March 21, 1939

TARIFF BOARD

INQUIRY AS TO REPORT ON REFERENCE RESPECTING VEGETABLE OILS


On the orders of the day:


IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. A. W. NEILL (Comox-Alberni):

Mr. Speaker, I would ask the Minister of Finance (Mr. Dunning) if he has any knowledge as to when he expects to receive a report from the tariff board on the reference respecting vegetable oils.

Canada-United, States Trade Agreement

Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance): I hope my hon. friend will allow that question to stand. He can understand that, owing to the very much regretted death of the chairman of the tariff board, it will take a little time for me to assure myself as to just how things stand with regard to various tariff board reports. I frankly confess I have not had time even to commence doing so as yet.

Topic:   TARIFF BOARD
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO REPORT ON REFERENCE RESPECTING VEGETABLE OILS
Permalink

INQUIRY FOR RETURN

QUESTION OF PREPARING NATIONAL REGISTER FOR DEFENCE, ECONOMIC OR OTHER PURPOSES


On the orders of the day:


CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the government when I may expect an order for a proper return asked for on January 12, again on February 3, and again on March 10 relating to a most important matter, that of a national register for defence or economic or industrial or labour purposes, and whether a census or national register will be compiled of Canada's industrial power, economic power, food power, man power, military and defence power, and the unemployed. I should like to find out from the various ministers concerned-defence, labour and agriculture-where this return is, because the defence of the realm is important. My question was:

1. Have any steps been taken by the government to secure a national register for Canada for defence or economic or industrial or labour purposes ?

2. If so, what are they?

3. Will a census or modern doomsday book, or national register be ordered or compiled of: (a) industrial power (b) economic power; (c) food power; (d) man power; (e) military and defence power, and (f) unemployed?

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURN
Subtopic:   QUESTION OF PREPARING NATIONAL REGISTER FOR DEFENCE, ECONOMIC OR OTHER PURPOSES
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, so far as the Department of National Defence is concerned, the information was forwarded to the appropriate department, but as the return concerned at least three departments of government it would be tabled by the Secretary of State.

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURN
Subtopic:   QUESTION OF PREPARING NATIONAL REGISTER FOR DEFENCE, ECONOMIC OR OTHER PURPOSES
Permalink
CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

Can the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) tell us when we may expect his part of the return on food power? Where is this return so far as the Department of Agriculture is concerned?

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURN
Subtopic:   QUESTION OF PREPARING NATIONAL REGISTER FOR DEFENCE, ECONOMIC OR OTHER PURPOSES
Permalink
LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. FERNAND RINFRET (Secretary of State):

Mr. Speaker, I shall inquire into the matter and see if I cannot expedite the tabling of the return.

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURN
Subtopic:   QUESTION OF PREPARING NATIONAL REGISTER FOR DEFENCE, ECONOMIC OR OTHER PURPOSES
Permalink

WAYS AND MEANS

EUROPEAN SITUATION-REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION OF GOVERNMENT'S STATEMENT OF POLICY


Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance) moved that the house go into committee of ways and means.


CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Before you leave the chair, Mr. Speaker; although I do not wish to delay the Minister of Finance (Mr. Dunning), there is a matter which, with your permission, I should like to bring before the house for three or four minutes, and this is the only day this week on which it can be mentioned. I ask the government to clarify the statement which was made by the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) yesterday on foreign affairs and Canada's position. I agree with a great deal of what he said, and also with what the leader of the opposition (Mr. Manion) so well said. We should also, I say, have in this country a maximum of unity on these matters of national security and defence, and a minimum of criticism, because, as Adam Smith said, and do not forget that, security is better than opulence. At the same time I wish to point out that, although this is the forty-eighth day of the session, no action has been taken, the house does not know and the country cannot read between the lines and find out what is Canada's policy on this great question of life and death which confronts civilization to-day. Where is Canada, and what is she doing? It seems to me that Canada's policy is that "the pen is mightier than the sword"; but that is not so with Hitler and the other dictators. This land is much coveted by them because of its great natural resources and raw materials. I think the time has come when all the facts should be told and the country should be taken into the confidence of the government. I do not think we could do better than to follow the precedent in respect to publicity of facts set in England by Mr. Chamberlain, when, in his recent speech at the last dinner of the parliamentary press gallery in London, he said:

If the people are not allowed to know the facts; if they are only allowed to know what their rulers choose them to know, then that people are in danger of being led to embark upon a course which may presently lead them into disaster.

Speaking later in the House of Commons, he defined the country's commitments, gave the exact details and answered dozens of questions. I have examined day by day the London newspapers, particularly the Times,

2096 COMMONS

Canada-United States Trade Agreement

and I find that there was a very elaborate debate in the House of Commons the other day on this matter; almost every day the question is up there. One question which was then asked was, "Where is Canada?" Well, as I have said, we are at the forty-eighth day of the session, and parliament and the country are entitled to know, and we do not know as yet, where we are with regard to our security or defence on land, on the sea, or in the air. We have practically no defences except those supplied by the mother country as was the case in 1812. I believe that my honoured leader, who served so ably and faithfully in the war, gave a very fair statement as far as it goes, and I agree with him that we must not introduce politics into this matter or try to keep the country in the dark. Our silence is playing of politics. How is it that by leave of the radio commission this subject of defence of the realm and foreign affairs can be debated every Sunday and every day almost on the radio, yet this house is denied the right of knowing the facts which concern the security of Canada at this time? We do not know where we are. Italy and Japan our old allies have been driven since 1922 into the arms of Germany and very foolishly so; to-day Britain is "going it alone" with France. We should certainly know something more about what is going on.

I do not wish to embarrass the Prime Minister. Far from it; I should like to support him; and I believe the country, irrespective of class or creed or politics or anything else, will support him if he will do something. We do not know whether in Canada we are secure or not. Are we to wait until the enemy sails up the St. Lawrence? We know they can be here in a few hours if they come west instead of east, and they can by an air attack destroy every public utility in Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec, and Toronto in a few hours. The maritimes and Quebec will be the first to suffer. We know what a lack of defence policy and silence led to in 1914. The late Lord Roberts went up and down Great Britain and came to this country and told the people of the grave danger ahead, but his speeches were called pernicious and dangerous, even up to three days before the outbreak of war, because he predicted it and he had not a single statesman except Lord Milner with him. Are we going to repeat that in 1939 by our silence and lack of preparation before it is too late.

I am not going to take up any more time, because I should like to see the Minister of Finance (Mr. Dunning) get on with his work,

but I believe that the time has come when we should have some action and an announcement from the government, or a day set aside soon so that the matter may be discussed.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   EUROPEAN SITUATION-REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION OF GOVERNMENT'S STATEMENT OF POLICY
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I might say to my hon. friend that it seems to me the more appropriate time to discuss the matter to which he has just referred would be on the estimates of the Department of National Defence or on the estimates of the Department of External Affairs. Those estimates will be presented as soon as we have made the desired progress with the measures which have been before the house up to the present time.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   EUROPEAN SITUATION-REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION OF GOVERNMENT'S STATEMENT OF POLICY
Permalink

CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT


The house in committee of ways and means, Mr. Sanderson in the chair. On schedule I. Customs tariff-234. Perfumery, including toilet preparations, non-alcoholic, viz., hair oils, tooth and other powders and washes, pomatums, pastes and all other perfumed preparations, n.o.p., used for the hair, mouth or skin: 30 per cent.


CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacNICOL:

When the committee

rose last evening I was about to ask if the n.o.p. in this item referred to the whole line of perfumes, or if there is some other item in the tariff which applies only to perfumes?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
Permalink
LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

There are several items, but within this item are comprised creams, solid and liquid of all kinds; brilliantine, oily or liquid; face powders, talcum powders, sachet powders, lipstick, compacts, bath salts, lotions, and toilet water, non-alcoholic.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
Permalink

March 21, 1939