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At eleven o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order. Thursday, May 11, 1939


May 10, 1939